Screw in the tire


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WingAdmin
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Screw in the tire

Postby WingAdmin » Fri Sep 11, 2015 3:49 pm



I thought I'd share a picture of a GL1800 rear tire that I took off its rim the other day. I took a couple pictures just before I chucked it, so I might share it with everyone.

From the outside, it's just a little screw head buried in the tire:

Tire outside
Tire outside


However, once the tire was removed...whoa!!

Tire inside
Tire inside



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Aussie81Interstate
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Re: Screw in the tire

Postby Aussie81Interstate » Fri Sep 11, 2015 4:30 pm

That is nasty,

Was it your bike? Also amazing that it went through - there doesn't seem to be a sharp point to the screw, but the tyre has definitely been compromised.

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Re: Screw in the tire

Postby made2care » Fri Sep 11, 2015 5:26 pm

That's screwly amazing !

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Re: Screw in the tire

Postby brettchallenger » Sat Sep 12, 2015 11:50 am

It really is amazing. If you purposely tried to put a screw like that into your tyre you would find it very hard work if not impossible. And yet it has occurred by accident. It hasn't even got a sharp pointed end.
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ankgrays
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Re: Screw in the tire

Postby ankgrays » Sat Sep 12, 2015 10:09 pm

Oh...just plug it...it'll be fine!! :lol:
I don't tolerate voluntary stupidity very well, and it seems to be rampant now-a-days.

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Re: Screw in the tire

Postby FM-USA » Tue Sep 15, 2015 4:46 pm

.
My sentiments also, plug/patch it and keep going.







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Re: Screw in the tire

Postby wingman12 » Tue Sep 15, 2015 5:11 pm

I would have replaced the tire also, with a (screw) bolt of that size it would have damaged the wires within the casing and compromised the integrity of the tire. with a hole of that size, moisture gets into the casing and corrodes the steel mesh quickly. even though it looks like the tire was pretty new change it. :D :D

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Re: Screw in the tire

Postby WingAdmin » Wed Sep 16, 2015 9:45 am

Yup, the tire is long gone, went to the dump last week. To me, once a motorcycle tire is damaged this way, the only thing a plug is good for is to get you home so that you can replace the tire.

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Re: Screw in the tire

Postby FM-USA » Wed Sep 16, 2015 10:27 pm

FIRST, everyone has there druthers, experiences, abilities and knowledge.
Most will patch that tire and ride and change it ASAP. Others will plug and ride while watching the pressure and if it held they'll keep riding. Others still will call a towing service on the spot.

I had a rear E3 tire that had a very similar bolt like yours and I used the patch/plug (like I posted) and it never gave any problems. The tire was changed when the (time to change this tire) bars were showing. I did slather a good amount of sealer in that hole before inserting that plug/patch so the cords were sealed from the weather. How I know? I cut that patch open to check, cords were pristine. Did I get lucky? Maybe, I've been patching tires and tubes a very long time.
Back in the early 70's my car was due for the junk yard, engine was going. I'd get double my money if I drove it in. One tire needed a plug but didn't have one. HUMMmmm, OK, vacated all the air out till it was flat on the ground. Lifted the tire off the ground which created a slight vacuum in said tire, then took clear silicone and filled that hole good. Next day I drove it 10 miles to the J-yard. Curious, I spit on that plug, yup, still sealed.
BUT I would NOT suggest that to anyone, it was just a one time experience.
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Re: Screw in the tire

Postby wingman12 » Wed Sep 16, 2015 10:46 pm

We all, in our younger days have taken chances on 4 wheels that I don't think we would take today. I am quite sure I would not have done that with my ww11 bsa motorcycle, even at the young age of 16. Then I knew I was invincible, it worked I am still here at 70 plus. Patching a tube is a lot different from plugging a tire, and the speeds of the bikes have increased considerably since the early 60's. Or from the 40's vintage bikes. Fl---, how is the super brace working for you?

