Tire safety


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Bobet
Posts: 3
Joined: Sun Sep 28, 2014 11:07 am
Location: Madison, Mississippi
Motorcycle: 2013 GL 1800

Tire safety

Postby Bobet » Sun Oct 12, 2014 8:17 pm



As I am new to touring, 2013 wing and just closing 2000 miles, embarrassing I know as many of you have 00000's but works gets in the way of fun sometimes. My wife and I ride two up on the weekend and as she is new to riding one of her main concerns IS a tire blow out. This weekend there was an accident on the interstate where a back tire blew on a bike with two up and the driver survived but the passenger didn't. I have been watching other blogs and one of the interesting conversations Has been about the use of automotive tires on a wing. So I have two questions. 1. How often should you change your tire and 2, is there anything such as a run flat tire from the dark side that can help? Thanks



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HawkeyeGL1200
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Location: Courtland, Va.
Motorcycle: 1984 GL1200 Interstate
1981 GL1100 Interstate

Re: Tire safety

Postby HawkeyeGL1200 » Sun Oct 12, 2014 10:13 pm

I change tires when they're worn out. Some change them based on date. I never had a tire that was more than two years old, as far as I can remember, that I didn't wear out. I also never ran a car tire on a motorcycle. The concept appeals to me on some levels, but I am also a little apprehensive as the profile of the bead on a car tire isn't an exact match for the motorcycle rim... that said, plenty of folks run them without incident as far as I can tell.

A run flat tire would certainly afford more safety than a conventional tire. I cannot say how it will handle or feel under you while riding, but I imagine it would be fine.

A well manufactured tire, properly inflated, and monitored probably isn't going to blow out on you... unless you run over a piece of trash in the road of significant size and shape to wreck your tires... Something that destructive is likely going to take out the front tire first, and they don't make a run flat car tire that you can put out there..

You have to do what makes you and your riding companion feel safe.
I am wrong as often as I am right concerning what is wrong with someone else' motorcycle without having seen the machine in person. Guessing with limited information, as to the source of the trouble, is sketchy at best.

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Fiberthree
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Motorcycle: Black 1999 GL1500SE

Re: Tire safety

Postby Fiberthree » Sun Oct 12, 2014 10:15 pm

If you maintain your ride and religiously check the things you should you wont have a problem with motorcycle tires. Most of the dark siders try to justify using a non-motorcycle tire with lower cost/higher mileage excuse. Just keep an eye on your tread and air pressure. Your tire mileage will not be the same as another riders due to the difference in riding style, loads, road conditions, tire brand , and tire compound. My 99 SE has been averaging close to 18,000 before replacement on Dunlop E3s. That is both front and rear and much different than the 1100 I had with K91s that got 15,000 on the rear and 21,000 on the front.
Ed

WARNING: All posts are subject to influence from an uncontrollable dominant sarcastic gene. Offensive remarks may or may not be intentional.

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Mh434
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Location: Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
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Re: Tire safety

Postby Mh434 » Sun Oct 12, 2014 11:47 pm

As the others have said, just keep an eye on your tires & the worst that's ever likely to happen is a slow leak from a nail (had this happen a few weeks ago).

Blowouts seldom occur without the tire showing prior signs of carcass distress. When I check my rear tire's pressure (every week or two), or when I wash the bike, I put it on center stand & slowly rotate the wheel. Any signs of ply separation, bulges, etc. will be immediately obvious, and should be treated as a "change tire before riding, no matter what" indicator. Aside from those issues (same applies to car, truck, and trailer tires, too!), blowouts are less likely than your being hit by lightning & a tree falling on you, both at the same time. I'm FAR more worried about deer (ask me how I know!).

If there was a darkside tire with a round profile like a motorcycle tire, I'd be on 'em in a heartbeat. However, I frequently ride beside & behind a buddy with a darksided Valk, and I've seen the bike behave in strange ways. It's a little spooky watching his bike hop up onto a knife edge of tread corner when he goes into a bend. I guess I've been riding for too many years (45 or so, with around 20 years of that riding professionally) to change readily.

Anyway, just keep an eye on your tires during regular maintenance, and you'll be fine. Ride, and enjoy!

