Rider magazine editorial


Anything goes - doesn't fit any other category!
  • Sponsored Links
User avatar
WingAdmin
Site Admin
Posts: 17046
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 4:16 pm
Location: Strongsville, OH
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1982 GL1100A Aspencade (sold)
1989 PC800 (wife's!)
1998 XV250 Virago (sold)
2007 Aspen Sentry Trailer

Rider magazine editorial

Postby WingAdmin » Mon Jan 05, 2015 3:46 pm



I saw this at the end of the editorial of this month's Rider magazine, by Mark Tuttle. He's pretty much captured what I think is the opinion stated here by many:

Even with more than 60 new models for 2015, at least one is conspicuous by its absence. Many expected Honda to unveil an all-new, or at least heavily revised, Gold Wing for its 40th anni- versary in 2015, yet the company's flagship bike returns with just a few special features and paint on a 40th Anniversary model, and 40th anniversary badging on the rest of the line. Granted, Honda has been busy dishing out a slew of other enticing new models the last three years (coincidentally, its 300 millionth motorcycle, a 2015 Gold Wing, was recently produced in Japan), and has consistently argued that its GL customers are fiercely loyal and don't want the kind of frequent changes that create early obsolescence. The current model definitely holds its own in a luxury touring capacity, too, but even the faithful are starting to bemoan the lack of features such as an electric windscreen, Bluetooth, more sophisticated suspension and so on. Personally, I'd also like to see the big bike shed some weight without losing any luggage or fuel capacity. Some things that have been added since the latest model was introduced for 2001 have been less than seamlessly integrated, too, like buttons for certain functions clumsily fastened into a fairing pocket lid.

Honda is not offering the faintest hint about the Gold Wing's future, but turning up the resolution on my crystal ball to high, there is still hope for a new one soon. Two reasons: The current GL1800 has had a two-year longer lifespan-15 years-than its GL1500 predecessor, which ran from 1988 to 2000. And when Honda surprised us with the all-new six-cylinder GL1800 Wing for 2001, it was preceded by a special anniversary four-cylinder model, the 2000 Gold Wing GL1500 SE, one of which serves as the Rider photo wagon to this day. Could the 2015 40th Anniversary model be the harbinger of a new Wing as well? Perhaps. We'd really like to see it happen for the betterment of the luxury-touring category and the sake of competition within it. Oh, and it would also mean that we could probably get a good deal on a 2001-2015 GL1800 - our 2000 GL1500 has a lot of hard miles on it....




User avatar
GreenDragon
Posts: 251
Joined: Thu Apr 08, 2010 12:51 pm
Location: Dillsboro, IN
Motorcycle: 2003 GL1800 GoldWing

Re: Rider magazine editorial

Postby GreenDragon » Mon Jan 05, 2015 4:18 pm

It won't matter to me once I sell my Wing. Having to go to 3 wheels will change all that, unless I Trike it.
Light travels faster than sound, that is why some people appear bright until you hear them speak!

User avatar
MikeB
Posts: 1223
Joined: Fri Dec 04, 2009 12:54 pm
Location: Tacoma, WA
Motorcycle: 1998 - GL1500 Aspencade.
2003 - GL1800A

Re: Rider magazine editorial

Postby MikeB » Tue Jan 06, 2015 10:21 pm

WingAdmin wrote:... The current GL1800 has had a two-year longer lifespan-15 years-than its GL1500 predecessor, which ran from 1988 to 2000. And when Honda surprised us with the all-new six-cylinder GL1800 Wing for 2001, it was preceded by a special anniversary four-cylinder model, the 2000 Gold Wing GL1500 SE, one of which serves as the Rider photo wagon to this day


Did I miss something? "Special Anniversary Four-Cylinder ModelGL1500 SE"?