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Re: Screw in the tire

Postby FM-USA » Wed Sep 16, 2015 11:39 pm

BRACE, believe it or not, I just installed it earlier today, Wednesday. Been so busy trying to catch up home-stuff here at home.
I did take it out after installing, it does feel different tho not really sure since the ride was only around the block.
Tomorrow could/should be the test, I'm hauling my trailer of tools.
"OIL CHANGE?" _FM 07-2009
Know its new taste and be loyal, you'll know when to change that oil.
Taste testing as the miles flow, souring as that acid grows.
And don't flirt with dirt or darkened oil, all the faster your engine will spoil.

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Re: Screw in the tire

Postby gold83wing » Fri Apr 01, 2016 6:08 am

I had a similar incident, a nail in my 83 wing rear tire, plugged it to finish the ride, forgot to replace it, the next year, the tire blew while on the highway, everyone luckily was fine. An experience I never want again.
please replace any tire with a temporary plug

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Re: Screw in the tire

Postby maintainer » Fri Apr 01, 2016 6:32 am

There is no reason not to plug a rear tire if you can do it properly with a quality plug in the the tread, not the sidewall. I wouldn't plug a front tire for obvious reasons. I have never had a tire failure or even a slow leak after plugging one and have ran them until worn out. As a matter of fact my current rear tire has been plugged for thousands of miles now. Everyone knows of some obscure horror story on why this "could" be dangerous. Poppy ****, I am not going to toss an otherwise decent rear tire that can be plugged. To me thats just wasteful for the sake of a warm fuzzy feeling, and not necessary. To each his own.
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Re: Screw in the tire

Postby sr71cbx » Fri Apr 01, 2016 9:17 am

That tire is definitely SCREWED.

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Re: Screw in the tire

Postby Stu_O » Fri Apr 01, 2016 12:13 pm

To Each His Own is a good way to approach life, not abusing others for their opinions or forcing ours down others' throats. But I think it's also important for us to continue to hear and consider the opinions of others, rather than rejecting out-of-hand information that conflicts with our decisions. You never know - you might see or hear something that would change your mind and maybe even save your bacon. Here's my enlightening experience from way back when that changed my mind about motorcycle tire repairs.

Previous to owning a Gold Wing, I'd been riding 4-cylinder, air cooled UJMs weighing around 550 pounds. Picking up a nail or screw always seemed to happen to a nearly new tire. Not to worry. Because I'd plugged plenty of car tires successfully, I had no issues with using a rope-style plug in a m/c tire and did so many times with not a single negative consequence. I considered these repairs permanent and often rode the tire till tread wear dictated replacement. Then came my first Wing, an '87 Aspencade. With only 600 miles on a fresh set of tires, I picked up a nail in the rear somewhere in Nowhere, Utah. Rubber cement, rope plugs, compressor...I was back on the road in minutes. I finished that trip and returned home with around 1,500 miles on the tires. The trip was ridden solo, on 2-lane rural roads, and at speeds mostly below 70 mph. Honda Hoot was coming up, and I had plenty of tire remaining for the expected 5,000 mile round trip, so off we went, 2-up and loaded to the hilt. I figure the bike weighed around 1,150 pounds, including cargo and people.

Whenever I'm on a repaired tire, I visually examine the repair at every gas stop and check the pressure each morning, especially when on a trip. This trip was no different. We were heading from Phoenix to Asheville, N.C. via Jacksonville, Fla. and stopped in Seguin, Texas for gas on the second day. Total trip mileage was about 1,000 at that point, all on the Slab at around 75 mph. Tire inspection at the previous fill-up showed no issues, so imagine my surprise 150 miles later in Seguin when I saw a large, deep, jagged-edged crater at the repair with the plug poking up from the center. It resembled a giant, tamperproof Torx head fastener. Soapy water showed it wasn't leaking, so we called it quits for the day and limped slowly to a local motel, where I dismounted the wheel and a local GWRRA member drove me to the local Honda shop for a fresh tire. What did I learn? I learned the fact that just because a particular practice hasn't created problems yet isn't proof that it can't or won't. I learned that unlike tires on 4-wheelers, motorcycle tire treads face constantly changing directional forces that can damage a plug and the rubber surrounding it. I learned that unlike a lighter bike or one ridden with less load and at lower speed, a Wing's rear tire on a heavily loaded bike and at higher speeds can get hot enough to burn your hand, even with correct inflation pressure. Finally, I learned that when tire makers say to use a repaired tire as if it were one load rating and one speed rating down from what's on the sidewall, that advice should be heeded. I'd ignored it. The carcass of a tire with a plugged hole is compromised structurally. And while a plug may allow the tire to hold pressure, the structural integrity is not restored. Take what you will (or won't) from this story, but it certainly changed my mind about considering a repaired m/c tire as safe to use normally till it's worn out.

