Sta-Bil


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Solina Dave
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Sta-Bil

Postby Solina Dave » Tue Oct 27, 2015 10:31 pm



This has no-doubt been discussed so much that everybody's probably sick of it, but I'd like to know why some people are quite specific, that one should use marine grade Sta-Bil when storing their bike for the winter. I've always used the regular red Sta-Bil and the bike still runs, but if one is definitely better than the other then I'd use it. I always burn ethanol-free high test fuel for what it's worth.
If anyone thinks that they can justify the use of marine grade Sta-Bil in technical terms, I'd be interested. It just seems to me that someone simply saying, "Oh yes, you must always use the marine grade because it's far superior" just doesn't cut it. If it's so good, why is it so good?

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Re: Sta-Bil

Postby wingman12 » Tue Oct 27, 2015 11:22 pm

Grumpy Dave. I haven't ever used sta-ble ever in my wing. Only 2 oz seafoam per gallon of 10% ethanol gas for 16 years, 5 months winter hibernation. Never had a starting problem in the spring. Just saying, it works for me. To each his/her own. Happy hibernation to those of us that are so inclined. :D :D ps winter sucks :x :x

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Re: Sta-Bil

Postby dingdong » Wed Oct 28, 2015 7:53 am

From their website: http://www.goldeagle.com/brands/sta-bil-faqs

Looks like Their Fuel Stabilizer is for long term storage and the Marine is for every fill up to protect from the effects of E10 in engines. Kind of begs the question : Why do so many folks recommend Marine grade for winter storage. Another "I read it on the internet" situation, I suppose.

What is the difference between new STA-BIL® Ethanol Treatment, STA-BIL® Fuel Stabilizer, and Marine Formula STA-BIL®?

STA-BIL® Fuel Stabilizer is designed for use during STORAGE of any gasoline equipment or vehicle stored for 30 days or more, or used infrequently. It will keep gas fresh for 12 months, and help prevent corrosion, and gum and varnish formation. It is effective in all gasolines, including Ethanol blends, including E-85. Marine Formula STA-BIL® Ethanol Treatment was designed for use at every fill up for marine engines (boats, jetskis) to protect against the damaging effects experienced when using Ethanol blended fuels -- including corrosion caused by water attraction, and fuel system plugging caused by deposit loosening. New STA-BIL® Ethanol Treatment is designed for use at every fill up for all gasoline automotive and small engines for protection against these same problems.
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Re: Sta-Bil

Postby WingAdmin » Wed Oct 28, 2015 9:01 am

Both the regular (red) Sta-Bil Fuel Stabilizer as well as the marine (green) Sta-Bil will stabilize fuel and prevent phase separation of ethanol "enhanced" (laden) fuel. Marine Sta-Bil is better at phase separation prevention, as it is designed to be used in wet/moist environments. Both will stabilize fuel for up to 24 months.

Marine Sta-Bil has twice the corrosion prevention compound and four times the fuel system cleaner compound than regular Sta-Bil. Marine Sta-Bil also releases a vapor when poured in. This vapor coats the metal portions of the fuel tank that are not immersed in fuel, to prevent corrosion - regular Sta-Bil does not do this. I personally use the Marine Sta-Bil in all of my engines.

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Re: Sta-Bil

Postby Solina Dave » Wed Oct 28, 2015 10:02 am

WingAdmin wrote:Both the regular (red) Sta-Bil Fuel Stabilizer as well as the marine (green) Sta-Bil will stabilize fuel and prevent phase separation of ethanol "enhanced" (laden) fuel. Marine Sta-Bil is better at phase separation prevention, as it is designed to be used in wet/moist environments. Both will stabilize fuel for up to 24 months.

Marine Sta-Bil has twice the corrosion prevention compound and four times the fuel system cleaner compound than regular Sta-Bil. Marine Sta-Bil also releases a vapor when poured in. This vapor coats the metal portions of the fuel tank that are not immersed in fuel, to prevent corrosion - regular Sta-Bil does not do this. I personally use the Marine Sta-Bil in all of my engines.


Thanks for that. Based on what you're saying, the marine grade formula sounds almost too good to be true. This is the information that I'm interested in reviewing. Where did you get that information? I've already read through the Gold Eagle site's FAQ's, and there always seems to be a corporate bias, in it's filtered presentation, that tends to leave me skeptical. But then, that's just me I guess.

