Questions regarding "older" men and Goldwings


Anything goes - doesn't fit any other category!
  • Sponsored Links
User avatar
WingAdmin
Site Admin
Posts: 19042
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 4:16 pm
Location: Strongsville, OH
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1982 GL1100A Aspencade (sold)
1989 PC800 (wife's!)
1998 XV250 Virago (sold)
2007 Aspen Sentry Trailer

Re: Questions regarding "older" men and Goldwings

Post by WingAdmin » Tue Sep 01, 2015 7:08 pm



5150Jim wrote:I just want to thank you for putting this in the newsletter this month and it could NOT have come at a better time. I'm on my 3rd Goldwing but the 1st two were much lighter. I had a 76 GL1000 & I have a 80 GL1100, but about 30 or so days ago I got a 89 GL1500 & what a beast!!! I switch back & forth & have been thinking about how much better the 1100 handles. Now I have some info & videos to work on handling the 1500 at slow speeds. TNX again... And my wife will be happier... She was worried about stopping & slow speeds (from the backseat).
PS. I'm 65 years old but it's not to much to handle yet.
Great! I also went from a GL1100 to a GL1500, and the GL1500 felt like a massive "beast" at first...but once I got the feel of it, I quickly realized it is actually easier to manhandle around than the 1100, thanks to the lower center of gravity and lower seating position.



User avatar
spiralout
Posts: 1202
Joined: Sun Feb 17, 2013 6:41 pm
Location: Alabama
Motorcycle: 1975 GL1000 (gone)
1980 GL1100I (with '77 1000 engine)
1996 GL1500 SE

Re: Questions regarding "older" men and Goldwings

Post by spiralout » Tue Sep 01, 2015 7:58 pm

I was wondering why this thread had so many posts today then realized it was featured in the newsletter. I see that it's made first time posters of two folks who have been members for 5 years and one with 10 posts in 5 years. Very cool. 8-)

User avatar
crazyh
Posts: 1
Joined: Sun May 15, 2011 6:03 pm
Location: Hamilton, New Zealand
Motorcycle: 1988 GL1500/6

Re: Questions regarding "older" men and Goldwings

Post by crazyh » Tue Sep 01, 2015 8:20 pm

My way of dealing with this non issue at 61, keep your bike longer, don't buy a new one every 5 minutes to keep up with the Joneses.
My trusty workhorse I bought in 1988 brand spanking new - a Honda Goldwing 1500/6 - note the pride by which I wrote that out in full.
That makes her a classic and me an ol fart, but I tell you after having slid down the road braking bones and shedding plastic together, running circles around Harley's to name but two of the many many tales we can tell toghether, I am still deeply in love with my Wing.
I swing a leg now and I suddenly wheigh 500 kilos, bottom line, spend time with your machine, let your relationship mature, learn her querks and you become one.
Mind you, easy to say for one that wheigh's in at 122 Kg and tops out at a no nonsence 6'4".
Don't worry about it, there is always an alternative, however the motorcycling gods forbid me to mention it here.

Rob D
New Zealand

User avatar
mytown
Posts: 204
Joined: Wed Oct 31, 2012 11:54 am
Location: Carbondale, Illinois
Motorcycle: 1982 Goldwing Interstate

Re: Questions regarding "older" men and Goldwings

Post by mytown » Wed Sep 02, 2015 4:01 am

Ken Styles wrote: Whats the attraction to such a heavy bike?
Being a heavy rider. In my youth my BSA was weight appropriate:


Now not so much:


I think I'd look like a circus clown on anything much smaller.

