deer alerts


Anything goes - doesn't fit any other category!
  • Sponsored Links
User avatar
brentsboats
Posts: 164
Joined: Sun Dec 21, 2014 8:09 am
Location: HADLEY,MASS 01035
Motorcycle: may 2015
Sold 82 gl1100 Sold 2002 vulcan nomad ,now have 86 gl1200 and 94 gl1500 work in progress
Contact:

Re: deer alerts

Post by brentsboats » Fri Jan 09, 2015 6:25 am



Along time ago i was driving back from a fishing trip near the Canada border. It was about 3 am in the morning and i would guess i was about half way home to Mass. As i was riding south on interstate 91 at a pretty good clip i passed a deer sleeping in the left lane . I shudder now to think just how lucky i was .A matter of driving the right lane vs the left lane . I was in the right lane at the right time . I have never driven at night on rt 91 since and never will .
Brent


Thanks For Reading
Brent
http://www.sunkboat.com

User avatar
CMReynolds1
Posts: 647
Joined: Wed Sep 24, 2014 5:56 pm
Location: Oregon
Motorcycle: 2013 F6B

Re: deer alerts

Post by CMReynolds1 » Fri Jan 09, 2015 9:39 am

A footnote..... Anyone who has ridden in Wyoming (and I am sure other places) have had to 'fun' of dealing with the Antelope herds that go back and forth. To me, they make the deer seem safe. They will start across, turn around, come back, change their mind and go back. Meanwhile you are locking up and looking for a landing zone! Fun little animal!
As mentioned earlier by another member, I am glad all who are writing here are in one piece and safe after your encounters! Take care all. :)
Ride Safe,
Taz


TF 116, RivRon 512, Can Tho, S. Vietnam, 8/66-/9/68, GM(G)2

User avatar
seelyark1
Posts: 538
Joined: Sun May 27, 2012 1:57 pm
Location: Dunnellon, Florida
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1998 GL1500 SE Totaled
1984 VT500C
1967 CB550-4

Re: deer alerts

Post by seelyark1 » Fri Jan 09, 2015 10:19 am

Deer can do the same thing. We kinda have to remember that we are riding in their "home", and they don't have to take a drivers test. We have to be alert for them. One day when riding in my van, I came across a group of high school students stopped by the side of the road and there was a deer laying there. I stopped and turned around and went back just as they all drove away. Was a nice fresh doe, so I gutted her and loaded her into the van, took her home. That night we had fresh backstrap for dinner. :D This was on the same road that I had my last wreck, so I know to look for them. They are just one of the perils we have to remain alert for as we ride.
Ride safe, and smart. Asphalt is like #1 grit sandpaper. Dave

User avatar
brettchallenger
Posts: 654
Joined: Sat May 29, 2010 11:03 am
Location: Driffield, the East Riding of Yorkshire, England
Motorcycle: 1978 Triumph Tiger TR7 (sold)
2000 Honda GL1500 SE
1985 MZ ETZ250 (a cold war special).

Re: deer alerts

Post by brettchallenger » Fri Jan 09, 2015 2:25 pm

"The kangaroo is on Australia's coat of arms, (unlike your angry bird with a fist full of arrows), so we are one of the few countries that eat our coat of arms. (It is getting a bit hard to find English lions; and I have not found anyone that likes cooked up Scottish thistles; if it wasnt for the Welsh eating their leeks, all of the UK would go hungry :D )"

The national emblem of England is a rose, which is neither edible nor the cause of many accidents.