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Fatwing Chris
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Motorcycle: 2004 ABS Model Goldwing

Re: Tire safety

Postby Fatwing Chris » Mon Oct 13, 2014 6:39 am

The biggest reason that most people run a CT is for safety.The fact that some CT's can be had cheaper,not all run cheap CT's and the fact that they last longer secondary,but definitely a bonus.
The problem with rear MT's on a Wing is that when you're running 2-up with the bike loaded you're running pretty much at the load rating limit.Then add a trailer probably over the top.so yes you will have a higher risk of a blow out with MC.As others have said if you keep a really good eye on you MT you'll probably be fine(remember the low load rating).
Saying all that ,I have been running a CT on my 04 all this year and will not likely ever go back to running a MT.Contrary to popular belief there is very little difference in handling(better in most cases),more contact area(yes even cornering)and they don't ever come off of the rim.Guys on the 1800 site have let the air out of a run flat tire and tried to make it slip or come off the rim and neither happened.
I didn't reply to this post to talk anyone into running a CT,but after reading the other posts I felt that if you want to talk CT's you should have someone that actually has experience with them tell you what they will and will not do.
If I'da known it would last this long,I'da taken better care of it.
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Bobet
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Joined: Sun Sep 28, 2014 11:07 am
Location: Madison, Mississippi
Motorcycle: 2013 GL 1800

Re: Tire safety

Postby Bobet » Mon Oct 13, 2014 7:57 am

Thanks for all the great info. One other question if I may as they kinda go hand in hand. If you ever experienced a blow out what was the situation around it? Was the tire in good shape? Hit a bump tread separated etc.

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HawkeyeGL1200
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Location: Courtland, Va.
Motorcycle: 1984 GL1200 Interstate
1981 GL1100 Interstate

Re: Tire safety

Postby HawkeyeGL1200 » Mon Oct 13, 2014 8:01 am

Never had a "blow out" on a motorcycle tire. I've had a few flats, from running over small screws and similar metal objects in the road, but they loss of air was slow, and in most cases, the tire didn't go "down" until some time after I stopped riding. I've had flats on the front and rear, and the only time I was in danger was after experiencing a flat and putting a plug in the tire to enable me to get home. The plug blew out, the tire rapidly deflated, and then the bead broke loose from the rim. That was a ride I'll never forget... and as a result, I keep a lot more focus on the overall condition and inflation of my tires.

Bobet wrote:Thanks for all the great info. One other question if I may as they kinda go hand in hand. If you ever experienced a blow out what was the situation around it? Was the tire in good shape? Hit a bump tread separated etc.
I am wrong as often as I am right concerning what is wrong with someone else' motorcycle without having seen the machine in person. Guessing with limited information, as to the source of the trouble, is sketchy at best.

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themainviking
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Re: Tire safety

Postby themainviking » Mon Oct 13, 2014 8:21 am

I have had a blowout on a motorcycle rear tire. The circumstances are probably pretty close to most that have had this happen. I did not touch any brake controls, and managed to coast to a standstill, although it was real friggin' scary. The tire in question was a Continental Conti Tour, and after it blew, I noticed that I was showing an awful lot of carcass thread, and the motorcycle WAS overloaded. I consider the blowout to have been totally my fault, with my not paying enough attention to the tires while on a long trip. I was lucky enough to have suffered no ill effects, and all that was necessary was to get to where I could get a new tire, and a kind farmer was good enough to haul me and the bike there. It was a good lesson for me, and I have paid a lot more attention to my tires since then.
It ain't about the destination - it's all about the journey

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harvey01
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Location: Henrico, Virginia
Motorcycle: 2004 GL1800

Re: Tire safety

Postby harvey01 » Mon Oct 13, 2014 11:36 am

Bobet,

I applaud you for wanting to make your Wing as safe as possible especially when you wife is riding along.

Motorcycles do require a lot more involvement by the owner/rider than cars or at least it seems that way. Since I am sure you have taken the MSF beginner/advanced course you are familiar with the checklist they recommend before every ride. Tire pressure is on that list and is probably one of the most important things to check.

