Scared


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Maddogg
Posts: 150
Joined: Sun Aug 25, 2013 6:58 pm
Location: Fresno, ca.
Motorcycle: 1990 GL1500
1994 Suzuki 800 Intruder

Scared

Postby Maddogg » Thu Oct 31, 2013 11:11 pm



I want to change my timing belts on my GL 1500 this winter. I gathered from this website that it's not that bad if you pay attention to what you are doing. I was just over at the Steve Saunders site and he is recommending that I do not attempt it as my first maintenance project. He also said that is not for beginners. I don't really consider myself a beginner as I have been working on cars and trucks all my life. Not as a job but doing my own work when I can. I guess I'm just looking for a little reassurance that I can do it. I don't want to destroy my engine. I am an A/C and heating contractor so I know my way around a garage. I have never gone this deep into an engine before. Was anybody else out there as hesitant as I am on their first timing belt replacement? Thanks. :?



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redial
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Location: Kapunda, SouthAustralia
Motorcycle: 1997 GL1500 Spectre Red Aspencade

Re: Scared

Postby redial » Fri Nov 01, 2013 1:59 am

I have not done mine, However, just take it slow and steady. Make sure you have all of your jars/tins lined up to put the bits and bobs in that you will accumulate, preferably in jars marked with the origin (like LH front tupperware, etc), so that you know where to look for the re-assembly. Dont be scared, just be careful!
Len in Kapunda

The world is not going to finish today, as it is already tomorrow in Australia and New Zealand, and other islands of foreign nations such as Guam and Samoa.

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rescue1042
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Location: Hutchinson Mn
Motorcycle: 1982 honda goldwing interstate
1998 honda 1500 SE
2002 honda Gl1800

Re: Scared

Postby rescue1042 » Fri Nov 01, 2013 8:40 am

if ya follow the the pic on hear under timing belt replace it looks ok to do it looks like to me its just more taking of the shields that is harder lol jk just more stuff to take off
2002 GL1800
I dont always ride!
But when i do it's on a Goldwing!!

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Pam
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Motorcycle: 1982 Kawazaki KZ 1100 1983 Yamaha Venture Royal (sold and miss it) 2006 Goldwing GL1800 1992 Yamaha Virago

Re: Scared

Postby Pam » Fri Nov 01, 2013 9:45 am

There is an article in the 1500 DIY section on timing belts. Looks like the big thing will be getting to the belts through the Tupperware.

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Fiberthree
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Motorcycle: Black 1999 GL1500SE

Re: Scared

Postby Fiberthree » Fri Nov 01, 2013 12:35 pm

It's only as difficult as you make it.
Ed

WARNING: All posts are subject to influence from an uncontrollable dominant sarcastic gene. Offensive remarks may or may not be intentional.

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smilam
Posts: 56
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Location: Olathe Ks
Motorcycle: 2009 GL1800 With a Roadsmith Trike Conversion

Re: Scared

Postby smilam » Fri Nov 01, 2013 10:00 pm

I did mine for the first time last winter and also questioned whether or not I should attempt it. It was no problem as I followed the information on this site. Just make sure you double check everything and don't rush. My biggest concern was getting the tension of the belts correct since I have back problems and a torn rotator cuff. Getting down on the floor and putting tension on the belts and measuring the deflection was litteraly a pain. With your background you should have no problem. Good luck.
Steve

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Dusty Boots
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Joined: Mon Oct 26, 2009 4:25 pm
Location: Alvinston, SW ON
Motorcycle: 1992 GL1500Aspencade

Re: Scared

Postby Dusty Boots » Sat Nov 02, 2013 5:50 am

I've changed out the belts on my bike twice and it's no biggie, just take your time and follow the directions, double checking as you go. No better way of getting to know your bike! :ugeek:

Toughest part of the whole procedure (I find) is step 95 in this guide. Sometimes takes some fiddling around to get the marks lined up just right.

Also helps if you support the front of the bike and completely remove the front wheel/fender, as it gives you better access/vision to what you're working on. ;)

Amazon dot com has about the best price on a pair (you need 2 of them) of Gates T275 timing belts, which is what I install on mine.










Dusty

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Fatwing Chris
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Location: Ont.,Canada
Motorcycle: 2004 ABS Model Goldwing

Re: Scared

Postby Fatwing Chris » Sat Nov 02, 2013 6:32 am

Good thing is that you're doing your first set of belts on the easiest of all the Wings to do it on.All the previous Wings were more of a pain to get to IMHO.
If I'da known it would last this long,I'da taken better care of it.
Chris
Double Dark
Darkside # 1602

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motorhead1977
Posts: 75
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Location: Albany, New York
Motorcycle: 2009 GL 1800 ABS, 2015 Ducati Scrambler 800, 1986 VFR 700