Now unicorns, there is one pesky creature to avoid on a motorcycle.
Never trust a nation whose armed forces goose-step

User avatar
Solina Dave
Posts: 536
Joined: Fri Dec 26, 2014 6:38 pm
Location: Solina, Ontario, Canada
Motorcycle: 1978 Honda Goldwing GL1000 (bought in fall of '77)
!977 Honda CB550F (my 1st motorcycle)

Re: deer alerts

Post by Solina Dave » Thu Jan 22, 2015 5:59 pm

Deer in Ontario are quite common. I don't believe deer alerts work either. Your best bet, is to try and be as vigilant as possible, always.
Years ago, one very early frosty morning after having spent the night camped in a beautiful backwoods campground maintained by the state, and just off a winding mountain road in Oregon, I was enjoying the very quiet, but very chilly, still mountain air. I had my morning cup of tea, broke camp, and was riding down the road at a very leisurely pace. The solitude was almost surreal. I might not have been paying as much attention as I should have been. Suddenly, a brown bear of about 400 lbs. charged down the embankment to my left, crossed the road right in front of me, so close that most of the bear was not even visible on the other side of the fairing. My front tire must have brushed his fur. I only had time for brakes, and the back end started to slide around just as the full view of the bear once again became visible to my right, and then I let off on the brakes, and the motorcycle wobbled back upright and away I went. Whew! The last thing I saw was the backside of one very startled bear crossing the narrow shoulder, and disappearing as he dove over the embankment, and down into the forest below. I rode down that road with my heart thumping for 20 minutes before I encountered another vehicle. It was a very isolated region. As I rode, I had visions in my mind of my motorcycle lying on its side, with me on one side, and the bear on the other, both of us doing that comical side-to-side two-step, him trying to get at me, and me trying to not let him. As it turned out, I think that he was probably just as scared as I was, and he opted to avoid any further interaction with me, and that big ugly beast I was riding. We were bigger than him. That was a good thing.
Avoid riding near dawn. That's when animals are moving from their sleeping areas to their feeding areas, and avoid riding at dusk, because that's when they move from their feeding areas to their sleeping areas. This transition often that involves crossing the road. Also, keep your eyes open, and never simply assume anything. I agree with the rider who commented earlier, and also based on personal experience driving trucks on the Trans-Canada Highway, that animals, especially deer, travel together. Don't get visually fixed on the deer that's just crossed your path, even though it is human nature to admire one of these beautiful creatures, because while you're looking at it, the one you don't see is right behind it.

Happy riding everyone, and come on spring!...........................Dave
"Assume Nothing"

bob-c
Posts: 16
Joined: Tue Aug 26, 2014 12:49 pm
Location: Victoria,BC
Motorcycle: 2007 GL 1800

Re: deer alerts

Post by bob-c » Sat Jan 24, 2015 5:35 pm

We have a lot of deer here on Vancouver Island. We have unfortunately had one run-in with a deer and the insurance bill when cleaned up was $20k, a hip replacement and several knee surgeries. I immediately bought an electronic Deer Whistle from Wingstuff and have been running it now for 5 yrs. Almost every member of our group has one installed now.
What we find, is that when you see a deer in the ditch or a near-by field, it snaps it's head up and looks in the direction of the whistle. It then either stays still or slowly wanders off, away from the highway.
Without the whistle, you come upon deer in the ditch and they are startled. At this point, they burst into a frightened run.....to the clearest space for them to run....the highway.
Our group has seen this repeated time and time again. It's no freak.
Bob C 135k, '07 1800

User avatar
HawkeyeGL1200
Posts: 918
Joined: Sat Jul 05, 2014 11:53 am
Location: Courtland, Va.
Motorcycle: 1984 GL1200 Interstate
1981 GL1100 Interstate

Re: deer alerts

Post by HawkeyeGL1200 » Sat Jan 24, 2015 7:20 pm

While riding down the roads I frequently travel here in Virginia, I often see deer behave exactly as you describe (after dark) from what I can only assume is the sound of my engine, tires or other noise related the the riding of the bike. The deer that are peacefully feeding along the side of the road, or in a field within sight of the road, that raise their head and turn to face the bike as I'm riding by, aren't the ones I'm all that worried about.

As (bad) luck would have it, I've probably hit 20-25 deer with cars and trucks, and one on the motorcycle. Not a single one of the deer I've hit started as one of those "peacefully feeding" deer along the highway. In every case, the deer I hit has run into the road from tall brush or thick forest, and remained unseen until it was too late for me to react in time to avoid collision.

