How important is keeping it stock


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linkbelt
Posts: 11
Joined: Sat Sep 13, 2014 11:55 am
Location: Hamilton ontario Canada
Motorcycle: 1980 GL1100 Interstate
1973 CB500Four (First Bike)

How important is keeping it stock

Postby linkbelt » Thu Sep 18, 2014 5:17 am



I have a buddy who is a mechanic, owns a motorcycle speed shop and is a complete "Wing Nut".
When I had a problem with my rear master (the cir-clip that holds the plunger in fell out) he built up the inside edge of the bore with weld, machined it and cut in a new groove for the cir-clip. You want to keep it original he said, after market is a last resort. He winced when I said I might put Stainless Steel brake lines on. My '80 Interstate is in great shape, not showroom but all the original pin stripping and chrome is still on it, no after market goodies. The odometer reads 34,100 kms but it could be 134,000 or 234,000 for all I know.
How important is it to keep it stock? Would putting good used parts from an 81-83 affect its value? appeal? I would like to give it a custom paint job and such but maybe I should look for a project bike that's rough and mess with that one and keep this one "as shipped".
Looking forward to hearing opinions on this.
Thanks



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HawkeyeGL1200
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Location: Courtland, Va.
Motorcycle: 1984 GL1200 Interstate
1981 GL1100 Interstate

Re: How important is keeping it stock

Postby HawkeyeGL1200 » Thu Sep 18, 2014 6:59 am

I guess opinions will vary, but if whatever change you make works properly, is SAFE, and is sustainable, I don't see the necessity of keeping YOUR motorcycle stock. It is yours, afterall, and it has to please you.

If you are trying to restore a "classic" motorcycle to show it or sell it, that's a horse of a different color all together.
I am wrong as often as I am right concerning what is wrong with someone else' motorcycle without having seen the machine in person. Guessing with limited information, as to the source of the trouble, is sketchy at best.

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dingdong
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1993 gl1500
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Re: How important is keeping it stock

Postby dingdong » Thu Sep 18, 2014 7:12 am

Who's motorcycle is this? As said, unless you are building a show bike that you will never ride then make it yours. The braided lines are a plus for safety which makes them a good thing.
Tom

A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.

colemadad
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Location: Moncton, NB
Motorcycle: 1983 GL1100I Interstate

Re: How important is keeping it stock

Postby colemadad » Thu Sep 18, 2014 7:36 am

I think what a person does to their bike is their affair. I have to admit though I shake my head when people paint landscapes or stallions and eagles all over their machine and then try to sell it. Same thing with putting 3K worth of chrome on a 3K bike and expecting to get their money out of it. If you're going to keep your bike I say fill your boots but if you plan on selling give some thought to that too. Ride safe guys and gals!

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golden highway
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Joined: Mon Dec 31, 2012 9:23 am
Location: Louisville, Kentucky
Motorcycle: 1987 Interstate
1998 Aspencade

Re: How important is keeping it stock

Postby golden highway » Thu Sep 18, 2014 8:59 am

Sometimes after market parts are better and sometimes the OEM are. Me I like to ride so my bike usually has road grime on it and if it is broken I use whatever gets it back on the road quickly, safely and reliably.

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themainviking
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Location: North Bay, Ontario, Canada
Motorcycle: 2009 GL1800 AD

Re: How important is keeping it stock

Postby themainviking » Thu Sep 18, 2014 9:14 am

My opinion is that keeping it original - if it is really nice - makes it more saleable as a collectors piece, however, the year and the age do not necessarily make it so. In some cases the age just makes it older or even old. If it is for riding, then do what makes you happy. If it is for sale, then do what makes it worth more money. I have friends who restore older bikes and none of them ever get what they think their "antiques" are worth. I have never owned an "antique", just old bikes that I like to ride. Seeing as they ain't for sale, no one should care what I put on them, or in them.
It ain't about the destination - it's all about the journey

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WingAdmin
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Location: Strongsville, OH
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1982 GL1100A Aspencade (sold)
1989 PC800 (wife's!)
1998 XV250 Virago (sold)
2007 Aspen Sentry Trailer

Re: How important is keeping it stock

Postby WingAdmin » Thu Sep 18, 2014 11:46 am

A Frankenbike with all kinds of non-stock parts fitted because a previous owner couldn't find replacements (i.e. brake calipers from a Suzuki, modified shocks to adapt to non-standard something or other) makes the bike much harder to maintain and therefore hurts resale value.

If you are planning on showing your bike, and the bike is in show condition, then sure, go wild trying to find original parts to keep your bike in stock condition.

However, when it comes to things like brake lines, I have no problem replacing the stock items with something (i.e. stainless braided lines) that makes the bike perform better - and in my opinion, look better. The replacement of the brake lines on my GL1100 with stainless braided lines was the single best upgrade I did to my bike. It transformed the brakes, made them strong and razor sharp instead of mushy and vague, and made the bike much safer as a result.