User avatar
Raysur52
Posts: 5
Joined: Sat Sep 14, 2013 6:50 am
Location: London, England, United Kingdom
Motorcycle: 2004 ABS

Re: Questions regarding "older" men and Goldwings

Post by Raysur52 » Wed Sep 02, 2015 4:35 pm

Hi all
I read most of the comments and found it informative. My 2004 1800ABS is lovely and enjoy my rides. Yes the beast is heavy and it does worry me slightly as I have had one mishap in the garage, my fault entirely, wrong side of bike moving back slowly to get to front valve and side stand touched something and was moved and on leaning over side stand was up and when then the weight took me with it, scary heavy and a learning curve for me, even though it rested on something it wasnt too hard too pull it back (and then panic does make you stronger), and damage was just a small nick but could have much worse for the purple paint. So methinks all in all respect the wing and it will treat you right and this site always gives me confidence in riding the wing. Oh by the way I'm 63.
Regards
Ray

Eros GL1800
Posts: 2
Joined: Thu Sep 03, 2015 9:29 am
Location: Seattle, Wa
Motorcycle: 1984 GL1200 Aspencade, 2008 GL1800 GoldWing

Re: Questions regarding "older" men and Goldwings

Post by Eros GL1800 » Thu Sep 03, 2015 9:41 am

Hi all. I'm a retired Seattle PD motor Officer, rode 27 years on motors. Done a lot of training, Etc. It's my experience that weight has very little to do with your riding. Center of gravity of the motorcycle is what matters. This, and foot position while riding are the two most important aspects of motorcycle "fit". I'm now 60 and riding a GL1800. Shorter wheel base, lower C.G., handles like a sport touring bike and fits me perfect. My GL 1200 Aspencade on the other hand has a high C.G. and longer wheel base. A little harder for me to pick up if dropped and rides like a boat.

Greasy side down!
Dean

User avatar
Slick Willi
Posts: 13
Joined: Mon Jun 22, 2015 9:36 pm
Location: Jacksonville, Florida
Motorcycle: 1987 GL1200I Interstate

Re: Questions regarding "older" men and Goldwings

Post by Slick Willi » Thu Sep 03, 2015 3:37 pm

Hello all:
While some say the 1200 rides like a boat, I agree with the guy that said it was more like a sport bike on steroids :o I'm 56 years of age, and have ridden mostly sport bikes. However, age and wisdom has convinced me to slow down. So I got me a Harley, (the most uncomfortable bike I ever rode). So I got rid of that and recently bought an 87 1200 Interstate. I have found that my wing handles great. I am a fan forever!
I do agree that if you are having difficulty handling your bike, whatever model, a parking lot is a great place to get better.
Like anything, wisdom comes with age. Just keep riding!!!!
Slick Willi 8-)

rcornelson
Posts: 3
Joined: Mon Sep 12, 2011 10:47 am
Location: Grove, OK
Motorcycle: 1989 GL1500

Re: Questions regarding "older" men and Goldwings

Post by rcornelson » Thu Sep 03, 2015 4:35 pm

My only comment other than the ones posted is to really watch where you put your foot down when you are stopping. I'm 78 and ride often, have for 40+ years and have placed my foot on loose sand/gravel and then lost my footing resulting in the bike going down on the guards. Fortunately the few times I have done this there have been friends around to help this old weak guy to get it upright again. Have seen the video's on how to raise it by using my legs but have never had to attempt that....Yet....Great bike the 1500 I have owned mine since 1992 and have 72000 miles on it and haven't wore it out yet. Enjoy your ride.

User avatar
NVSB4
Posts: 1216
Joined: Sat Mar 03, 2012 6:39 pm
Location: Arlington, Texas
Motorcycle: 1996 GL1500SE
1992 GL1500I (sold)
1986 GL1200A (sold)
2002 HD FXDL Low Rider (sold)
1993 Yamaha Virago XV1000 (sold)
Too many others to list

Re: Questions regarding "older" men and Goldwings

Post by NVSB4 » Thu Sep 03, 2015 5:01 pm

Man, glad to see this post is pulling so much interest from a lot of "new" people (less than 10 posts).

Welcome to the forum!
Please keep chiming in, we welcome your experience.
It's never too late to have a happy childhood!