They must not know much about their Rider photo wagon. Or, I really missed something.
MikeB
Tacoma, WA, USA

User avatar
minimac
Posts: 330
Joined: Mon Aug 06, 2012 9:25 am
Location: Oswego, NY
Motorcycle: 1993 GL1500 Aspencade
2006 Burgman Executive
2007 Yamaha Majesty
2006 Yamaha Morphous-(2018 cannonball scoot)

Re: Rider magazine editorial

Postby minimac » Wed Jan 07, 2015 9:58 am

WingAdmin wrote: ... but even the faithful are starting to bemoan the lack of features such as an electric windscreen, Bluetooth, more sophisticated suspension and so on.


None of the 'Wingers I've ever ridden with have EVER complained about this stuff. It's a bloody motorcycle, afterall. The only real complaints have been the weight, and the price.

User avatar
brettchallenger
Posts: 457
Joined: Sat May 29, 2010 11:03 am
Location: Driffield, the East Riding of Yorkshire, England
Motorcycle: 1978 Triumph Tiger TR7 (sold)
2000 Honda GL1500 SE
1985 MZ ETZ250 (a cold war special).

Re: Rider magazine editorial

Postby brettchallenger » Thu Jan 08, 2015 8:02 am

MikeB wrote:
WingAdmin wrote:... The current GL1800 has had a two-year longer lifespan-15 years-than its GL1500 predecessor, which ran from 1988 to 2000. And when Honda surprised us with the all-new six-cylinder GL1800 Wing for 2001, it was preceded by a special anniversary four-cylinder model, the 2000 Gold Wing GL1500 SE, one of which serves as the Rider photo wagon to this day


Did I miss something? "Special Anniversary Four-Cylinder ModelGL1500 SE"?

They must not know much about their Rider photo wagon. Or, I really missed something.


Yes, this seems to have passed me by too. However, it is not a bad idea. Does a GW actually need six cylinders? Reducing the number of pots to four would be the obvious way to reduce weight and mpg. After all, BMW produce wonderful touring motorcycles which have just two cylinders - a very different beast I admit. And the great majority of cars in Europe manage perfectly well on just four cylinders. Perhaps this should be the way forward for Honda.
The game's afoot;
Follow your spirit: and upon this charge,
Cry — God for Harry! England and Saint George!

User avatar
WingAdmin
Site Admin
Posts: 17046
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 4:16 pm
Location: Strongsville, OH
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1982 GL1100A Aspencade (sold)
1989 PC800 (wife's!)
1998 XV250 Virago (sold)
2007 Aspen Sentry Trailer

Re: Rider magazine editorial

Postby WingAdmin » Thu Jan 08, 2015 11:24 am

You'd be giving up a lot of the smoothness of the six cylinder engine by reverting back to four, however. A lot of what makes for the smooth "electric motor" feel of the GL1500 and GL1800 is the extra power pulse per revolution you get from those two extra cylinders. They would do better by reducing the displacement (to reduce internal friction) and increasing compression ratio (or turbo/supercharging) to make up the difference in power. That would reduce the size and frictional power loss of the engine, but keep the smoothness and power. Of course, we'd then have to switch to premium fuel.

Let's see, as long as we're doing pie-in-the-sky changes, here's mine: a drop from a six-cylinder 1800 to a six-cylinder 1200, but with a supercharger, which maintains the low-end torque and overall horsepower we're used to. Aluminum frame and swingarm replaced with featherweight carbon fiber. Engine/transmission weight dropped by 100 lbs due to smaller displacement and use of high-strength alloys instead of steel, and magnesium engine block. Aluminum wheels, aluminum suspension members, and all non-structural steel pieces (i.e. handlebars, bracketry, etc.) replaced with magnesium. Bags and trunk reshaped to have more storage capacity in a more useful shape. Power and torque and fuel efficiency increased, while overall weight of bike dropped to 500 lbs.