Stu O

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Re: Screw in the tire

Postby mweddy@gmail.com » Fri Apr 01, 2016 1:52 pm

I like to get every last mile out of my tires, so I would patch it from the inside.
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Re: Screw in the tire

Postby OldZX11Rider » Fri Apr 01, 2016 4:17 pm

I once ran a screw through a rear tire that had less than a hundred miles on it.
Had to pull the tire off the wheel to patch the tube. Replaced my leaky tube with a brand new one as soon as I could.
I had heard motorcycle tires should be replaced after a flat, but after spending so much money for the tire that morning, I just couldn't bring myself to replace it that afternoon.
99.9% of the tire looked perfect. Anyhow I guess I got lucky cause I ran it down to the wear bars. Oh, it was not on a Goldwing either.
This was back in the early '80's before I had ever owned a Goldwing. :)
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Re: Screw in the tire

Postby jbro08 » Fri Apr 01, 2016 5:32 pm

Stu_O I agree with you 100%. During the spring, summer & fall I ride mostly two up with the wife on board, winter its only me. On a trip to Gettysburg, PA. my new to me 2008 Wing had a lost 90 degree valve keeper (didn't even realize it) for the front tire and the rubber seal that meets the wheels started to crack and separate causing a leak because of it flexing due to centrifugal force. No tire damage but I couldn't do a temp repair so had to get towed to get a all metal 90 degree valve to replace the rubber based one, so no more keeper needed. However, we did get piece of glass in the rear once that created such a gash that it needed two mushroom plugs side by side to hold pressure. We were riding with friends that day so I got my wife to ride on the back of a friends bike and the temp repair got me 100 miles to home Ok...but that tire got changed real fast. Once the tire started getting hot and the pressure built up inside, it started to leak again. When I checked it the next morning to remove it to get a new tire, it was flat again. When on two wheels only, your tires and their condition are so important to both a safe and enjoyable experience, so I got a TPMS for my Wing and I can check both tire pressure and temperature at a glance now and if a pressure gets below my set point it gives me a warning, same for high temps too. IMO these systems should be standard on all heavy type over the road cruisers and touring bikes, especially the expensive ones. My patch kit is always there for a temp repair, but for me and my passenger, whether it be my wife, kids, granddaughter or friend...the tire gets replaced because you CAN replace a tire, you CAN'T replace yourself or a loved one. Safe riding to all RWP!

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Re: Screw in the tire

Postby maintainer » Fri Apr 01, 2016 6:09 pm

Stu_O wrote:To Each His Own is a good way to approach life, not abusing others for their opinions or forcing ours down others' throats. But I think it's also important for us to continue to hear and consider the opinions of others, rather than rejecting out-of-hand information that conflicts with our decisions. You never know - you might see or hear something that would change your mind and maybe even save your bacon. Here's my enlightening experience from way back when that changed my mind about motorcycle tire repairs.

Previous to owning a Gold Wing, I'd been riding 4-cylinder, air cooled UJMs weighing around 550 pounds. Picking up a nail or screw always seemed to happen to a nearly new tire. Not to worry. Because I'd plugged plenty of car tires successfully, I had no issues with using a rope-style plug in a m/c tire and did so many times with not a single negative consequence. I considered these repairs permanent and often rode the tire till tread wear dictated replacement. Then came my first Wing, an '87 Aspencade. With only 600 miles on a fresh set of tires, I picked up a nail in the rear somewhere in Nowhere, Utah. Rubber cement, rope plugs, compressor...I was back on the road in minutes. I finished that trip and returned home with around 1,500 miles on the tires. The trip was ridden solo, on 2-lane rural roads, and at speeds mostly below 70 mph. Honda Hoot was coming up, and I had plenty of tire remaining for the expected 5,000 mile round trip, so off we went, 2-up and loaded to the hilt. I figure the bike weighed around 1,150 pounds, including cargo and people.