I have had at least three (I'm trying to recall every case) run into the side of my vehicle(s)... have hit untold numbers full on broad-side, and have had at least two jump off an elevated section of "shoulder" and land right in front of the headlights, and one landed pretty much on the front bumper. If the operator of a motor vehicle had time to react, these things wouldn't be a concern. When I see deer feeding close to the road, I slow down and if possible move to the center of the road to give me more time to avoid collision, should they suddenly become panicked and do something stupid. The deer I hit on the bike was on one side of the highway, unseen to me, and it apparently wanted to be on the other side of the road with the group I did see that was feeding on something growing near the ditch. I saw a group, and moved over (which ended up decreasing my reaction time to the one I eventually hit) and then the one ran right into me. It happened so quickly, I didn't have time to do anything... and then it was survival mode.. don't know who I didn't wreck the bike, except that I probably throttle up when I was trying to stay in the seat... which probably straightened me back out again.. who knows. The whole incident was over in two seconds...

My concern is based in what believe to be the few deer that are traveling (on the run) for a variety of reasons... frightened perhaps.. spooked by who knows what, and have not the slightest concern for anything on either side of them. The bolt and run toward safety at breakneck speed, and they don't look at much of anything as they run. These are the deer that concern me. Their behavior is predictable once you see them, but when they run from cover and that cover is within 20 feet (the trees here often are allowed to grow right up to the ditch) of the lane you're driving in, and they run 20 miles per hour or so, you have about 1 second from the time you see them until impact if they're close enough.

I'm going to keep looking to see if there is some sure-fire way to get the deer to run away from some "thing." I don't have any faith in any of the commercially available products. I did look into the device sold on the Wingstuff site, and have not made a decision as to whether I believe it works or not. My way of thinking is, if it isn't unbearably uncomfortable to the person riding the MC or driving the car it is attached to and it is in the audible range of human hearing, it won't do what I want it to do LOL... I want a device that a deer can't stand to be within 50 yards of because it causes such an uncomfortable sound TO THEM that they will avoid it regardless of their state of mind when they hear that sound coming their way... like me and a freight train.
bob-c wrote:We have a lot of deer here on Vancouver Island. We have unfortunately had one run-in with a deer and the insurance bill when cleaned up was $20k, a hip replacement and several knee surgeries. I immediately bought an electronic Deer Whistle from Wingstuff and have been running it now for 5 yrs. Almost every member of our group has one installed now.
What we find, is that when you see a deer in the ditch or a near-by field, it snaps it's head up and looks in the direction of the whistle. It then either stays still or slowly wanders off, away from the highway.
Without the whistle, you come upon deer in the ditch and they are startled. At this point, they burst into a frightened run.....to the clearest space for them to run....the highway.
Our group has seen this repeated time and time again. It's no freak.
Bob C 135k, '07 1800
I am wrong as often as I am right concerning what is wrong with someone else' motorcycle without having seen the machine in person. Guessing with limited information, as to the source of the trouble, is sketchy at best.

User avatar
PoolDude
Posts: 75
Joined: Tue Aug 20, 2013 5:05 pm
Location: Phoenix, Arizona
Motorcycle: 1975 GL1000

Re: deer alerts

Post by PoolDude » Sat Jan 24, 2015 8:13 pm

In my experience the best way to make sure you never see a deer is to look like a hunter. Put on an orange vest and those suckers will run like the wind. :lol: Putting jest aside, I don't think there is a sure way of making the deer avoid you so the best tactic is to pay attention and avoid them. I know this isn't always possible but paying attention works more times than not.

User avatar
HawkeyeGL1200
Posts: 918
Joined: Sat Jul 05, 2014 11:53 am
Location: Courtland, Va.
Motorcycle: 1984 GL1200 Interstate
1981 GL1100 Interstate

Re: deer alerts

Post by HawkeyeGL1200 » Sat Jan 24, 2015 8:37 pm

I agree. The trouble I have is, if I don't ride when deer are active, I would never ride to work and back... which I do with regularity. There's got to be a solution. I just haven't figured out what it is yet.
PoolDude wrote:In my experience the best way to make sure you never see a deer is to look like a hunter. Put on an orange vest and those suckers will run like the wind. :lol: Putting jest aside, I don't think there is a sure way of making the deer avoid you so the best tactic is to pay attention and avoid them. I know this isn't always possible but paying attention works more times than not.
I am wrong as often as I am right concerning what is wrong with someone else' motorcycle without having seen the machine in person. Guessing with limited information, as to the source of the trouble, is sketchy at best.

