advise for a newbie


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LDodge
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advise for a newbie

Postby LDodge » Sat Jun 29, 2013 8:54 am



Hi all --
I just recently got my first bike (and '85 Aspy) and LOVE it :P :P. Right now I am having a mechanic put on a poor boy conversion as I accidently blew the stator (not a good idea to jump a motorcycle battery with a car battery -- I learned that the hard way :( )

I have two questions that I would appreciate ANY thoughts advise on:

1.) As I know everyone says it is a good idea to stay off loose gravel / dirt (reeks havoc on the chome:) ), but unfortunately I live down a 3 mile dirt road. Any thoughts on how best to negotiate this type of road (which tires are recommended, suspension settings, etc) would be GREAT.
2.) As I have children that can' t wait to ride on dad's Wing (the wife is still a bit apprehensive :( ), how do I ride two up (especially on the wonderful natural road here).

Thanks for all the wonderful ideas, pictures, etc.


Meditation doesn't mean you are sitting still. Enjoy the open road and let the good LORD speak to you (even at 65+mph) ;)

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themainviking
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Re: advise for a newbie

Postby themainviking » Sat Jun 29, 2013 4:39 pm

My advice for the road is - hold on to the handlebars tightly, and ride slightly slower than you would normally. As far as the two up - learn to ride one up well before taking your children down that dirt road. Accidents happen to anyone and everyone, so there is no sense to adding victims. There really isn't any trick to riding on dirt or gravel roads. You just need to learn how. As far as the gravel and rocks damaging the chrome - tires with aggressive or deep tread will pick up rocks and throw them, but you need good tread to ride the bike, so suck it up. You may get some chips. That's life. As they say sometimes - "Into every life a little rocks must fall" Hawwwwwww, hahahahahahahaha, snork, wheeze :mrgreen:
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Mag
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Re: advise for a newbie

Postby Mag » Sat Jun 29, 2013 11:40 pm

Yup, what Viking said on both counts...
- Gravel - I have a long gravel driveway, like driving on a waterbed with the front wheel being really slippery. Stay straight up, have consistent speed, get confident.
- Kids - I have an autistic 15 year old, he loves to ride. I insist me being very confident first before taking a passenger, kid, wife, anyone else. Of course, passenger must wear jacket, jeans, gloves, helmet....mandatory. Once I got confident, easy to bring them along. I found my kids easy to learn how to ride, especially on a wing because it is so big.

Good luck, enjoy the new ride.

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WingAdmin
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Re: advise for a newbie

Postby WingAdmin » Sun Jun 30, 2013 10:47 pm

I have to disagree about the gravel/dirt roads. Rather than holding on with a death grip, I find it's better to hold on normally, and actually let my arms be loose, let the bike do what it wants to do (within reason). Trying to fight every small movement of the steering as the front wheel hits ruts, gravel, dirt, whatever, will do nothing except make you tired. Take it easy, don't get too slow, and just guide the bike in the direction you want it to go.

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Bogator
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Re: advise for a newbie

Postby Bogator » Mon Jul 01, 2013 5:26 am

I agree with admin, relaaaaaxxx ride the way u won't to ----not all tensed up, you will find that the more u ride the easyer it is - spellin on easyer mite not be rite , but who cares, u know what I mean.any way this is suppose to be fun, ----GOD BLESS
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Spook1800
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Re: advise for a newbie

Postby Spook1800 » Mon Jul 01, 2013 6:02 am

WingAdmin wrote:I have to disagree about the gravel/dirt roads. Rather than holding on with a death grip, I find it's better to hold on normally, and actually let my arms be loose, let the bike do what it wants to do (within reason). Trying to fight every small movement of the steering as the front wheel hits ruts, gravel, dirt, whatever, will do nothing except make you tired. Take it easy, don't get too slow, and just guide the bike in the direction you want it to go.

