Relatively new user


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seldonca
Posts: 44
Joined: Sun Jun 17, 2012 1:47 pm
Location: Neepawa, Manitoba
Motorcycle: 1982 Aspencade
1984 Magna V30

Relatively new user

Postby seldonca » Fri Feb 01, 2013 2:21 pm



Just realized I never introduced myself before asking questions. I'm new to GoldWing ownership, just bought my first one a couple of weeks ago. Its a 1982 Aspencade with 117,000 Kms on it, 73,000 miles for our American friends. After much reading on this site I've decided to replace the timing belts on it before I even attempt to ride it. One plus is that when I went to look at it prior to buying it, it started in -20 degree weather and ran fine. One question I do have is this, I've never ridden a bike this big, my current ride is a 1984 Magna V30 (500 cc), is there anything I should watch out for when making the switch over to a much bigger bike?



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RoadRogue
Posts: 1913
Joined: Sun Jun 06, 2010 10:51 pm
Location: Castlegar BC, Canada
Motorcycle: 1997 1500SE

Re: Relatively new user

Postby RoadRogue » Fri Feb 01, 2013 4:18 pm

Welcome to the forum , glad to have yet another Canuck with us. The only advice I can give you on the difference between bikes is to spend a couple of hours in the parking lot getting the feel of the larger and therefore heavier bike . The fairing does block your view of the front wheel and it will take some time to get used to knowing where it is.

While you are playing in the parking lot expect to drop the bike at least once. you can save the chrome on the crash bars by slipping a piece of split garden hose over them till you feel comfortable with the way the bike handles. The 1100 is a great bike, I wouldnt hesitate to jump on mine and ride across the country tomorrow knowing all I would have to do to it was the usual consumables tires,oil brakepads and of course fuel. 8-)
Ride safe, Todd
Over night campers welcome

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seldonca
Posts: 44
Joined: Sun Jun 17, 2012 1:47 pm
Location: Neepawa, Manitoba
Motorcycle: 1982 Aspencade
1984 Magna V30

Re: Relatively new user

Postby seldonca » Fri Feb 01, 2013 4:40 pm

Thanks for the advice, I'm chomping at the bit waiting for the weather to get warm enough to ride. Its been in the -30s around here lately. I'm waiting til the weather changes a bit before I bring it home, its still in Regina right now. I think I did well with it, the PO just had the carbs rebuilt, rebuilt all the brake calipers and replaced the pads. He replaced the clutch and throttle cables too, so I'm hoping after replacing the timing belts and all the fluids she'll be ready to go.

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RoadRogue
Posts: 1913
Joined: Sun Jun 06, 2010 10:51 pm
Location: Castlegar BC, Canada
Motorcycle: 1997 1500SE

Re: Relatively new user

Postby RoadRogue » Fri Feb 01, 2013 5:34 pm

check the date codes on the tires, if older than 5 years or if they show any side wall cracking change them out. Replace the headlight bulb with a sylvainia ultra star, fix the three yellow wires next to the battery and change the dog bone fuse for a blade type auto fuse and holder. These are just small "fixes" that have proven to be a good idea over the years.
My first Wing was an 82 Aspy as well. Great machine your gonna love it.
Ride safe, Todd
Over night campers welcome

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WingAdmin
Site Admin
Posts: 17045
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 4:16 pm
Location: Strongsville, OH
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1982 GL1100A Aspencade (sold)
1989 PC800 (wife's!)
1998 XV250 Virago (sold)
2007 Aspen Sentry Trailer

Re: Relatively new user

Postby WingAdmin » Sun Feb 03, 2013 10:55 pm

My first wing was also an 82 Aspencade.

I agree - spend lots of time in parking lots, going slower and slower. Once you're moving well, it's easy to ride, the bigness and heaviness really only comes into play at slow speeds. The only way to get past that is lots and lots of practice.

Trail braking is a huge help at slow speeds, it really stabilizes the bike and helps you maneuver it the way you want it to.