User avatar
Solina Dave
Posts: 536
Joined: Fri Dec 26, 2014 6:38 pm
Location: Solina, Ontario, Canada
Motorcycle: 1978 Honda Goldwing GL1000 (bought in fall of '77)
!977 Honda CB550F (my 1st motorcycle)

Re: deer alerts

Post by Solina Dave » Sat Jan 24, 2015 11:11 pm

I'll have to agree. I don't believe that there's a device on the market that will guarantee to make deer, and other animals, especially a moose, run the other way. If one is ever produced, I'll pay almost whatever they want for it, and use it for back-up to keeping my eyes open.
I'm a firm believer that extra vigilance, especially at and around dawn and dusk, is your best bet. I fully understand that there are some who are bound to ride, to and from work, in the morning and evening, but with that comes the necessity for even greater vigilance. Also, unless it was absolutely necessary, I wouldn't ride after dark at all.
Also, you may want to comment on this, but I try at all cost to ride behind a car, as opposed to being in front of a car. Not too far behind, and certainly not too close, but enough that the crazy deer will hopefully run out in front of him first. There's still no guarantee, but this is the life we've chosen. We like to live on the edge. We're only on two wheels. If we don't put our feet down when we stop, we'll fall over. Duh! Somebody who only drives a car just doesn't get it, and until they do ride a motorcycle, they never will. If there's a line of cars behind me, I'll wait for a good spot to pull over, and let them all pass me. Then I'll take up the rear spot. I try to do this as much as I can. This tactic isn't entirely to avoid collisions with animals, but frankly I'd rather have those cagers ahead of me, so I can keep an eye on them, and possibly have a bit of extra time to analyze whatever dumb stunt they're going to pull, and take whatever action I must, to avoid a costly fiasco. It's really no big deal for me anyway, because honestly, I'm not in that much of a hurry.

Cheers...................Dave
"Assume Nothing"

User avatar
HawkeyeGL1200
Posts: 918
Joined: Sat Jul 05, 2014 11:53 am
Location: Courtland, Va.
Motorcycle: 1984 GL1200 Interstate
1981 GL1100 Interstate

Re: deer alerts

Post by HawkeyeGL1200 » Sat Jan 24, 2015 11:31 pm

+1 for having a car running interference in front where possible. I like to give them a three-second lead and in that way, I'm not only not following too closely, but it lets me see further ahead in their headlights than I can see on my own. As you accurately pointed out, it isn't fool-proof by any stretch of the imagination, but I believe it is a good strategy. Without getting into a dissertation on how much I hate having a car following me, particularly one who is following too closely, I don't like it very much. Sometimes it can't be helped, and generally once I've set the speed at which I plan to ride, tailgaters can either stay behind me and be jerks or pass... their choice.

My next data gathering mission is to try to speak with as many Law Enforcement Officers as will talk to me to see if they have any "contact" with deer while running siren(s). The study I read recently, pretty much rules out a constant tone as effective... at least the frequency that was used in the study... so I'm wondering is a warbling tone like a siren elicits a "positive" response from deer. I've also considered a discordant tone... Auto horns tend to use something similar, or at least old fashioned ones did...