Image

Image
Red=All bikes Blue=Wings

Chris

User avatar
bodasefus
Posts: 27
Joined: Tue Apr 07, 2015 4:49 pm
Location: Lehigh Acres, Fl
Motorcycle: 1990 Honda Goldwing GL1500

Re: Questions regarding "older" men and Goldwings

Post by bodasefus » Thu Sep 03, 2015 5:24 pm

I am on my second wing... I am 75 yrs old... My first was a 84 1200 Aspy and my first experience with a heavy cruiser... I have owned 3 Harleys and there will not be a 4th... My current ride,,, a 1990 GL1500... She is in the shop getting the Austone 175R16 Taxi Tire Tubeless Radial tire on the back... I have put car tires on most of my bikes... We will see...
I am looking at adding a sidecar for my scoot... I will give me more stability and extend my riding years... I pull a trailer which has my camping gear in... My mobility is not what it used to be but when you are on the road with the cruise control on with my tunes playing,,, does not get much better than that... I read somewhere that at the NASSIR 8 rally that is coming up is having a slow riding class... If so,,, I am in for that... any way to extend the safety aspect of my riding... Two wheels has been my shrink for many of years...
Bodasefus

Don't take life to seriously,,,
No one gets out alive

fruffing
Posts: 7
Joined: Tue Jun 23, 2015 6:57 pm
Location: Loudon, NH
Motorcycle: 1990 Gl1500SEW

Re: Questions regarding "older" men and Goldwings

Post by fruffing » Thu Sep 03, 2015 8:18 pm

Here is something I learned. When coming to a stop, I get into neutral early; maybe at 10 to 15 mph. Then I coast, brake down to low speed just to the point where balance starts to be a problem. Simultaneously I hit the front brake hard and put down my feet. Hitting the brake lowers the bike making it easier to balance the bike with my feet and eliminating the very slow speed where the bike is hard to handle. I may move a couple of inches from the time I hit the brake until I am fully stopped. Try it; I think you will like it. Works for me.

User avatar
NVSB4
Posts: 1216
Joined: Sat Mar 03, 2012 6:39 pm
Location: Arlington, Texas
Motorcycle: 1996 GL1500SE
1992 GL1500I (sold)
1986 GL1200A (sold)
2002 HD FXDL Low Rider (sold)
1993 Yamaha Virago XV1000 (sold)
Too many others to list

Re: Questions regarding "older" men and Goldwings

Post by NVSB4 » Thu Sep 03, 2015 8:40 pm

fruffing wrote:Here is something I learned. When coming to a stop, I get into neutral early; maybe at 10 to 15 mph. Then I coast, brake down to low speed just to the point where balance starts to be a problem. Simultaneously I hit the front brake hard and put down my feet. Hitting the brake lowers the bike making it easier to balance the bike with my feet and eliminating the very slow speed where the bike is hard to handle. I may move a couple of inches from the time I hit the brake until I am fully stopped. Try it; I think you will like it. Works for me.
I wish there was a sarcasm detector here. :o
It's never too late to have a happy childhood!

Image

Image
Red=All bikes Blue=Wings

Chris

User avatar
dingdong
Posts: 3388
Joined: Thu Apr 08, 2010 8:35 am
Location: Oklahoma City
Motorcycle: 1976 gl1000
1993 gl1500
2004 NRX1800 Rune

Re: Questions regarding "older" men and Goldwings

Post by dingdong » Fri Sep 04, 2015 7:33 am

fruffing wrote:Here is something I learned. When coming to a stop, I get into neutral early; maybe at 10 to 15 mph. Then I coast, brake down to low speed just to the point where balance starts to be a problem. Simultaneously I hit the front brake hard and put down my feet. Hitting the brake lowers the bike making it easier to balance the bike with my feet and eliminating the very slow speed where the bike is hard to handle. I may move a couple of inches from the time I hit the brake until I am fully stopped. Try it; I think you will like it. Works for me.
A quick stop without coasting works for me too. I pick a spot where I want to stop and don't drag my feet. I never go into neutral however. There have been many times when I have had to accelerate out of a problem so I keep her in gear. Can't do that in neutral.

Tom
Tom

A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.