How's that for a start? :)

User avatar
brettchallenger
Posts: 457
Joined: Sat May 29, 2010 11:03 am
Location: Driffield, the East Riding of Yorkshire, England
Motorcycle: 1978 Triumph Tiger TR7 (sold)
2000 Honda GL1500 SE
1985 MZ ETZ250 (a cold war special).

Re: Rider magazine editorial

Postby brettchallenger » Thu Jan 08, 2015 2:16 pm

well this thread could run and run!

The other big criticism of the Goldwing is cost, and it is an expensive bike. Here in the UK it retails at circa $38,000 - ok you can probably get a fair discount on that, but it is still one big-ticket motorcycle, in fact a brand new Jaguar can be had for a £1000 more. Start to add carbon fibre and magnesium to the package won't make it any more affordable. Moreover, I am not sure I would trust a 15 year old motorcycle (like the one I currently ride) with crucial parts made of carbon fibre.

A lot of garages in Europe simply do not stock higher octane fuel which would make it a pain, and when you can find it, it does cost a lot more - I know, having accidently filled up my Ford with the stuff.

I would still go for a refined four cylinder engine, still a boxer format, around 1.6 litre capacity. As you say, with better luggage, perhaps some of it removable. And what about an automatic gearbox as used in the Yamaha FJR1300?
The game's afoot;
Follow your spirit: and upon this charge,
Cry — God for Harry! England and Saint George!

User avatar
Mh434
Posts: 939
Joined: Tue Mar 25, 2014 10:24 pm
Location: Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
Motorcycle: 1997 gl1500 SE
Previous:
1981 GL1100I
1989 Kawasaki Concours

Re: Rider magazine editorial

Postby Mh434 » Thu Jan 08, 2015 2:23 pm

Where do I sign up?!

WA, you've put forward some seriously well thought-out ideas to push the Goldwing peanut forward into the next decade. Now, if only Mother Honda would listen!

I do like the smoothness of the 6 cylinder engine, and the low-end torque it provides. For those who haven't experienced the difference a multiplicity of cylinders can make, by way of example I recall a side-by-side test of two new Jaguar E-types (back in the early '70's). One had the then-new V-12 and the other had the straight 6. Starting from about 2-3 mph, in top gear, the two accelerated at maximum throttle. The 6-cylinder shuddered & shook a little, then slowly pulled away. The V-12, however, simply pulled away, smooth and hard, and was long gone.

Simply put (other things being equal), the more cylinder detonations (power pulses) you have per turn of the crankshaft, the smoother the engine will be.

That being said, what I'd like to see (again, pie in the sky stuff) would be, say, a 1200cc boxer-6 with (as WA suggested) a supercharger. Turbos are great, but generally speaking, they need high-RPMs to perform (not what 'Wingers usually strive for), whereas superchargers perform well all the way from idle.

WA's ideas for a major weight-reduction program for the 'Wing are spot-on. Whether the extensive use of magnesium would be viable, I don't know - it can be expensive stuff to work with. However: carbon-fiber and other composites have come of age, and their use in even structural components is becoming commonplace. Their longevity, structural strength, ability to be formed with incredible precision, and their extreme low weight, might well make them suitable for much of a 'Wing's construction. As a plus, they don't corrode, and parts intended to flex can do so without issue. Cost is still an issue, but it has come down dramatically as its use becomes more commonplace.

So - how about a 500-lb, 180 hp, supercharged 1200cc 6-cylinder 'Wing with carbon-fiber frame, fairing & fenders, and magnesium wheels? It would be a far more nimble machine (not to mention easier to pick up when...laid down), get amazing fuel economy, have a greater capacity to carry heavy loads, and never corrode!

Anyway, sorry for the diatribe, but...hey, this is fun!