I don't see a blaring (audible to humans anyway) noise as something that would interest anyone. Anyway, I don't think about this all the time, but I do spend a lot of my riding time thinking about it. I also beg a lot of deer hunters to strive to kill as many deer as it is legal for them to do. That strategy hasn't born much fruit.
Solina Dave wrote:I'll have to agree. I don't believe that there's a device on the market that will guarantee to make deer, and other animals, especially a moose, run the other way. If one is ever produced, I'll pay almost whatever they want for it, and use it for back-up to keeping my eyes open.
I'm a firm believer that extra vigilance, especially at and around dawn and dusk, is your best bet. I fully understand that there are some who are bound to ride, to and from work, in the morning and evening, but with that comes the necessity for even greater vigilance. Also, unless it was absolutely necessary, I wouldn't ride after dark at all.
Also, you may want to comment on this, but I try at all cost to ride behind a car, as opposed to being in front of a car. Not too far behind, and certainly not too close, but enough that the crazy deer will hopefully run out in front of him first. There's still no guarantee, but this is the life we've chosen. We like to live on the edge. We're only on two wheels. If we don't put our feet down when we stop, we'll fall over. Duh! Somebody who only drives a car just doesn't get it, and until they do ride a motorcycle, they never will. If there's a line of cars behind me, I'll wait for a good spot to pull over, and let them all pass me. Then I'll take up the rear spot. I try to do this as much as I can. This tactic isn't entirely to avoid collisions with animals, but frankly I'd rather have those cagers ahead of me, so I can keep an eye on them, and possibly have a bit of extra time to analyze whatever dumb stunt they're going to pull, and take whatever action I must, to avoid a costly fiasco. It's really no big deal for me anyway, because honestly, I'm not in that much of a hurry.

Cheers...................Dave
I am wrong as often as I am right concerning what is wrong with someone else' motorcycle without having seen the machine in person. Guessing with limited information, as to the source of the trouble, is sketchy at best.

User avatar
seelyark1
Posts: 538
Joined: Sun May 27, 2012 1:57 pm
Location: Dunnellon, Florida
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1998 GL1500 SE Totaled
1984 VT500C
1967 CB550-4

Re: deer alerts

Post by seelyark1 » Sun Jan 25, 2015 1:25 pm

I hate to even think about how many times I have seen a deer cross the road between me and the car I am following. :o Vigilance is the only thing that works for sure, and even then it is hit and miss. No pun intended. They will do what they want, and we just have to live with their decisions. If you know that it is a deer crossing, slow down so you have more time to react. If you ride that road often, you should know where they are and ride accordingly ;)
Ride safe, and smart. Asphalt is like #1 grit sandpaper. Dave

User avatar
Solina Dave
Posts: 536
Joined: Fri Dec 26, 2014 6:38 pm
Location: Solina, Ontario, Canada
Motorcycle: 1978 Honda Goldwing GL1000 (bought in fall of '77)
!977 Honda CB550F (my 1st motorcycle)

Re: deer alerts

Post by Solina Dave » Sun Jan 25, 2015 3:12 pm

So are you saying that your odds for survival are not improved by following, as opposed to leading?
"Assume Nothing"

User avatar
Breakdancer
Posts: 159
Joined: Tue May 15, 2012 7:19 pm
Location: Bevent, Wisconsin
Motorcycle: 1993 gl1500 Aspencade

Re: deer alerts

Post by Breakdancer » Sun Jan 25, 2015 4:31 pm

As for me, I also will likely follow. Hawkeye hit on a great point. You can use the lights from the car ahead of you to get a little "heads up". No guarantees in anything. Vigilance is a must. Just a note here, I was driving my truck home from a friends house last week. 1900 hrs. Just under 6 miles from my house. My son and I counted over 125 deer. And yes , we do our best to thin the herd during bow and rifle seasons. Google "train cattle guard". There has to be a way to mount one of these things.. :lol:
Blue Skies...Scott ;
PGR

User avatar
HawkeyeGL1200
Posts: 918
Joined: Sat Jul 05, 2014 11:53 am
Location: Courtland, Va.
Motorcycle: 1984 GL1200 Interstate
1981 GL1100 Interstate

Re: deer alerts

Post by HawkeyeGL1200 » Sun Jan 25, 2015 6:29 pm

I don't know how many deer you are allowed to kill in a season where you live. In the counties I ride through to and from work, a person can continue to buy tags as long as they want to most years. A "basic" big game license comes with a couple, and then for like 12$ more, you can get two more... so, the opportunities abound..