User avatar
WingAdmin
Site Admin
Posts: 19042
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 4:16 pm
Location: Strongsville, OH
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1982 GL1100A Aspencade (sold)
1989 PC800 (wife's!)
1998 XV250 Virago (sold)
2007 Aspen Sentry Trailer

Re: Questions regarding "older" men and Goldwings

Post by WingAdmin » Fri Sep 04, 2015 11:17 am

dingdong wrote:
fruffing wrote:Here is something I learned. When coming to a stop, I get into neutral early; maybe at 10 to 15 mph. Then I coast, brake down to low speed just to the point where balance starts to be a problem. Simultaneously I hit the front brake hard and put down my feet. Hitting the brake lowers the bike making it easier to balance the bike with my feet and eliminating the very slow speed where the bike is hard to handle. I may move a couple of inches from the time I hit the brake until I am fully stopped. Try it; I think you will like it. Works for me.
A quick stop without coasting works for me too. I pick a spot where I want to stop and don't drag my feet. I never go into neutral however. There have been many times when I have had to accelerate out of a problem so I keep her in gear. Can't do that in neutral.

Tom
I was just about to say the same thing. I also tend to come to a stop reasonably quickly - but the only time I shift into neutral pretty much is when I'm about to shut the bike off. I might do it if I'm stuck at a long light and there is a long line of traffic already behind me. But any time there's any chance that a car might be able to come up behind me, then I'm in first gear with the clutch held in, ready to get the hell out of the way of the idiot driver who is paying more attention to his/her phone than the motorcycle sitting stopped in front of him.

Eros GL1800
Posts: 2
Joined: Thu Sep 03, 2015 9:29 am
Location: Seattle, Wa
Motorcycle: 1984 GL1200 Aspencade, 2008 GL1800 GoldWing

Re: Questions regarding "older" men and Goldwings

Post by Eros GL1800 » Fri Sep 04, 2015 3:50 pm

Coasting to a stop in neutral is a bad idea. Coasting to a stop means you've lost two of your three friction triangles and you're relying solely on your balancing ability and brakes to get you stopped while still in an upright position. Your engine winding down gives you nice, even rear end braking (lost if you're in neutral), feathering your clutch into the stop gives you gyro effect (helping to keep you upright) and your engine and drive train (also gyroscopes) deceleration and friction help keep you under control and upright while slowing (lost if you're in neutral), and you end up relying solely on your personal ability to brake smoothly to a stop in all conditions. By taking away your motorcycle's systems you are placing yourself in serious jeopardy and relying solely upon your braking skills. Works just fine if everything comes together every time. But how often does that happen? And, if all of a sudden you hear or see someone sliding up behind you on the wet pavement, you're screwed. No way you'll get that bike back in gear and escape in time.

"Clutch, Throttle, Brake" are the solution. You do a lock turn for two full 360's with ease without putting a foot down and you can nail any problem with high center of gravity. Here's how it works; You barely start the bike in a slow, straight line, you go as slow as you can while staying balanced, you turn one way or the other while feathering your clutch, moderating your throttle, and feathering your rear brake. You do big circles to start with. If you get dizzy reverse direction. As you become more and more comfortable tighten the circle. With just a few hours of this you'll discover that your triple tree is against its' stop (thus "locked") and you're doing lock turns. This is the most basic element of police motorcycle operation. None of us are allowed to progress to more advanced skills until we master this.

And - you look cooler because you never have to put two feet down to keep the bike upright when you come to a stop!

Please excuse my disagreement on this. I've always tried to just talk bikes here. But when I read this and I followed the rest of the thread it appears to me that the original question may involve a less experienced rider. Stopping in neutral is unsafe even for the most experienced rider so I had to pitch in. I just don't want anyone getting hurt when they drop their' bike at a red light because the front tire slid out on the pavement, or get rear ended and get injured, or worse.

Regards,
Dean (Motor Officer - 27 years, and riding since age 14)

User avatar
NVSB4
Posts: 1216
Joined: Sat Mar 03, 2012 6:39 pm
Location: Arlington, Texas
Motorcycle: 1996 GL1500SE
1992 GL1500I (sold)
1986 GL1200A (sold)
2002 HD FXDL Low Rider (sold)
1993 Yamaha Virago XV1000 (sold)
Too many others to list

Re: Questions regarding "older" men and Goldwings

Post by NVSB4 » Fri Sep 04, 2015 4:32 pm

Eros GL1800 wrote:Please excuse my disagreement on this. I've always tried to just talk bikes here. But when I read this and I followed the rest of the thread it appears to me that the original question may involve a less experienced rider. Stopping in neutral is unsafe even for the most experienced rider so I had to pitch in. I just don't want anyone getting hurt when they drop their' bike at a red light because the front tire slid out on the pavement, or get rear ended and get injured, or worse.
That's why I commented about a sarcasm detector. I was hoping that he was kidding and just trying to get a rise out of some of us (which still may be the case).
Otherwise, I can't imagine someone riding for any length of time without this catching up with them.
Last edited by NVSB4 on Fri Sep 04, 2015 4:35 pm, edited 1 time in total.
It's never too late to have a happy childhood!

