Motorcycle Accidents


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seelyark1
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Location: Dunnellon, Florida
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1998 GL1500 SE Totaled
1984 VT500C
1967 CB550-4

Motorcycle Accidents

Postby seelyark1 » Mon Dec 08, 2014 1:55 pm



While sitting here recouperating from my accident, I got to looking to see if I could figure out how I got a broken ankle. After looking at some videos of bike accidents, it didn't take long! In the course of my research I stumbled onto a site that I found to be very interesting. It is from the UK, and I thought that sharing it with others may help someone else avoid these injurys. http://www.helibikes.co.uk/anatomyofmotorcy.html
I got to looking at my jacket with my Grand daughter, I feel that by the looks of the damage to it and my helmet, It is a miracle that I was not more injured than I was. Sometimes it is good to be knocked out, as all I remember was the last few seconds of sliding to a stop. It looks like I never made it onto my back as all the damage is to the head, shoulders, and front. Wish I had been wearing gloves! Two months and the backs of my hands are still not healed. I have some now :D .
I hope everyone has a safe and joyous Christmas.


Ride safe, and smart. Asphalt is like #1 grit sandpaper. Dave

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WingAdmin
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Location: Strongsville, OH
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1982 GL1100A Aspencade (sold)
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1998 XV250 Virago (sold)
2007 Aspen Sentry Trailer

Re: Motorcycle Accidents

Postby WingAdmin » Tue Dec 16, 2014 1:30 pm

That's really a fantastic site for very scientific descriptions of potential motorcycle injuries, and how to avoid same. At high speed, there's not much you can do to overcome the laws of physics. But at lower speeds, protective gear makes all the difference.

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Aussie81Interstate
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Location: Penrith Australia
Motorcycle: 1982 CX500 Turbo (restoration project)
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Re: Motorcycle Accidents

Postby Aussie81Interstate » Tue Dec 16, 2014 5:13 pm

ATTGAT

All The Gear All The Time - helps. A bit belated but I never get on my bike to go anywhere if I am not properly protected. I don't mind if it takes me an extra minute or two to get my gloves on and jacket and sensible protection for my feet and head. I don't wear kevlar jeans but normal jeans for my daily riding.

Have had one big accident that I don't really remember that much about - apart from a brand new helmet worn through at the chin (2 days old), and my old leather jacket shredded up one arm to the liner.

In Australia you see so many riders with sometimes just a singlet/shorts and maybe a pair of joggers - I call them Temporary Australians.

Stay safe out there. :)

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WingAdmin
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Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1982 GL1100A Aspencade (sold)
1989 PC800 (wife's!)
1998 XV250 Virago (sold)
2007 Aspen Sentry Trailer

Re: Motorcycle Accidents

Postby WingAdmin » Tue Dec 16, 2014 11:24 pm

I see lots of underdressed riders around here, but even those wearing jeans think they're fine and protected. Jeans are really very poor against road abrasion, and wear through in an instant, leaving you with bare skin skidding along the pavement. I have personal experience in this.

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BullCBX
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Motorcycle: 1996 GL1500SE
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Re: Motorcycle Accidents

Postby BullCBX » Wed Dec 17, 2014 11:47 am

My wife and I were well into our first extended bike trip back in September when we experienced a nasty low-side accident. We were out in the blessed middle of no-where WV. Encountered a patch of fine gravel and sand in a blind curve that caused me to adjust my line in the curve and we ended up drifting off the road surface. Once the rear tire came off the asphalt, the bike immediately went down hard. I was thrown off back onto the road surface and landed on my left shoulder and face. I cannot speak for my wife as she only remembers watching me slide away from her. I can say with assurance our gear helped minimize (or eliminate) injuries. Even with my slide, I ended up with a couple of sore ribs, one small bruise , but no cuts or scrapes and thanks to the full face helmet, nothing on the face. The wife did not fare as well. As WingAdmin mentioned above, you cannot fight the laws of physics and my wife found this out the hard way. Once we came to a stop, she was concerned for me and tried to move to get to me and immediately found she was in incredible pain. Her left leg was broken. Her tibia and fibula were broken both close to the knee and close to her ankle (4 breaks total). Luckily none were compound fractures. Like me though, this was her only injury. No cuts, scraps or road rash. It is my belief that when the bike went down, something on the bike caught her leg at these points and caused the breaks. It is my opinion that no amount of gear could have prevented her type injury, but her recovery was not compounded by trying to deal with a major case of road rash. She now has a rod in her lower leg and about 8 screws holding thing together, and was only released recently to put 100% of her weight on it while wearing an air cast. We are almost 12 weeks into the recovery and still have a long road to hoe. Everyone has a choice on what they wear and how they ride. I do not have any issues with folks who wear shorts and flip-flops riding. It's their choice. But I can assure you they will not get an ounce of sympathy from me we they report the amount of injuries they suffer in an accident. I have no idea who said it, but somewhere along my journeys I heard the phrase “you don’t dress for the ride, you dress for the accident”. This happens to be a philosophy I agree with, so I will continue to wear my gear, even on those high 90 degree days here in Atlanta.

