Arthritis and motorcycles


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tom84std
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Arthritis and motorcycles

Postby tom84std » Mon Dec 22, 2014 4:20 pm



I have several friends who all talk to me about their clutch lever becoming more difficult to operate as age and arthritis begin to set in. For a couple of days now, the wife and I have discussed the viability of enlisting trained monkeys to sit on the rider's left arm and operate the clutch. Very much like a seeing eye dog or any other service animal. We're looking into running our very own clutch monkey training program out of our house. Does this sound like a good solution to you guys?



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WingAdmin
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Re: Arthritis and motorcycles

Postby WingAdmin » Mon Dec 22, 2014 5:03 pm

This is a real problem. I know the extremely stiff clutch on my GSX-R750, combined with the angle my wrist was put in by virtue of the seating position, caused extreme pain in my left wrist within 15-20 minutes of riding in traffic. At times the pain was so bad that I would end up just hooking my fingers over the clutch and pulling it in by pulling my whole arm back, instead of squeezing my fingers.

My wife has similar problems, even small bikes with relatively light clutches give her pain after a while. We're looking at options for that.

The problem is, you're working against the laws of physics. When you have a bike that puts out a lot of torque (i.e. our Goldwings), you need strong clutch springs to press the clutch plates together, so that they don't slip when the clutch is engaged. Unfortunately, this also means you need strong hands in order to squeeze your lever and compress those springs to disengage it.

Hydraulic clutches help, as you lose the extra friction from cable clutches. Longer clutch levers also help, giving you extra leverage - but also meaning you have to squeeze the lever in a longer arc in order to clutch and declutch.

For those with arthritis or other maladies, or women with less hand strength, it's a real problem. I know Honda is addressing the female market head-on, offering a large number of new bikes with its semi-automatic clutchless transmission, seen in the NC700 and CTX700 series bikes (all of which use the same 670cc engine and dual clutch semi-automatic transmission).

I fully expect the next generation of Goldwing will offer the same, knowing the core demographic has traditionally been older riders.

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virgilmobile
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Re: Arthritis and motorcycles

Postby virgilmobile » Mon Dec 22, 2014 5:05 pm

Count me in....would you provide the food as well??

How bout inventing a inline adapter....A device that could be attached inline of the hydraulic line for the clutch....It could be vacuum operated....Kinda like a power brake booster but smaller.....It could make the clutch lever a "one finger"pull.

My brakes are a "one toe" braking....in the car,not the bike.....YET.. :lol:

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skier
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Re: Arthritis and motorcycles

Postby skier » Mon Dec 22, 2014 5:08 pm

"the clutch monkeys"...I think I've been to one of their concerts at sometime in the past.

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HawkeyeGL1200
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Re: Arthritis and motorcycles

Postby HawkeyeGL1200 » Mon Dec 22, 2014 5:36 pm

You could add an air shifter like drag bikes use.. I'm sure a pneumatic contraption could be made up with solenoid to work the hydraulic clutch... Don't know about "slipping" the clutch from a stop LOL...
I am wrong as often as I am right concerning what is wrong with someone else' motorcycle without having seen the machine in person. Guessing with limited information, as to the source of the trouble, is sketchy at best.

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dingdong
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Re: Arthritis and motorcycles

Postby dingdong » Tue Dec 23, 2014 8:23 am

Okaaay! Sounds good to me. Why not teach them counter steering and front braking as well. One on each side of the bars. Then we could just sit back and enjoy the scenery. ;) :lol: Hee hee. If my wife reads this she will say she has one now.
Tom

A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.

f1xrupr
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Re: Arthritis and motorcycles

Postby f1xrupr » Fri Dec 26, 2014 3:58 pm

Reastat hand lever over a soldinoid actuator?????
My exercise bike is a goldwing.

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HawkeyeGL1200
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Re: Arthritis and motorcycles

Postby HawkeyeGL1200 » Fri Dec 26, 2014 4:32 pm

I'm sure a robotics person could suss out doing exactly that.. which was kind of where I was going with it, with a little tongue poked in my cheek... I don't have much pain in my hands. I also don't find the hydraulic clutch of my 1200 much of a chore to pull and release. I do have some pain in my left wrist from an old break and at times I find the angle of the bars more objectionable than the pulling and releasing of the clutch lever.

I'm wondering if modifying the grip angle by either replacing the bars or figuring out how to bend them in a controlled fashion might help with the pain associated with squeezing the clutch when the person has arthritis? I have pretty much constant pain in both my knees and my right hip, but neither of those sources of pain keeps me from riding short distances anyway..

I do like how you think.

f1xrupr wrote:Reastat hand lever over a soldinoid actuator?????
I am wrong as often as I am right concerning what is wrong with someone else' motorcycle without having seen the machine in person. Guessing with limited information, as to the source of the trouble, is sketchy at best.

f1xrupr
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Re: Arthritis and motorcycles

Postby f1xrupr » Fri Dec 26, 2014 5:14 pm

Left field comment......do a web search on "the healing properties of garlic" please....l trust you will be as shocked as I was!
My exercise bike is a goldwing.

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WingAdmin
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Re: Arthritis and motorcycles

Postby WingAdmin » Fri Dec 26, 2014 5:36 pm

Changing the angle of the lever or bar so that your wrist is as flat as possible when riding/clutching can make a huge difference. Tougher to do on a Goldwing than a lot of other bikes, but it can be done.

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brentsboats
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Re: Arthritis and motorcycles

Postby brentsboats » Fri Dec 26, 2014 5:40 pm

There is another answer to this problem ,Tie string from handle to your head ,When u wish to shift ,pull ur head back ,, pretty sure this will work ,but i must admit i never tried it . :D
Thanks For Reading
Brent
http://www.sunkboat.com

f1xrupr
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Re: Arthritis and motorcycles

Postby f1xrupr » Fri Dec 26, 2014 6:36 pm

Hey...you know what?....that reastat-soldinoid thingi will work! Here is an example; electronic brakes on a trailer...that little slider on the brake controller mounted to the dash (old style) is a reastat. The further you push it over, the harder the brakes are applied (soldinoid). If it can stop a 15000lb trailer, it can pull a clutch cable, or push a slave cylinder piston! The only reason that it's not practical is because there is no such thing. It would sell. It could be a opportunity for an invention. Why don't I try it?....lve got my hands full...Where are you at Rick?... :idea:


My exercise bike is a goldwing.


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