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bwagner6
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Location: Norwalk, Ohio
Motorcycle: 1986 Gl1200A Aspencade

Re: How important is keeping it stock

Postby bwagner6 » Thu Sep 18, 2014 1:15 pm

My 2 cents.... I too am one for keeping my old girl stock. I "show" my bike every time I leave the garage as I am a freak when it comes to polish and wax. I have always wondered how all the extra lights, chrome and gadgets affect the ride and handling as the frame, suspension and electrical systems were designed for the stock bike. As far as resale value goes time will tell... 8-)

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Fatwing Chris
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Motorcycle: 2004 ABS Model Goldwing

Re: How important is keeping it stock

Postby Fatwing Chris » Thu Sep 18, 2014 5:28 pm

colemadad wrote:I think what a person does to their bike is their affair. I have to admit though I shake my head when people paint landscapes or stallions and eagles all over their machine and then try to sell it. Same thing with putting 3K worth of chrome on a 3K bike and expecting to get their money out of it. If you're going to keep your bike I say fill your boots but if you plan on selling give some thought to that too. Ride safe guys and gals!


I totally agree.Just because you think it looks like a million dollars doesn't mean that anyone else in the world feels the same way.To me it really limits your prospective buyers.If you're not ever thinking about selling then it's yours,have at her.As far as shiny stuff,I'd be more apt to look at a bike that had a $1000 aftermarket seat on it than a bike with $3000 worth of useless chrome.JMHO.
If I'da known it would last this long,I'da taken better care of it.
Chris
Double Dark
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HawkeyeGL1200
Posts: 918
Joined: Sat Jul 05, 2014 11:53 am
Location: Courtland, Va.
Motorcycle: 1984 GL1200 Interstate
1981 GL1100 Interstate

Re: How important is keeping it stock

Postby HawkeyeGL1200 » Thu Sep 18, 2014 5:40 pm

One of the things that nearly breaks my heart is the current trend of taking beautiful old motorcycles and turning them into JUNK... "Bobbers" is what they all call 'em. I don't go for that at all. What I meant by my comments earlier was, if a riders has a 30 year old bike, and the fuel pump craps out, then I don't see where it is sacrilege to use a different fuel pump to replace the OEM. Same thing with coils and such.

I still stand by my "it's yours, do what you want to it" even if includes chopping to pieces and turning the rear end into a spine jarring hard-tail... if it makes you happy. I just think the original lines of the bikes that so many have modified beyond recognition were far more functional and ride-able than the ugly pieces of trash most of these so called custom bikes are turned into. There have been several that I have seen that were works of art, that were an improvement on the original, but the artisans that created those few have skills that far surpass the far more plentiful shade-tree butcher(s) that seem to think a blow torch, welder, and a couple of cans of flat-black spray paint make for a "custom" motorcycle.
I am wrong as often as I am right concerning what is wrong with someone else' motorcycle without having seen the machine in person. Guessing with limited information, as to the source of the trouble, is sketchy at best.

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WingAdmin
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Posts: 17046
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 4:16 pm
Location: Strongsville, OH
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1982 GL1100A Aspencade (sold)
1989 PC800 (wife's!)
1998 XV250 Virago (sold)
2007 Aspen Sentry Trailer

Re: How important is keeping it stock

Postby WingAdmin » Fri Sep 19, 2014 11:33 am

colemadad wrote:I think what a person does to their bike is their affair. I have to admit though I shake my head when people paint landscapes or stallions and eagles all over their machine and then try to sell it. Same thing with putting 3K worth of chrome on a 3K bike and expecting to get their money out of it. If you're going to keep your bike I say fill your boots but if you plan on selling give some thought to that too. Ride safe guys and gals!


Incidentally, ordinary oven cleaner will usually take that air-brushed "artwork" off a bike without harming the original base coat of paint, as long as it hasn't been clear coated over top of the air-brushed work.

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Iaustin
Posts: 96
Joined: Thu Jun 07, 2012 11:31 pm
Location: Red Deer, Alberta, Canada
Motorcycle: 1986 gl1200 interstate

Re: How important is keeping it stock

Postby Iaustin » Fri Sep 19, 2014 11:07 pm

i think as long as it makes you happy and its safe,you should do .i like to keep mine looking close to stock,with lots of chrome add ons. recently elected to go with jobber stator instead of poor boy conversion.

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Happytrails
Posts: 653
Joined: Wed Sep 04, 2013 6:13 pm
Location: Tarentum, Pennsylvania
Motorcycle: 1991 Goldwing 1500 SE

Re: How important is keeping it stock

Postby Happytrails » Mon Sep 22, 2014 1:17 am

Overpersonalizing a bike can make it more harder to make the sale. I thinks its the shame when see a bike a year or so old that has been painted on and owner is selling. I been looking for the 2nd bike and I skip the bikes that look to personalize and or wrecked. See some nice looking bikes with an R titles.


1991 GL1500 SE Anniversary Edition
Sun Flare Gold Metallic
Vallant Brown Inset


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