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Mh434
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1981 GL1100I
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Re: Motorcycle Accidents

Postby Mh434 » Wed Dec 17, 2014 12:20 pm

I've posted my deer-vs.-me crash here before, but some of it bears repeating - the ONLY reason I'm alive, sitting here writing this, is because I practice ATGATT. At that, I suffered about 30+ broken bones, destroyed left shoulder (left arm is still 2" longer than my right, and shoulder is permanently dislocated), two dislocated thumbs, and a concussion with inner ear (balance) damage. My modular carbon fiber/Kevlar helmet was destroyed in the crash, but in the process absorbed the energy that would have killed me with certainty.

What drives me nuts most is 1) seeing morons riding crotch rockets, racing through traffic, wearing t-shirts, flip-flops, and shorts, and; 2) seeing Harley riders wearing plastic fruit-bowl helmets (bearing tags inside that say "For novelty use only. Not for use as a motorcycle helmet."). As helmets are mandatory here, they seem to think that

As a (retired) professional police collision investigator/analyst/reconstructionist, I can assure you that both of the former activities result in massive, life-threatening injuries in the event of a crash. Of the two, the latter, though, is more likely to be fatal. Thankfully, the crotch-rocket riders tend (at least in these parts) to be wearing high-dollar full-face helmets (with wild graphics), so their injuries are often limited to broken bones, lacerations and abrasions. In the Harley-rider category, though, even slo-mo crashes are often fatal. Even banging your unprotected head on the ground at 20 mph can be lethal. I've attended (and photographed, in detail) many, many motorcycle crash autopsies, and had to visit many, many families to break the news that Johnny/Bobby/Ralph isn't coming home.

All for the want of not practicing ATGATT.

Thankfully, from my own observations, GW owners seem to be the most safety-conscious, common-sense, thoughtful riders out there. Thanks folks - you are the ones who helped to make my job easier...and make me feel comfortable practicing ATGATT!!

On the downside, we have mandatory government insurance here with motorcycle rates based on engine size, not bike type or intended use, so my GL1500 rates are substantially higher than, say, a 150hp crotch rocket. Plus, the costs of the injuries & deaths suffered by the aforementioned non-ATGATT morons are shared out amongst the rest of us.

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redial
Posts: 1993
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Location: Kapunda, SouthAustralia
Motorcycle: 1997 GL1500 Spectre Red Aspencade

Re: Motorcycle Accidents

Postby redial » Wed Dec 17, 2014 9:33 pm

I had a doctor friend that practiced discrimination when she was in the Emergency Room of the hospital, in the tropics. For those that had come off their motorbike without any gear got cleaned up and treated, removing bits of gravel from their hands, legs, arms, and wherever else. This was done carefully and competently.

However, those that took the precautions of ATGATT, were positively discriminated by being given an anesthetic before the picking of the gravel, and treating the road rash from the various parts of the body.

When asked why "No anesthetic." She would reply, "no brains, no feeling!" and continue on with her cleaning and treating. Her spouse rode a GW, and she knew about ATGATT.
Len in Kapunda

The world is not going to finish today, as it is already tomorrow in Australia and New Zealand, and other islands of foreign nations such as Guam and Samoa.

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WingAdmin
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Location: Strongsville, OH
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1982 GL1100A Aspencade (sold)
1989 PC800 (wife's!)
1998 XV250 Virago (sold)
2007 Aspen Sentry Trailer

Re: Motorcycle Accidents

Postby WingAdmin » Thu Dec 18, 2014 9:22 am

redial wrote:I had a doctor friend that practiced discrimination when she was in the Emergency Room of the hospital, in the tropics. For those that had come off their motorbike without any gear got cleaned up and treated, removing bits of gravel from their hands, legs, arms, and wherever else. This was done carefully and competently.

However, those that took the precautions of ATGATT, were positively discriminated by being given an anesthetic before the picking of the gravel, and treating the road rash from the various parts of the body.

When asked why "No anesthetic." She would reply, "no brains, no feeling!" and continue on with her cleaning and treating. Her spouse rode a GW, and she knew about ATGATT.


:lol: you'd get sued out of existence here in the US if you tried that as a doctor, but I love the idea! :)




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