Image

Image
Red=All bikes Blue=Wings

Chris

User avatar
WingAdmin
Site Admin
Posts: 19042
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 4:16 pm
Location: Strongsville, OH
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1982 GL1100A Aspencade (sold)
1989 PC800 (wife's!)
1998 XV250 Virago (sold)
2007 Aspen Sentry Trailer

Re: Questions regarding "older" men and Goldwings

Post by WingAdmin » Fri Sep 04, 2015 4:34 pm

That's a point I also neglected to mention - when I come to a stop, my right foot rarely leaves the brake. I shift to first before coming to a stop, continuing to brake both front and rear, and as I'm just about to come to a complete stop, I put my left foot down on the ground. While I'm at a stop, only my left foot is on the ground. When I start off, I just let go of the clutch, lift my foot off the ground, and I'm off.

User avatar
seabeechief
Posts: 269
Joined: Wed Sep 28, 2011 9:31 pm
Location: Canyon Lake, Texas
Motorcycle: 2008 GL1800

Re: Questions regarding "older" men and Goldwings

Post by seabeechief » Fri Sep 04, 2015 8:56 pm

I'm approaching early "geezer-hood" myself. I just turned 70 and I just had my '08 GL1800 triked out because I was having pretty bad anxiety problems with my balance, especially at low speeds, and more especially with my bride on the back. I've put about 300 miles on the new Roadsmith HTS, and so far I'm really comfortable with my decision. I think it will extend my riding for several years, barring some unforeseen problem. I agree with all the guys preaching practice, practice, practice. Regardless of the challenge, nothing will take the place of experience. Practice, have fun, and ride every time the opportunity presents itself.

Chief
Combat Vets Association - San Antonio
Patriot Guard Riders - San Antonio & Austin
Darkside #1609

Flyn Tiger
Posts: 145
Joined: Mon Oct 28, 2013 9:12 pm
Location: Monroe, Louisiana
Motorcycle: Black 2002 GL1800 w/ABS

Re: Questions regarding "older" men and Goldwings

Post by Flyn Tiger » Fri Sep 04, 2015 11:47 pm

I'm 52, 6'2". Talk about a change, I went from racing motocross on a 220 lb bike to a Goldwing. As others have stated the secret is ride, ride, ride. I have a State Trooper friend who is also a instructor for their bike division. He teaches the precision riding classes and he gave me some pointers. If you can take one of these classes and practice in your driveway or a parking lot, you will be dragging the sides in no time. Even when I am in traffic I practice the Slow Ride, meaning how slow can I go and for how long without putting my foot down. This practice will help you with learning balance on the bike. Again ride, ride, ride and you will be riding that Wing like a sport bike.

Now if you have bad knees, you may have to get a trike or something as you lose strength in your legs. That is just a fact of life.

User avatar
lmandb
Posts: 1
Joined: Tue Apr 02, 2013 9:46 pm
Location: agoura hills, ca
Motorcycle: 1997 goldwing

Re: Questions regarding "older" men and Goldwings

Post by lmandb » Mon Sep 07, 2015 11:15 am

Hi all, I've been wondering the same thing about my riding career. I'm 72 and been riding my whole life. In fact just finished a 6000 mile trip from California back to the Blue Ridge Parkway. Although the ride was great the ride home became a long and a tiresome one. Thinking about maybe renting a bike in an area I might want to ride. However back to the issue. When will I have to go to three wheels because of balance and lack of strength to hold up a big bike. I'm not sure when that will happen to me but I think my body will be the one who tells me. I'm thinking more about it mare each year I agree that practice in slow riding is the best way too learn how to handle a Goldwing.