User avatar
redial
Posts: 1993
Joined: Mon Jan 03, 2011 1:17 am
Location: Kapunda, SouthAustralia
Motorcycle: 1997 GL1500 Spectre Red Aspencade

Re: Rider magazine editorial

Postby redial » Thu Jan 08, 2015 6:11 pm

Continuing along this line, instead of being a "rice burner", why not an "oil burner". A diesel! Diesel gives better economy, but perhaps not quite the startling acceleration. The way diesel engines have progressed, I would definitely be interested. Electric motors may be in the future, but we still have not got the battery technology quite right.

A touring GW would be a smooth implementation of a diesel, and might be quirky enough to attract the interest of a whole new generation.
Len in Kapunda

The world is not going to finish today, as it is already tomorrow in Australia and New Zealand, and other islands of foreign nations such as Guam and Samoa.

User avatar
WingAdmin
Site Admin
Posts: 17046
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 4:16 pm
Location: Strongsville, OH
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1982 GL1100A Aspencade (sold)
1989 PC800 (wife's!)
1998 XV250 Virago (sold)
2007 Aspen Sentry Trailer

Re: Rider magazine editorial

Postby WingAdmin » Fri Jan 09, 2015 11:34 am

The main problem with a diesel is that they have incredible amounts of pressure inside the engine, which means the crank, bearings and engine block have to be built up much stronger to be able to handle these pressures. More crank and block = more weight. With current emissions standards, most modern diesels require a urea fluid to be injected into the exhaust to kill the NO2 created by running in an over-lean condition, which is required to burn the soot. You need to carry a reservoir of this fluid, along with catalytic converters. Again, more weight.

They would provide tremendous torque starting off, not so much performance at higher RPM's.

Old Wing Man
Posts: 58
Joined: Thu Oct 30, 2014 7:51 am
Location: Bismarck, Arkansas
Motorcycle: 2000 Goldwing SE

Re: Rider magazine editorial

Postby Old Wing Man » Thu Jun 04, 2015 7:32 am

I wouldn't mind seeing the same amenities as the 1800 in a 1500cc engine but with a not more than $20K price tag for a fully loaded version. I cant see anything on a GW that equals or exceeds current car amenities and many of them cost much less than a loaded "wing". I am afraid that the only way we will see price reductions is if they quit selling which has happened to an extent. My local dealer told me a few months ago that they had only sold 2 new GL1800 bikes this year. Used bikes are going well in sales, so I guess maybe at least a few folks are using some monetary sense.

While we are wishing, why not wish for some common pricing in motorcycle maintenance parts. There is simply no reason for an oil filter to cost $15 or a tire to be $200 that only last 6-12K miles. Formerly it was excused as "not enough need for them to justify manufacturing like it is for cars". Now there is about as many motorcycles around as cars so why are parts still so high.

harvey01
Posts: 628
Joined: Thu May 31, 2012 7:14 pm
Location: Henrico, Virginia
Motorcycle: 2004 GL1800

Re: Rider magazine editorial

Postby harvey01 » Thu Jun 04, 2015 9:14 am

Wing Admin,

While I like your ideas to reduce weight, you just about doubled the price tag. This lighter weight higher performance stuff comes with a pretty big price tag! And as another poster mentioned you would have to use premium gas which also adds a lot of cost over the life of the bike.

Whatever Honda builds in the form of a Gold Wing will be to a demographic that is rapidly ageing out of the market. While it is true that the Wing is now being sold in countries other than the USA, the big sales are still here and it is a declining market. Honda is obviously catering to the younger buyer as that is the future of the market. I have seen Yamaha go through two versions of the Yamaha Venture (Yamaha's touring bike) and now does not make either as the market did not support the product.

I have no crystal ball, and in fact was waiting to see the 2015 Wing to perhaps buy new but now just don't know. I might get a new one, I might keep my 04, and I am looking at other bikes perhaps better suited to me.
harvey
Ride Safe and Ride Often

User avatar
wlkjr
Posts: 49
Joined: Fri May 01, 2015 8:03 pm
Location: Georgia
Motorcycle: 1987GL1200I
Previously owned:
1983 750 Sabre
1980 CB750
1975 CB750
1973 CL350

Re: Rider magazine editorial

Postby wlkjr » Mon Jun 08, 2015 7:32 pm

I really like my '87 that I bought new. I'd like to see something along the same lines for about $12,000. I know I'm living in a dream world, but $22k for a bike is kinda steep. Not many younger guys want to fork over that kind of money.