Whenever I'm on a repaired tire, I visually examine the repair at every gas stop and check the pressure each morning, especially when on a trip. This trip was no different. We were heading from Phoenix to Asheville, N.C. via Jacksonville, Fla. and stopped in Seguin, Texas for gas on the second day. Total trip mileage was about 1,000 at that point, all on the Slab at around 75 mph. Tire inspection at the previous fill-up showed no issues, so imagine my surprise 150 miles later in Seguin when I saw a large, deep, jagged-edged crater at the repair with the plug poking up from the center. It resembled a giant, tamperproof Torx head fastener. Soapy water showed it wasn't leaking, so we called it quits for the day and limped slowly to a local motel, where I dismounted the wheel and a local GWRRA member drove me to the local Honda shop for a fresh tire. What did I learn? I learned the fact that just because a particular practice hasn't created problems yet isn't proof that it can't or won't. I learned that unlike tires on 4-wheelers, motorcycle tire treads face constantly changing directional forces that can damage a plug and the rubber surrounding it. I learned that unlike a lighter bike or one ridden with less load and at lower speed, a Wing's rear tire on a heavily loaded bike and at higher speeds can get hot enough to burn your hand, even with correct inflation pressure. Finally, I learned that when tire makers say to use a repaired tire as if it were one load rating and one speed rating down from what's on the sidewall, that advice should be heeded. I'd ignored it. The carcass of a tire with a plugged hole is compromised structurally. And while a plug may allow the tire to hold pressure, the structural integrity is not restored. Take what you will (or won't) from this story, but it certainly changed my mind about considering a repaired m/c tire as safe to use normally till it's worn out.

Stu O


Oh I read and listened to other opinion's including yours.
I just don't happen to agree, got to go with my experience for the time being.
One thing about forums,
you find a lot of diversity.
Almost everyone is convinced of their own opinion as am I.
1982 GL 1100 Interstate SOLD
1977 GL 1000 Standard (naked can be good, who knew?)

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chouston99
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Re: Screw in the tire

Postby chouston99 » Fri Apr 01, 2016 7:41 pm

My question is can you (should you) plug a tire while running them with balance beads? Then replace said tire at the earliest chance you get.
[img]

[/img]

paulgugs
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Re: Screw in the tire

Postby paulgugs » Fri Apr 01, 2016 8:05 pm

I had a screw in my rear tire, 1986 wing, i got the tire off in a couple of hours. Well when i went to reinstall if, let just say i finished getting her back together 8 months later. I should of taken pics of all the trim and trunks before i started. Rides nice now.

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Re: Screw in the tire

Postby OldZX11Rider » Sat Apr 02, 2016 9:11 am

Eight months! :shock:

I'm thinking once you pulled the boot and bags and rear tire, you also had to replace the fuel tank or rebuild the rear frame or replace the frame. Something like that. :idea:

That or you found rattlesnakes crawling around in there. :D
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Re: Screw in the tire

Postby paulgugs » Sat Apr 02, 2016 3:13 pm

No snakes, lots of frustration, I have two 86's so i rode the other till winter, once I got going putting it back together again, it took all day and i only had to disassemble it once, not fun figuring out where all the trim lights bolts and more bolts.
I will say goldwings are a great ride.

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Re: Screw in the tire

Postby OldZX11Rider » Sat Apr 02, 2016 4:41 pm

At least you had a second one to look at to see how to put the first one back together. :lol:
In 8 months, half my nuts, bolts and screws would have been "borrowed" for other things. :roll:
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Re: Screw in the tire

Postby littlebeaver » Sat Apr 02, 2016 10:37 pm

Although it would probably be ok with a patch inside of it, I would break down and replace the tire with a new one,, Ouch, especially if the tire was on the newer side ... I just wouldn't want to be out and about and the patch fail is all... :lol:




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