For now, I'm searching for information about what kinds of noises will help. I've got an electronics savvy friend willing to lend a hand to build anything I want to try. Until then, I'm going to add more lights to help me see the deer better... and hopefully give me a little bit more of an edge in avoiding them when they feel like trying to kill me.
Breakdancer wrote:As for me, I also will likely follow. Hawkeye hit on a great point. You can use the lights from the car ahead of you to get a little "heads up". No guarantees in anything. Vigilance is a must. Just a note here, I was driving my truck home from a friends house last week. 1900 hrs. Just under 6 miles from my house. My son and I counted over 125 deer. And yes , we do our best to thin the herd during bow and rifle seasons. Google "train cattle guard". There has to be a way to mount one of these things.. :lol:
I am wrong as often as I am right concerning what is wrong with someone else' motorcycle without having seen the machine in person. Guessing with limited information, as to the source of the trouble, is sketchy at best.

User avatar
waituntilthebeep
Posts: 282
Joined: Mon Jul 22, 2013 12:38 pm
Location: Rainy Pacific Northwest
Motorcycle: 2012 GL1800
Black and Silver
Previously:
1989 GL1500
Wineberry Red
'01 Shadow 750
DOUBLE DARK SIDE #1467 on Michelin Primacy and BT45

Re: deer alerts

Post by waituntilthebeep » Tue Jan 27, 2015 12:49 am

CMReynolds1 wrote:The made the deer look up at him, just before he slammed into it.
I have the same problem but with people. It usually occurs when I am playing 80's rap music. They look up, see a Wing (which is supposed to be an old guys bike I guess?) and mumble to themselves, "What the $%^@# was that?" No whistle will solve that problem.

sfruechte
Posts: 208
Joined: Tue Mar 09, 2010 12:53 pm
Location: La Crosse, WI
Motorcycle: 1977 GL1000

Re: deer alerts

Post by sfruechte » Mon Feb 02, 2015 10:58 am

Slowing down definitely helps. You have a better chance of seeing the deer and a better chance of successfully reacting.
If you do the math, you do not really make time on the highway anyway if you factor in using more gas, tires, wear and tear and the time filling up, maintaining, repurchasing and the time it takes you to earn the money to do the more frequent filling up, maintaining and repurchasing. Slowing down also helps in 4 wheel vehicles.

ScottyKs
Posts: 10
Joined: Sun Nov 08, 2009 12:25 pm
Location: Hill City, Ks
Motorcycle: 2004 GL1800

Re: deer alerts

Post by ScottyKs » Mon Feb 02, 2015 12:05 pm

I will throw this info in the mix.
I am a retired Sheriff from Western Kansas where over my 35 year career I have worked hundreds of deer-vehicle accidents. I only remember working a couple of them that had deer whistles on them. Whether they work or not I can not say, but for a few dollars we always placed them on the patrol cars, and many a time I have observed deer stop any action and look toward the passing by patrol unit.
They are certainly no guarantee, but perhaps superstition plays a role for some people. Since they use the whistles, they are more aware of deer near roadways, thereby making them a little safer driver by being more observant.

User avatar
Solina Dave
Posts: 536
Joined: Fri Dec 26, 2014 6:38 pm
Location: Solina, Ontario, Canada
Motorcycle: 1978 Honda Goldwing GL1000 (bought in fall of '77)
!977 Honda CB550F (my 1st motorcycle)

Re: deer alerts

Post by Solina Dave » Mon Feb 02, 2015 12:14 pm

sfruechte wrote:Slowing down definitely helps. You have a better chance of seeing the deer and a better chance of successfully reacting.
If you do the math, you do not really make time on the highway anyway if you factor in using more gas, tires, wear and tear and the time filling up, maintaining, repurchasing and the time it takes you to earn the money to do the more frequent filling up, maintaining and repurchasing. Slowing down also helps in 4 wheel vehicles.