User avatar
trike lady
Posts: 872
Joined: Thu Mar 24, 2011 5:58 pm
Location: Butler, PA
Motorcycle: 1993 GL1500 Aspencade with Voyager (Sold)
1983 GL650I SilverWing Interstate

Re: Rider magazine editorial

Postby trike lady » Mon Jun 08, 2015 8:14 pm

This is my theory. Honda could make a 'Retro' GL1200 for those who want a smaller/lighter Wing. While the Limited and SEi were fuel injected and short lived. Revive a fuel injected flat four into the styling of a GL1500 or keep the 1200 style. :mrgreen:
I.M.B.B.A. Technician II Certified

Old Wing Man
Posts: 58
Joined: Thu Oct 30, 2014 7:51 am
Location: Bismarck, Arkansas
Motorcycle: 2000 Goldwing SE

Re: Rider magazine editorial

Postby Old Wing Man » Tue Jun 09, 2015 6:41 am

I really liked the 1200 GL styling, not too much different from the 1500. I didn't care for the removable top on the saddle bags that they took care of on the 1500 but my 84 Aspencade had plenty of features for their day. Upgrade the 1200 sound system to fit todays electronics (MP3 and AM/FM/XM radio), add a built in GPS (standard $150 one not a $1000+ one) and fuel injected engine and you could have a perfect bike.
I see no reason why a bike should be more than $15K max loaded with everything needed. I don't need air bag or ABS brakes on a motorcycle so we can save those thousands nor all the bells and whistles on many of todays car stereo either, just play some music on a quality speaker system (don't have to be Bose speakers). Its a motorcycle, not a lounge chair in a home theater.

User avatar
wlkjr
Posts: 49
Joined: Fri May 01, 2015 8:03 pm
Location: Georgia
Motorcycle: 1987GL1200I
Previously owned:
1983 750 Sabre
1980 CB750
1975 CB750
1973 CL350

Re: Rider magazine editorial

Postby wlkjr » Tue Jun 09, 2015 9:56 pm

Anyone important listening?

User avatar
WingAdmin
Site Admin
Posts: 17046
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 4:16 pm
Location: Strongsville, OH
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1982 GL1100A Aspencade (sold)
1989 PC800 (wife's!)
1998 XV250 Virago (sold)
2007 Aspen Sentry Trailer

Re: Rider magazine editorial

Postby WingAdmin » Wed Jun 10, 2015 9:38 am

wlkjr wrote:Anyone important listening?


If they are, we'd never know. Honda is extremely secretive and non-communicative about this sort of thing.

I know they have at least one "anonymous" user on the site here, but they never post, and visit only occasionally.

User avatar
roadwanderer2
Posts: 4108
Joined: Thu Aug 08, 2013 4:03 am
Location: sweetwater, Tennessee
Motorcycle: 83 GL1100A aspencade, previously owned, 1981 honda GL500i silverwing interstate, 1974 yamaha xs400, 1974 Honda cb450 twin cam, 1983 honda vt30, 1982 honda 700 shadow, 1972 cb750four, and my first bike, a brand new 1982 honda CM400e. and a new to me 1986 GL1200 aspencade SEi
Contact:

Re: Rider magazine editorial

Postby roadwanderer2 » Wed Jun 10, 2015 10:20 am

WingAdmin wrote:
Let's see, as long as we're doing pie-in-the-sky changes, here's mine: a drop from a six-cylinder 1800 to a six-cylinder 1200, but with a supercharger, which maintains the low-end torque and overall horsepower we're used to. Aluminum frame and swingarm replaced with featherweight carbon fiber. Engine/transmission weight dropped by 100 lbs due to smaller displacement and use of high-strength alloys instead of steel, and magnesium engine block. Aluminum wheels, aluminum suspension members, and all non-structural steel pieces (i.e. handlebars, bracketry, etc.) replaced with magnesium. Bags and trunk reshaped to have more storage capacity in a more useful shape. Power and torque and fuel efficiency increased, while overall weight of bike dropped to 500 lbs.