Re: Scared

Postby motorhead1977 » Sat Nov 02, 2013 6:45 am

As has already been said - TAKE YOUR TIME - and label everything you remove so you will be able to know where it goes on re-assembly. Putting bolts etc into marked up baggies had always worked well for me. Take pictures before dis-assembly of each component section if you think that will help on the reverse end of the project. It really is all about attention to detail. I began changing timing belts when I was a kid (teens) and had twin cam FIAT sports cars. Some of those were interference engines so if it was done wrong......kaboom (no pressure there hehe). Since you have mechanical aptitude you should be fine with the guides available here. You may want to get a copy of the correct section from the Honda shop manual just for paper back up and something to get greasy finger prints on while working. :lol: I choose to pay my local dealer who has a superb shop to do my work now, but that is out of time constraints and laziness, not lack of ability. It is definitely a doable chore. Enjoy the experience.
"When fascism comes to America it will be draped in the flag and carrying the cross." Sinclair Lewis

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Maddogg
Posts: 150
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Location: Fresno, ca.
Motorcycle: 1990 GL1500
1994 Suzuki 800 Intruder

Re: Scared

Postby Maddogg » Sun Nov 03, 2013 2:11 pm

Ok, guys. You have given me the confidence to give it a try. But I do have another question. I have been looking at some other posts from this site, and I keep seeing something about the slave cylinder. Is this something that I should be looking at when I do the belts. What is the slave cylinder and what does it do? Also, the belt tensioners. Should I replace those at the same time I do the belts. I can't seem to get in touch with the guy I bought the bike from so I don't know what kind of work was previously done. The tensioners are about $75 each, and I don't want to put out that kind of money if I don't need to. The bike has 83,500 miles on it. Is there any way to tell from looking if the belts have been replaced? Thanks guys.

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JDMAG
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Location: martin TN
Motorcycle: 1980 GL1100I Interstate

Re: Scared

Postby JDMAG » Sun Nov 03, 2013 6:27 pm

You can do it. I say this because I had a mechanic friend do mine. As I watched and printed out the instructions from this site. The next time, it will just be me. I was overly concerned as you are. But I think I can handle it the next time. And you probably can too. :)

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wilmo
Posts: 162
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Location: Ogden, Utah
Motorcycle: 1994 Goldwing SE Blue-the fastest color
2005 Yamaha Majesty 400

Re: Scared

Postby wilmo » Sun Nov 03, 2013 6:46 pm

You can do this. It's not as scary as it sounds. But you don't realize this until after you've completed the job. I was apprehensive, too, but if you read through the tutorials 2-3 times first, it isn't that bad. As far as the tensioners go, when you have the belts removed, feel them for roughness. Usually, you don't have to replace them. While you're in there you'll be able to see the splines for the water pump. Try to wiggle them laterally with your fingers. If there's movement, you may want to consider replacing it.
Take the time to mark the gears when you get everything lined up before you remove the belts. Mark them with chalk or something similar or even fingernail polish. When you release the right belt, that cam will jump-don't panic. Just line it back up before you put the belt back on. All the while keep checking the T1 mark for alinement. TAKE YOUR TIME.

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Fatwing Chris
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Motorcycle: 2004 ABS Model Goldwing

Re: Scared

Postby Fatwing Chris » Mon Nov 04, 2013 11:29 am

Maddogg wrote:Ok, guys. You have given me the confidence to give it a try. But I do have another question. I have been looking at some other posts from this site, and I keep seeing something about the slave cylinder. Is this something that I should be looking at when I do the belts. What is the slave cylinder and what does it do? Also, the belt tensioners. Should I replace those at the same time I do the belts. I can't seem to get in touch with the guy I bought the bike from so I don't know what kind of work was previously done. The tensioners are about $75 each, and I don't want to put out that kind of money if I don't need to. The bike has 83,500 miles on it. Is there any way to tell from looking if the belts have been replaced? Thanks guys.

If they have been replaced before and the PO marked everything you might still see his marks,but you still won't know how old they are.Any of the belts I've done still looked pretty good,but if you're in there that far I would replace them anyway.Tensioners usually don't require replacement.Just see how they feel while you're in there.If they feel rough then get rid of them.
If I'da known it would last this long,I'da taken better care of it.
Chris
Double Dark
Darkside # 1602

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thrasherg
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Location: Plano, TX
Motorcycle: 2004 GL1800, 2005 Honda Shadow 750, 2008 Yamaha R6 with RG500 engine, CRF450X, CRF230, CRF250X, XR200, CR500

Re: Scared

Postby thrasherg » Mon Nov 04, 2013 11:39 am

The one thing I will stress, once you are done, remove the spark plugs and turn the engine through several rotations by hand. If you got anything wrong, the engine will lock up, or make strange noises, but as you are turning it bu hand, no damage will be done. Once it all turns over by hand without any issue, then put the plugs back in and try to start it up. But NEVER skip the manual turning over of the engine, it can avoid a LOT of expensive damage..

Gary

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wilmo
Posts: 162
Joined: Wed May 02, 2012 10:53 pm
Location: Ogden, Utah
Motorcycle: 1994 Goldwing SE Blue-the fastest color
2005 Yamaha Majesty 400

Re: Scared

Postby wilmo » Mon Nov 04, 2013 5:19 pm

+1 by what Thrashberg says. This is a most important step when you are finished. Do this before you even put the covers back on. Two turns of the cams equal one rev of the engine.




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