And, in addition to all those more than relevant factors, on a 600 mile day-ride on a nice bright sunny day at 60 mph., you'd be gone for 10 hours. However, at 80 mph. you'd be back home 2 1/2 hours sooner. Would you really want that? That might be a whole new question. What's everybody's feelings in that regard? Personally, I try my best to minimize my need to hurry, but that's just me.

Ten inches of snow fell last night......................Dave
"Assume Nothing"

User avatar
Solina Dave
Posts: 536
Joined: Fri Dec 26, 2014 6:38 pm
Location: Solina, Ontario, Canada
Motorcycle: 1978 Honda Goldwing GL1000 (bought in fall of '77)
!977 Honda CB550F (my 1st motorcycle)

Re: deer alerts

Post by Solina Dave » Mon Feb 02, 2015 12:39 pm

ScottyKs wrote:I will throw this info in the mix.
I am a retired Sheriff from Western Kansas where over my 35 year career I have worked hundreds of deer-vehicle accidents. I only remember working a couple of them that had deer whistles on them. Whether they work or not I can not say, but for a few dollars we always placed them on the patrol cars, and many a time I have observed deer stop any action and look toward the passing by patrol unit.
They are certainly no guarantee, but perhaps superstition plays a role for some people. Since they use the whistles, they are more aware of deer near roadways, thereby making them a little safer driver by being more observant.

That's an excellent point Scotty, regarding people who use the whistle, whether it's effective or not, being naturally more vigilant simply based on the assumption that deer may be present near the road. Makes sense to me!

Dave
"Assume Nothing"

User avatar
brentsboats
Posts: 164
Joined: Sun Dec 21, 2014 8:09 am
Location: HADLEY,MASS 01035
Motorcycle: may 2015
Sold 82 gl1100 Sold 2002 vulcan nomad ,now have 86 gl1200 and 94 gl1500 work in progress
Contact:

Re: deer alerts

Post by brentsboats » Mon Feb 02, 2015 1:18 pm

SHOOT AND EAT THEM ,,BEST BET ..
Thanks For Reading
Brent
http://www.sunkboat.com

skypilot52
Posts: 4
Joined: Fri Nov 04, 2011 10:32 am
Location: Rhinelander, Wisconsin
Motorcycle: 2001 GL1800

Re: deer alerts

Post by skypilot52 » Mon Feb 02, 2015 2:12 pm

I have hit northern deer while driving cars (12 in 30 years). I have hit one driving a fire engine to a call at 60 MPH running lights, two sirens, one on wail and the other on yelp. This year as luck would have it I hit my first one on my Goldwing. With my wife as a passenger, we were riding at 45 miles per hour and it came up a 15 foot embankment from a lake to the road and in one jump was in front of us. I have responded to car/deer accidents with vehicles using deer whistles as well as those without. Let's face it, we drive road built in the middle of their living rooms. There will be deer on the roads in deer habitat.
Suggestion, plan ahead so hitting one you will have a better chance at survival. First of all, do not "lock up" your brakes. You need the gyroscopic effect of the turning wheels to keep balance. I would also suggest not swerving to a great amount. I have seen those who swerve to miss deer lose control and hit the trees up here in Northern Wisconsin. Wear protective equipment and plan ahead for the event.
When we hit the deer, it was knocked off its feet, spun around as we went by, rolled over and then limped off (according to those who rode behind us). We rode the Wing home and then to California and back. Good luck and ride alert.
Unfortunately up here we only get one permit for deer season. They are tasty.

User avatar
WingAdmin
Site Admin
Posts: 18299
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 4:16 pm
Location: Strongsville, OH
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1982 GL1100A Aspencade (sold)
1989 PC800 (wife's!)
1998 XV250 Virago (sold)
2007 Aspen Sentry Trailer

Re: deer alerts

Post by WingAdmin » Mon Feb 02, 2015 3:56 pm

Keep in mind that in winter season, with all the salt being laid down on the roads, the deer will come to the road and use it as a giant salt lick. Just another thing that brings them in our way!

japbikejerry
Posts: 10
Joined: Sun Jun 06, 2010 9:19 pm
Location: black creek, wisconsin
Motorcycle: 74 cb550
81 xv 750/920 virago
76 gl1000 goldwing