How's that for a start? :)


with all the "extras" i have on my 83 aspy, the weight comes in at just under 900lbs. if it were possible to redesign the 1800 or the 1200 to what your thinking of, i would go out and purchase one tomorrow.

stuart.

User avatar
brettchallenger
Posts: 457
Joined: Sat May 29, 2010 11:03 am
Location: Driffield, the East Riding of Yorkshire, England
Motorcycle: 1978 Triumph Tiger TR7 (sold)
2000 Honda GL1500 SE
1985 MZ ETZ250 (a cold war special).

Re: Rider magazine editorial

Postby brettchallenger » Sun Jun 14, 2015 2:54 pm

Shift the production to China (like almost everything else), it would reduce the cost to $7,000
The game's afoot;
Follow your spirit: and upon this charge,
Cry — God for Harry! England and Saint George!

User avatar
roadwanderer2
Posts: 4108
Joined: Thu Aug 08, 2013 4:03 am
Location: sweetwater, Tennessee
Motorcycle: 83 GL1100A aspencade, previously owned, 1981 honda GL500i silverwing interstate, 1974 yamaha xs400, 1974 Honda cb450 twin cam, 1983 honda vt30, 1982 honda 700 shadow, 1972 cb750four, and my first bike, a brand new 1982 honda CM400e. and a new to me 1986 GL1200 aspencade SEi
Contact:

Re: Rider magazine editorial

Postby roadwanderer2 » Sun Jun 14, 2015 4:43 pm

brettchallenger wrote:Shift the production to China (like almost everything else), it would reduce the cost to $7,000


why not, almost everything bought here nowadays is assembled in Hong Kong, china or some other foreign country.

stuart.

User avatar
dingdong
Posts: 2863
Joined: Thu Apr 08, 2010 8:35 am
Location: Oklahoma City
Motorcycle: 1976 gl1000
1993 gl1500
2004 NRX1800 Rune

Re: Rider magazine editorial

Postby dingdong » Mon Jun 15, 2015 7:08 am

This is interesting. Here smaller and lighter seems to be what is wanted in a new Wing. On some of the other sites most are wishing for a larger displacement engine. 2 liter or larger which seems to me overkill on a motorcycle. Less expensive is my wish. I won't ever purchase a motorcycle for what a new Wing or any other high end bike costs.
Tom

A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.

Old Wing Man
Posts: 58
Joined: Thu Oct 30, 2014 7:51 am
Location: Bismarck, Arkansas
Motorcycle: 2000 Goldwing SE

Re: Rider magazine editorial

Postby Old Wing Man » Mon Jun 15, 2015 7:42 am

I really don't know why one needs a 1.8 or 2 liter engine on a Goldwing? Not many folks hot rod them like the crotch rocket riders. There really is no reason in the world to have a touring motorcycle engine bigger than many car engines. It is like the motorcycle companies never caught up with Detroit and their muscle cars from the 70's, which some companies are coming back with by the way with large displacement V12 engines with 700+HP in luxury cars. What the Heck are they thinking that you need that kind of HP or 200 MPH speeds in a luxury car. Touring motorcycles don't need super large engines either, they need lighter and easier to handle components to make the ride more enjoyable, not supercharged 2 or 3 liter engines. The Boss Hoss cycles have the biggest engine title already with a 427 in their bikes and don't need any competition from Honda or any other touring bike.
As long as a bike will cruise down the road at interstate speeds with 2 up pulling a trailer, what else do you need. An 1100 GW will do that nicely.