I concur. Just let the bike move about a bit and maintain control of the overall situation by loosely.....well, what the bloke above said. :)
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dingdong
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Re: advise for a newbie

Postby dingdong » Mon Jul 01, 2013 7:19 am

Before you think about putting your kids on the bike make sure "you" are confident riding solo on gravel. Then put your wife on for a while and practice your two up skills. Don't take the risk with the kids. Sorry about the damage with the car battery jump!
Tom

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Re: advise for a newbie

Postby bustedwing » Mon Jul 01, 2013 8:57 pm

I agree about riding on gravel, just take it slow and more or less guide the bike in the general direction, try to stay out of potholes and ruts, and watch for soft spots that can throw you. One idea for the rocks is put a longer mudflap on to keep more rocks from being thrown.
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twostrokes48
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Re: advise for a newbie

Postby twostrokes48 » Thu Jul 04, 2013 2:30 pm

Another agreement with Admin.....Dirt/gravel roads have their own way about them. Pretty much let the bike choose its path somewhere on your side of the road. Don't make any quick corrections that will cause the front wheel to loose traction and keep your speed up fast enough for the bike to have its natural balance. Go real easy using the front brake, again you don't want it to slide out from under you. After some practice you will be as confident as you are on dry pavement. Actually I fear wet slick asphalt more than I do gravel. Keep the kids off until you have absolute confidence.

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themainviking
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Re: advise for a newbie

Postby themainviking » Thu Jul 04, 2013 8:39 pm

WingAdmin wrote:I have to disagree about the gravel/dirt roads. Rather than holding on with a death grip, I find it's better to hold on normally, and actually let my arms be loose, let the bike do what it wants to do (within reason). Trying to fight every small movement of the steering as the front wheel hits ruts, gravel, dirt, whatever, will do nothing except make you tired. Take it easy, don't get too slow, and just guide the bike in the direction you want it to go.


And with your experience, I totally agree. Without your experience, a person still has to learn how to ride on gravel, and without the death grip there is a huge opportunity to let the handlebars be pulled right out of a persons hands. I am willing to agree to disagree.
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motorhead1977
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Re: advise for a newbie

Postby motorhead1977 » Sat Jul 06, 2013 6:20 am

I have to agree with wingadmin too. Death grip on the bars makes every tiny movement of your arms/hands translate into movement of the front wheel - in dirt/gravel this is not a good thing. Keep a regular grip as you do on pavement as advised, RELAX and allow your arms to be "loose". A twitchy front wheel will only make you not only tired but more apprehensive as the bike will fell all the more unstable. It is a task that takes patience to master but well worth it in the end. Try practicing letting the front wheel have a bit of it's own head without just letting it go wherever it wants on a bicycle in the dirt. Safer and less expensive if you dump the bicycle.

As far as taking your kids/wife - FIRST - ATGATT!!! All the gear all the time (even when it is hot and humid). The least you can do for them is minimize the risk of injury as much as possible. Second - get at least one season of riding behind you before you take any passenger. That first year is the most mishap prone. I know the kids will not be happy but they do not understand the risks involved. I refused to put any of my kids on a bike with me except for short rides up the street (pavement) until they were teens. I did not feel it was a good thing to put youngsters in the risk of MC riding when all they could think of was how much fun it could be. Perhaps you can tell them it is like when they first learned to ride their bicycles and weren't as good at it as they are now? Good luck, safe riding and once you are more experienced, have fun with your family.
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redial
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Re: advise for a newbie

Postby redial » Sun Jul 07, 2013 12:12 am

I think I have mentioned these before, the three rules of being a pillon:
    1. Obey instructions, especially when to get on/off;
    2. Keep the feet on the pegs at all times; and,
    3. Hang on and stay still, especially going around bends and corners. Go with the flow, and dont lean before the driver.

These items are necessary because the wrong movement at the wrong time can upset the balance. As someone else has pointed out, ATGATT for both rider and passenger. Dont speed or 'hoon' as you want the experience to be pleasant, not terrifying. Let them get used to the feeling on a motorcycle, that it is different.


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