FM-USA
Posts: 2616
Joined: Wed May 18, 2011 8:40 am
Location: here, there
Motorcycle: mc

Re: Questions regarding "older" men and Goldwings

Post by FM-USA » Mon Sep 07, 2015 2:57 pm

I'm going to chime in on this since it seems everyone is missing something... stretch & exercise.
Yes we are getting older but that does not mean we have to go to pot.

.. .. .. Is this Déjà vu? Feels like I already commented on this.
:shock:
"Tact is the ability to tell someone to go to hell in such a way that they look forward to the trip." W.C.

User avatar
trenaud
Posts: 10
Joined: Thu May 21, 2015 1:07 pm
Location: phoenix, az
Motorcycle: 1987 GL1200A Aspencade
previous:
1979 CB750K Ltd
1978 CB750K
1975 400F Super Sport
1976 XL100
1975 XR75

Re: Questions regarding "older" men and Goldwings

Post by trenaud » Wed Sep 09, 2015 7:18 pm

As a junior old fart who was born on 2 wheels before learning 4, 8 & 12, I am thoroughly enjoying my first season on my gl1200a battle cruiser. Not without initial trepidation, a few misplanted feet, and some ruined shorts. This topic has been nothing short of inspiring and an honor to read. I'd ride with you gentlemen any day.
"Come my friends, 'tis not too late to seek a newer world,
Push off and sitting well in order smite the sounding furrows...
We are not now that strength which in old days moved earth and heaven, that which we are we are.
One equal temper of heroic hearts.
To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield."
Great, I have an iffy voltage regulator and for my 1st post I quote Tennyson.

FM-USA
Posts: 2616
Joined: Wed May 18, 2011 8:40 am
Location: here, there
Motorcycle: mc

Re: Questions regarding "older" men and Goldwings

Post by FM-USA » Wed Sep 09, 2015 7:56 pm

.
Old Farts get older and ripe'r.

.
"Tact is the ability to tell someone to go to hell in such a way that they look forward to the trip." W.C.

User avatar
rockford75
Posts: 87
Joined: Sun Sep 08, 2013 3:16 am
Location: EDMONTON Alberta,Canada
Motorcycle: 1982 Honda Goldwing 1100 Interstate

Re: Questions regarding "older" men and Goldwings

Post by rockford75 » Thu Sep 10, 2015 4:17 pm

First off I ride a 82 Goldwing in my opinion that was one of the best years for the Goldwing. Perfect balance not to many bells and whistles it has all you need. it comes in at just under 700lbs. Soon as Honda put a reverse gear on the wing then its to heavy and has to many options on it.its like riding in my truck. if i wanted to ride in my truck i wouldnt be riding a motorcycle. lol... But no matter what kind of bike you ride it takes practice to get the hang of the bike. Every bike is different. Goldwings are comfortable and i love the storage I have on my bike.
A BIKE IS LIKE A AIRPLANE Maintenance Maintenance!

User avatar
BillyBarcode
Posts: 18
Joined: Sat Jun 27, 2015 9:36 am
Location: Carvel, Alberta, CANADA
Motorcycle: 1983 GL1100I Interstate

Re: Questions regarding "older" men and Goldwings

Post by BillyBarcode » Thu Sep 10, 2015 4:48 pm

rockford75 wrote:First off I ride a 82 Goldwing in my opinion that was one of the best years for the Goldwing. Perfect balance not to many bells and whistles it has all you need. it comes in at just under 700lbs. Soon as Honda put a reverse gear on the wing then its to heavy and has to many options on it.its like riding in my truck. if i wanted to ride in my truck i wouldnt be riding a motorcycle. lol... But no matter what kind of bike you ride it takes practice to get the hang of the bike. Every bike is different. Goldwings are comfortable and i love the storage I have on my bike.


Well as a fellow Wing nut living just west of you in Parkland County, and riding an '83, and also owning a truck, I find we have a great deal in common (except the year of my bike). I'm old too...hope to meet you on the road sometime - not in your truck.

Greetings from Carvel, AB

Bill



Post Reply