Re: deer alerts

Post by japbikejerry » Mon Feb 02, 2015 4:06 pm

re: deer "attacks"
I live in the fox valley/ Shawano area of Wisconsin( lots of deer lol) and I can say from experience that hitting deer on a bike is not fun as I have hit 2 ( in 9 months apart). I do feel good that is all I have hit so far in 30 plus years of riding.
as far as deer alerts/ deer whistles, 90% of the time they don't work because they get full of bugs and road grime which plugs the air flow passages which makes them useless. I know a lot of people put a small cow bell on the front of their cars/trucks , just like people put "demon" bells on their bikes. do they work ? maybe. I try to be on the look out for the deer, watching the ditches and fields, if I see any I slow down and beep my horn. it may get them running but at least you know what direction they are gone to run.
the thing to keep in mind is to be ever aware of your surroundings ( other vehicles, people, pets, wildlife, road hazards). hell I have seen wildlife in towns.
remember when we are on our bikes we ARE NOT surrounded by 4000 lbs of steel, plastic, glass and air bags

this is my personal quote
"it is better to be riding on top of the coffin than inside it"

User avatar
SlowTyper
Posts: 79
Joined: Fri Jun 25, 2010 7:37 am
Location: Pierre, SD
Motorcycle: 1985 GL1200 Aspencade

Re: deer alerts

Post by SlowTyper » Mon Feb 02, 2015 4:18 pm

Based on my experience, I believe DEER WHISTLES ARE HELPFUL. They tend to stop deer in their tracks, letting you predict the path of least resistance.

I am quite aware a lot of people believe deer whistles are a waste of money, and site deer collisions with vehicles having deer whistles. However, that scenario doesn't mean they are totally worthless.

My observation is that there are a number of things can degrade the performance of deer whistles. Basically, in a lot of circumstance they are TURNED OFF! They require airflow to work, and if they are not mounted where air flows freely, they are effectively OFF. In a similar vein, if they are plugged with bugs, they are effectively OFF. And lastly, high frequency sound is highly directional, so if there is not line of sight between the deer and the whistle, it is effectively OFF.

My observation is that the deer that are the hardest to avoid (and I have had a couple extremely close calls driving vehicles that lack deer whistles) are the deer that are darting across the road. Thus, having something that freezes the deer is advantageous. And I have noticed time and time again that if deer are moving when I approach, when they hear the whistle, they will stop and look up. I have actually had a deer stop in the roadway while I drove by.

Interestingly, I recently put an HID headlight (6000K) on my bike, along with some extremely bright LED lights that I have aimed at the ditches. Last fall, while riding at dusk with my high beam on, I met deer on multiple occasions. In every case but one, they stayed on their side of the road ditch and watched me go by with their heads raised. In the one exception, the deer was running across the field and had cleared the ditch when he apparently heard my deer whistles (I have 4), looked up, saw my lights in his eyes, and did a very abrupt 180 and headed back across the ditch and into the field. However, this one ride is the only time after installing the HID, that I have been riding when deer were out and about, so I can't say for sure my experience that evening was typical. However, I can say the HID light is great for nighttime riding.

I personally would not recommend accelerating when approaching deer, except perhaps at the very last second. Yes, accelerating does provide more control, which may make it advantageous at the last split second. However, higher speeds equate to more energy that has to be dissipated during a collision. Thus, when I see a threat, I slow as abruptly as possible, to decrease the available energy during any potential collision.

I will also say that when your front tire comes in contact with a less movable object, the bike flips - rear wheel up and over the front of the bike. Thus, no matter how tightly you hold on (and I have bent the handlebar holding on), you end up being ejected up and over the front of the bike. And at that point, the slower your body is traveling, the better (I had slowed enough from 45MPH to land on my feet).

And lastly, panic braking is a good thing to practice periodically. Way too many bikers lack the skill to stop in the shortest possible distance, and in an emergency they either skid and loose control, or fail to slow down nearly as much they could have.

Tim



Post Reply