User avatar
WingAdmin
Site Admin
Posts: 17046
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 4:16 pm
Location: Strongsville, OH
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1982 GL1100A Aspencade (sold)
1989 PC800 (wife's!)
1998 XV250 Virago (sold)
2007 Aspen Sentry Trailer

Re: Rider magazine editorial

Postby WingAdmin » Mon Jun 15, 2015 10:23 am

It's complex - to get the smoothness of a horizontally-opposed 6 cylinder engine, you have a lot of compromises. There is a lot of internal friction running six cylinders (as opposed to two, for instance) that eats up horsepower. The engine is physically bigger, which means the bike is bigger, which means more weight. More weight means more power required from the engine. More power pushing more weight means a beefier transmission and driveline are required, which is more weight again, which means more power required.

There are two ways to increase power. One is increased displacement. Increased displacement means more internal friction and reduced mileage, which increases cost of ownership. It also increases heat output, which means a larger cooling system required, which means more weight.

The second is increased compression ratio, which reduces reliability and longevity due to increased internal loads, and also increases weight due to beefed-up engine components. It also increases heat output, and requires the use of premium fuel, which increases cost of ownership.

So you can see, it's a little more complex than just putting a bigger engine in to haul around all that weight. Without question, the cheapest and simplest solution to the problem is to reduce weight, which reduces the requirement for power. A perfect example is the GL1100 Aspencade. While no slouch, it is not the fastest bike - certainly not sportbike fast. Remove the couple hundred pounds of fairing, bags and accessories, and the bike suddenly turns into a rocket.

User avatar
roadwanderer2
Posts: 4108
Joined: Thu Aug 08, 2013 4:03 am
Location: sweetwater, Tennessee
Motorcycle: 83 GL1100A aspencade, previously owned, 1981 honda GL500i silverwing interstate, 1974 yamaha xs400, 1974 Honda cb450 twin cam, 1983 honda vt30, 1982 honda 700 shadow, 1972 cb750four, and my first bike, a brand new 1982 honda CM400e. and a new to me 1986 GL1200 aspencade SEi
Contact:

Re: Rider magazine editorial

Postby roadwanderer2 » Mon Jun 15, 2015 10:37 am

i for one cant complain about my 4cyl 1100 aspy. its got plenty of power. once you get out of first gear and power up thru 2nd, 3rd, and 4th gear, the power of the 1100 is awesome especially if your going onto an interstate and have to get up to 70-75mph in a hurry from the entrance lane. this 1100 has just as much power as my 700 shadow had but with a little more weight. if your looking for power you can build yourself one of these. take a look at this i found from another thread......

Image

stuart.

User avatar
brettchallenger
Posts: 457
Joined: Sat May 29, 2010 11:03 am
Location: Driffield, the East Riding of Yorkshire, England
Motorcycle: 1978 Triumph Tiger TR7 (sold)
2000 Honda GL1500 SE
1985 MZ ETZ250 (a cold war special).

Re: Rider magazine editorial

Postby brettchallenger » Mon Jun 15, 2015 11:16 am

I think the number of cylinders is where Wingman and I have to disagree. I still feel that just four cylinders in a boxer arrangement (with a 1.6 litre engine) would give adequate smoothness - it is after all a motorcycle, not a limousine and would offer the best compromise in terms of weight reduction without recourse to exotic/expensive material usage. I have to admit though, most of my motorcycle experience has been with single and twin cylinder machines, and to some extent I do miss the thump of the engine and at least some vibration. It seemed to make me feel more at one with the bike.


The game's afoot;
Follow your spirit: and upon this charge,
Cry — God for Harry! England and Saint George!


Return to “Goldwing Chat”




Who is online

Users browsing this forum: squirrel and 4 guests