Trailer transport chock


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crock4
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Trailer transport chock

Postby crock4 » Wed Nov 13, 2013 9:26 am



Every year My wife, and I travel to Ohio to visit our daughter, and son-in-law. We tow the bike up on a single rail Alumna trailer. I am considering putting a different chock on to hold the front of the bike so I dont have to tie down the front end, and compress the front suspension for such a long time.

My question is, what type or brand have any of you folks used that you like. If I didn't carry so much STUFF I would ride, but thats out.

As far as Goldwings, this forum always has the best information around. So before I go out and spend a bunch of money on something I may not be happy with, thought I would ask you guys first.

Thanks, Bob


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redial
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Re: Trailer transport chock

Postby redial » Sat Nov 16, 2013 11:23 pm

This is only for consideration, no practical experience. What about wrapping the straps around the wheels as well as the front chock? By locking the front into the chock, what is to stop the bike from moving side to side. Given that the channels for the wheels will stop a little of that movement, but what happens when you hit a big bump? - not noticeable in the tug, but really noticeable in the trailer.

These are just thoughts of mine, so I am just relating to the method of how I tow my Forester on the trailer behind the RV.
Len in Kapunda

The world is not going to finish today, as it is already tomorrow in Australia and New Zealand, and other islands of foreign nations such as Guam and Samoa.

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crock4
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2001 harley softail deuce Sold
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2010 Honda Stateline

Re: Trailer transport chock

Postby crock4 » Sun Nov 17, 2013 8:53 am

Thanks for the post. What I am really trying to do is not compress the forks, and I have read that some of the chocks not only secure the bike, but keep it in an upright position without pulling down on the front end. While strapping the front end would keep it on the chock it wouldn't keep it from tipping. :(

Bob
Passion keeps your blood flowing and your heart beating. Motorcycles are my passion !

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redial
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Re: Trailer transport chock

Postby redial » Sun Nov 17, 2013 6:39 pm

Perhaps I didnt express myself clearly. The Gold Book (ex GWRRA) shows how to tie down a GW for trailering; BUT, I, like you, do not like the idea of compressing the springs. I prefer to keep the wheels steady, and let the mc springs do their job. My idea was to strap the front wheel to the chock on the trailer, and then strap the rear wheel to the sides of the trailer. The angles of the straps from the rear wheel to the sides should be about 30degrees.

Make sure the straps are rated for the job, and I work on the principle of nothing is too big for this type of job. You need to check the straps after the first ten miles/kilometers, retensioning and making sure the bike has not moved. Also check the straps and the bike every two hours, as well as keeping an eye on it via the rear vision mirrors.

When tying off the straps to the trailer, always make sure that the side that is the one to tighten is always away from the traffic (in NAmerica it would be the right hand side; and for the people that drive on the correct side of the road, it is the left side 8-) ).

Make sure the trailer and tug are capable of towing the weight, and once hooked up, take a quiet drive around the block to see how it handles the bumps and corners before taking it for an Interstate test. It would be handy to have someone follow you to make sure that the bike sits well on the trailer and that you do not fish tail. You should check the tongue weight, with bathroom scales or some other means of weighing, so that you only have about ten percent or so, of the weight on the drawbar. Check the lighting each time you hook the trailer up, and at the start of each day.

Here endeth the lesson for today :P
Len in Kapunda

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Re: Trailer transport chock

Postby WingAdmin » Mon Nov 18, 2013 9:40 am

redial wrote:Perhaps I didnt express myself clearly. The Gold Book (ex GWRRA) shows how to tie down a GW for trailering; BUT, I, like you, do not like the idea of compressing the springs. I prefer to keep the wheels steady, and let the mc springs do their job. My idea was to strap the front wheel to the chock on the trailer, and then strap the rear wheel to the sides of the trailer. The angles of the straps from the rear wheel to the sides should be about 30degrees.


If you think about it, when you and your passenger are sitting on it with stuff in the bags, the springs are compressed - and they are still "doing their job." Compressing the springs with straps when it is on the trailer is doing exactly the same thing - and prevents the bike's suspension from slamming into the stops every time the bike gets unloaded over a bump.

Incidentally, anyone see the advertisement in the GWRRA magazine for Rescue Plus? There is an example of how NOT to tie a bike down. Front wheel attached to the winch, back wheel attached to the flatbed with a strap, pulling the wheels apart - say goodbye to your front suspension after it's been transported like this! Not to mention tiedown straps over top of the seat, which will quickly mar and destroy it as well. What a terrible picture to put in the advertisement - makes me NEVER want to purchase Rescue Plus:

Terrible Rescue Plus tiedown
Terrible Rescue Plus tiedown

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redial
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Re: Trailer transport chock

Postby redial » Tue Nov 19, 2013 12:47 am

If you think about it, when you and your passenger are sitting on it with stuff in the bags, the springs are compressed - and they are still "doing their job." Compressing the springs with straps when it is on the trailer is doing exactly the same thing - and prevents the bike's suspension from slamming into the stops every time the bike gets unloaded over a bump.


Further to our discussion, when you consider that the bike moving down the highway or low-way gets to exercise the suspension, with or without a load. When it is loaded, the suspension is 'loaded' and does not have as much travel from which to recover. But going down the highway/low-way with the straps tied strongly, so that there is no freedom to move, means that the suspension takes the full jarring of any bumps and lumps it encounters.

In these circumstances, there are no opportunities for the suspension to exercise, so the full force of the bumps and lumps are transmitted directly. The suspension cannot do its job as intended, that is, to carry a load and 'bounce' through the impefections of the road. This way the suspension is doing what it was designed to do.

As for stretching the wheels, what happens when a force, eg a pothole, is encountered, the suspension is 'stressed' by one of Newton's laws. Whereas, if the wheels are not moving, but the body is allowed to 'float', everything should be doing what it was designed to do, except for the wheels not moving. From memory, you have fitted a brace to the front, to impede the effects of hitting lumps and bumps in the road, and to improve the handling. What is wrong with tying the front and rear wheels, so that the bike is allowed to 'bounce' as it should?


Len in Kapunda

The world is not going to finish today, as it is already tomorrow in Australia and New Zealand, and other islands of foreign nations such as Guam and Samoa.


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