Most motorcycle tire blowouts have been traced to low air pressure or an over loaded situation as noted above by themainviking. There have also been incidents with tires delaminating or coming apart. Again, close checking and monitoring of the tires will usually prevent this from becoming a problem.

I have over 160,000 miles on a GL1800 with no problems with motorcycle tires but I also will replace a tire if I have any doubts about it. I try to run them pretty close to the tread wear indicators but if I have a trip planned, I will put on new rubber if there is any chance they might wear out on the trip. As yet I have never tried a car tire on a motorcycle but I do know that others do this and are very happy with the result. I suspect if all I rode was flat, straight road I might seriously consider a car tire. But for the back roads I ride I think the MC tire is better. Over the years, many different cycles and many miles I have been most pleased with Dunlops although I have tried Avon, Metzler, and Continental. And I have had my share of nails and screws in tires but again most have gone flat while parked.
harvey
Ride Safe and Ride Often

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rodee71
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Location: Winchester, Virginia
Motorcycle: 1982 1100 Interstate
1993 1500 Aspencade

Re: Tire safety

Postby rodee71 » Tue Oct 14, 2014 7:17 am

Welcome to the best forum out there for anything 'Wing related. Read your questions on tires and remembered my experience. Here's a thread on the forum about some of our experiences with blowouts. FYI. Ride Safe!
viewtopic.php?f=10&t=14248

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tfdeputydawg
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Location: Indianapolis, In.
Motorcycle: 06 Wing III/2010 Hannigan

Re: Tire safety

Postby tfdeputydawg » Tue Oct 14, 2014 9:14 am


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wing rider 2012
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Re: Tire safety

Postby wing rider 2012 » Tue Oct 14, 2014 10:52 am

tfdeputydawg wrote:http://www.ride-on.com/
'nough said :D


I'm wondering if Ride-on is compatible with TPMS rims?
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HawkeyeGL1200
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Location: Courtland, Va.
Motorcycle: 1984 GL1200 Interstate
1981 GL1100 Interstate

Re: Tire safety

Postby HawkeyeGL1200 » Tue Oct 14, 2014 4:41 pm

There was some mention of the TSP system for Goldwings on the web site, but I can't remember if it said it was not a good idea or if it was okay. If you visit the link, I believe you'll find the answer.

wing rider 2012 wrote:
tfdeputydawg wrote:http://www.ride-on.com/
'nough said :D


I'm wondering if Ride-on is compatible with TPMS rims?
I am wrong as often as I am right concerning what is wrong with someone else' motorcycle without having seen the machine in person. Guessing with limited information, as to the source of the trouble, is sketchy at best.

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WingAdmin
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Re: Tire safety

Postby WingAdmin » Thu Oct 16, 2014 8:03 am

wing rider 2012 wrote:
tfdeputydawg wrote:http://www.ride-on.com/
'nough said :D


I'm wondering if Ride-on is compatible with TPMS rims?


No, it is not! The TPMS sensors in the GL1800 are not sealed, and any liquid sealant inside the tires will ruin the sensors.

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tfdeputydawg
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Re: Tire safety

Postby tfdeputydawg » Thu Oct 16, 2014 8:07 am

WingAdmin wrote:
wing rider 2012 wrote:
tfdeputydawg wrote:http://www.ride-on.com/
'nough said :D


I'm wondering if Ride-on is compatible with TPMS rims?


No, it is not! The TPMS sensors in the GL1800 are not sealed, and any liquid sealant inside the tires will ruin the sensors.

Correct. My understanding is the Honda TPMS is not compatible with RideOn at this time but can be used w/ many other TPMS's. I believe RideOn is working on a formula to work w/the Honda TPMS.
Hope to see that soon so all can enjoy the benefits of RideOn as I have for many years in several bikes!
I believe the occurs when the instructions for installing the product are not followed! One is to "shoot" a blast of air into the valve stem, to clear it before reinstalling the valve stem. RideOn then disperses on the inside of the tire along the wall inside of the outer tread area and STAYS there, meaning there should be no reason for the unprotected Honda sensor to be contaminated! Of course that's an opinion and may not be factual!




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