Oh....always make sure the steering is straight ahead when you come to a stop. ALWAYS! You will learn the hard way what happens if you don't. :)

User avatar
seldonca
Posts: 44
Joined: Sun Jun 17, 2012 1:47 pm
Location: Neepawa, Manitoba
Motorcycle: 1982 Aspencade
1984 Magna V30

Re: Relatively new user

Postby seldonca » Mon Feb 04, 2013 12:25 pm

I had to look up trail braking, it sorta goes against everything I was taught when learning how to ride. it will take some practicing to get the hang of it :D

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WingAdmin
Site Admin
Posts: 17045
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 4:16 pm
Location: Strongsville, OH
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1982 GL1100A Aspencade (sold)
1989 PC800 (wife's!)
1998 XV250 Virago (sold)
2007 Aspen Sentry Trailer

Re: Relatively new user

Postby WingAdmin » Mon Feb 04, 2013 12:41 pm

When you're riding a big bike with a big engine that has lots of mass, you can't expect it to spin up and have instant response when you need it. Particularly at low speeds.

When you're doing low-speed riding, you can let it sit in first gear and just trundle along, but if you need to turn, or for whatever reason you need a bit of speed in order to "pick the bike up" and keep it from falling over, you're out of luck. You can open the throttle, but by the time you've opened the throttle, the air starts to flow through the carbs, which starts to draw more gas, which starts to speed the engine up...it's too late, you're past the point of no return.

So trail braking while holding the clutch in the friction zone is the answer. Lightly drag the rear brake, which engages the suspension and keeps it "taught" and makes the bike easier to control. Slip the clutch, use the throttle to hold the engine at around 1500 RPM or so, and adjust your speed not by using the throttle or brake, but by using the clutch. If you're going too fast, pull the clutch in a bit. If you need some instant "pick up" speed, let the clutch out a bit, and the power is there instantly - no waiting - because the engine is already sped up.

Oh, and if (when) you do drop the bike, don't try to save it. You can seriously injure yourself trying to "save" a bike that can easily weigh over a thousand pounds - many people have done it, injuring backs, pulling tendons, even breaking bones. If (when) it gets to the "point of no return," just get off and get out of the way. You don't want your half-ton bike coming down on your leg. Wings are engineered not to roll over all the way - they will stop at about a 45 degree angle, resting on their crash bars, and little or no damage will be done.

And then:





Oh, and as for the center stand: Have a look at this: viewtopic.php?f=15&t=9476

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bjatwood
Posts: 363
Joined: Wed Jun 27, 2012 10:19 am
Location: Blair, Nebraska
Motorcycle: 1998 GL1500 SE
1973 CB750 K3
1970 CT70-HKO

Re: Relatively new user

Postby bjatwood » Mon Feb 04, 2013 1:24 pm

Very good advice. I went from a CB750 to the Wing. About a 500 lbs difference it weight and alot bigger bike. The best advice I can give is to ride it and get used to the bike and what kind of tendacitys it has at slow speed, turning and braking before having the better-half get on it for a ride..
My .02 worth 8-)

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Mag
Posts: 1298
Joined: Sun Mar 25, 2012 11:58 am
Location: Silverlake, WA
Motorcycle: 1982 Yamaha Venture (Crashed/Sold)
1982 1100 Silver Goldwing (sold)
1989 1500 Beige Goldwing (sold)
1988 1500 Beige Goldwing (current ride)

Re: Relatively new user

Postby Mag » Mon Feb 04, 2013 1:30 pm

I never knew the skill called "Trail Braking" but this is how I learned...on a wing (an 82). I just joined GWTA and Felix, a great guy, was a "large bike instructor" through the regional classes. He taught me a lot regarding how to move such a large bike. And when I went from that 82 to the 89 with the low center, I was able to handle that bigger bike with ease.

Practice practice practice, all the time. There is always an empty spot in a parking lot.

User avatar
seldonca
Posts: 44
Joined: Sun Jun 17, 2012 1:47 pm
Location: Neepawa, Manitoba
Motorcycle: 1982 Aspencade
1984 Magna V30

Re: Relatively new user

Postby seldonca » Mon Feb 04, 2013 1:35 pm

I wasn't planning on riding two up before I had plenty of seat time, I agree there's no substitute for practice.




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