slick teflon


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futhashi
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slick teflon

Postby futhashi » Sat Oct 12, 2013 11:03 pm



Hi,

Just like almost all older 4 wheel vehicles I have bought, I have added a liter of “Slick 50 Plus - for older engines” to my first oil change. I have just bought a 1982 GL1100 Interstate with 132,000 kilometers. I am wondering if I can do this safely with this bike even if it is only for a few kilometers and then change the oil to regular motorcycle oil. Another question is if I can still do this if the bike has been running synthetic oil? Looking forward to any thoughts on this.

Thanks ,
A



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RoadRogue
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Re: slick teflon

Postby RoadRogue » Sun Oct 13, 2013 1:45 am

While the Slick50 may not do any harm to an older car or truck engine you will find that because the bike has a wet clutch, meaning that the clutch plates run in the same oil as the rest of your engine and tranny do, that you will more than likely end up causing the clutch to slip under load. These engines are very well built and with proper maintenance and oil changes last for 250-300,000 miles easily. So please don't add any "friction modifiers to your oil. Synthetic is fine but so are the dino oils as long as they meet or exceed the manufactures recommended oil. I like to use Cheverons Dello 400LE diesel rated oil in 15w40, others have their own favorites and will be happy to tell you why theirs is the best. Everyone pretty much agrees that friction modifiers are a bad idea in a bike with a wet clutch. 8-)
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dingdong
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Re: slick teflon

Postby dingdong » Sun Oct 13, 2013 6:38 am

Absolutely do not add oil "slick" modifiers of any kind. The way your post reads you may have already added it. If so drain asap.
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futhashi
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Re: slick teflon

Postby futhashi » Sun Oct 13, 2013 7:48 am

nope, have not added it yet, that is why I am asking for this advice. Thanks for this. Will not use the slick 50. Also is it true that once a bike has changed to synthetic oil that you have to keep using it? Appreciate you thoughts.

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Re: slick teflon

Postby cbx4evr » Sun Oct 13, 2013 8:08 am

futhashi wrote: Also is it true that once a bike has changed to synthetic oil that you have to keep using it? Appreciate you thoughts.


No. The two are interchangeable but if it's been running on synthetic for 132,000km., why change? When I buy a used vehicle one of the first questions I ask is what oil it's on.
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Re: slick teflon

Postby littlebeaver » Sun Oct 13, 2013 11:08 am

So seafoam would be a better choice , right?

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RoadRogue
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Re: slick teflon

Postby RoadRogue » Sun Oct 13, 2013 4:59 pm

Seafoam is a solvent that will clean the inside of your engine by disolving the crud that has built up over the years. Add it to your fuel to clean the carbs and even some carbon deposits in your cylinders or add it to your oil to wash out the sludge from the crank case that mcan build up over the years from poor maintanance and prolonged oil change intervals.
You can happily go back and forth from dino oil to synthetic all you want, you could even mix them if you had to without doing any harm to the engine, tranny or clutch. JUST AS LONG AS YOU DONT ADD FRICTION MODIFIERS.
Beware some oils contain friction modifiers and are listed on the label if you know where to look.there is a circle or "donut" that has API info listed as long as the bottom portion of the donut is blank and there is no mention of " energy conserving" you wont harm your clutch. 8-)
Ride safe, Todd
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silverado6x6
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Re: slick teflon

Postby silverado6x6 » Sun Oct 13, 2013 5:18 pm

Reminds me of a Goldwing owner who rides into my shop, I notice a lot of dirt on his front brake rotor and oil all over it, he tells me the brakes were squeaking so he sprayed WD40 on the rotors.Now if a person had say a Ducati with I believe a dry clutch then you could use additives, or a bike with a separate engine and transmission. But a shared engine/trans setup requires a high shear oil such as used in heavy machinery or more directly diesel engines, and over time clutch material will stay in the oil clogging up a filter screen, so if anything change often and a dose of Seafoam every other oil change on an older engine will help to remove sludge.
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themainviking
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Re: slick teflon

Postby themainviking » Sun Oct 13, 2013 5:59 pm

RoadRogue wrote:You can happily go back and forth from dino oil to synthetic all you want, you could even mix them if you had to without doing any harm to the engine, tranny or clutch.


Just remember that any benefits as to extended oil drain periods that you might have been expecting by using synthetics should be disregarded the minute dino oils are mixed in. I do not believe in extended drain intervals with motorcycles in any event. Every 5000 miles or 8000 kilometers is my interval even with long life synthetics.
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aladdin
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Re: slick teflon

Postby aladdin » Sun Oct 13, 2013 7:23 pm

I have a GL1200 (1987). This bike had done around 100,000 miles when I got it a year ago, and I did not know how recently it had been serviced. As it was only going to be a temporary bike to ease me back into it as it were, I did not want to do an oil change and service, so I added Moreys Heavy Duty oil Stabiliser to my engine oil when i first got it - this stuff is really thick and very slippery, and stops engine wear almost completely. I noticed that gear changes got notably clunkier, especially into first and second.
Since this bike goes remarkably well and I cannot find a new bike that is as smooth or more comfortable, I have started modifying and upgrading the old girl. That included a full service. The gear changing is a lot smoother again. I never noticed any effect on the clutch, but I'm not into racing :P I do ride two up a lot, total weigh around 400 without luggage.

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Re: slick teflon

Postby WingAdmin » Sun Oct 13, 2013 10:13 pm

Keep in mind that the engine oil in your motorcycle is also used to lubricate the transmission - a job normally left to gear oil. Mashing oil molecules between gears breaks up the molecule chains in the oil much faster than running the oil in your car engine, so the oil in your motorcycle will break down a LOT sooner than the equivalent oil in your car. Old oil might not even look dirty, but can be compromised to the point that it is no longer providing adequate lubrication to your engine/transmission.




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