Thanks again....................Dave
Last edited by Solina Dave on Wed Oct 28, 2015 10:23 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Sta-Bil

Postby golden highway » Wed Oct 28, 2015 10:22 am

I use two stroke oil. It does it all at a lower cost. I have motors stored for five years treated with two stroke. Started right up. I use less then a 50 to 1 and no smoking. Also coats the tank and acts as an upper cylinder lubricant.

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Re: Sta-Bil

Postby Solina Dave » Wed Oct 28, 2015 10:29 am

golden highway wrote:I use two stroke oil. It does it all at a lower cost. I have motors stored for five years treated with two stroke. Started right up. I use less then a 50 to 1 and no smoking. Also coats the tank and acts as an upper cylinder lubricant.


That's interesting. What prompted you to go that route in the first place?
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Re: Sta-Bil

Postby golden highway » Wed Oct 28, 2015 10:47 am

I noticed that I never treated my two stoke motors and some were stored for years and they always started right up. I wouldn't change the gas I would just use it with no issues. I opened my old metal boat gas can to find the inside of the tank nice and shiny. I did some checking and found two stroke oil has a gas preservative in it. I found it won't hurt a four stoke motor and didn't foul the plugs as some suggested would happen. I decided to give it a try and it worked great. I think even better than the stabilizers. My 1200 used to have noisy lifters from time to time and after using the two stroke oil to winterize it the noise went away. I have been doing this for about 20 years with no issues. Might be longer

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Re: Sta-Bil

Postby Solina Dave » Wed Oct 28, 2015 11:12 am

golden highway wrote:I noticed that I never treated my two stoke motors and some were stored for years and they always started right up. I wouldn't change the gas I would just use it with no issues. I opened my old metal boat gas can to find the inside of the tank nice and shiny. I did some checking and found two stroke oil has a gas preservative in it. I found it won't hurt a four stoke motor and didn't foul the plugs as some suggested would happen. I decided to give it a try and it worked great. I think even better than the stabilizers. My 1200 used to have noisy lifters from time to time and after using the two stroke oil to winterize it the noise went away. I have been doing this for about 20 years with no issues. Might be longer


Good stuff! It seems like you've hit on something that definitely works for you. What you're saying seems to make sense, and it's interesting that there's a fuel preservative in the 2-stroke oil. I didn't know that. One thing still in question would be the advantage of the ethanol treatment in the STA-BIL formula, when used at each fill. Personally, I try to use ethanol-free fuel as much as possible, and I'm successful in that regard probably 95% of the time.
Anyway, thanks again for that insight into 2-stroke oil.............................Dave

PS.......How's your Kentucky weather, and how long is winter down there?
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Re: Sta-Bil

Postby golden highway » Wed Oct 28, 2015 12:45 pm

I found several people on another site use this also.

Weather in Kentucky can very a lot. Most of the time my bike sits about two months give or take in the winter. I ride down to the mid 40's

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Re: Sta-Bil

Postby Solina Dave » Wed Oct 28, 2015 4:22 pm

golden highway wrote:I found several people on another site use this also.

Weather in Kentucky can very a lot. Most of the time my bike sits about two months give or take in the winter. I ride down to the mid 40's


Two months, that's good. I've usually got it packed away early in November, and out again mid-March, early April, so about 5 months. I also don't have a problem riding if it's cool. After all, people ride snowmobiles. Cool and sunny, with calm winds can be a beautiful ride, as long as there's no snow or ice of course,
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Re: Sta-Bil

Postby themainviking » Thu Oct 29, 2015 7:17 am

Gonna have a pretty good three or four days coming up, Dave, so don't treat your fuel yet.... burn it instead. :lol: I use Sta-Bil red and have for years, without problems. I did not know that 2 cycle oil had fuel stabilizing benefits, but have 100 to 1 mix here, so I am gonna check the manufacturer on this. It may be something to try. My bike is stored dry, so no problems with condensation, or I might have gone to Sta-Bil green. Also, I fill my tank to the very top.
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Re: Sta-Bil

Postby Solina Dave » Thu Oct 29, 2015 2:57 pm

As winter approaches, and I'm faced with a combination of good, but cool riding days, and days when it's plainly out of the question to get the bike out and go for that ride, I like to prepare for the inevitable. Just before I get home, I'll stop and fill 'er up with ethanol-free fuel of course, so that if the winter does finally, and obviously settle in, I can simply go out to my shed, add some stabilizer and run it for 5 minutes or so, remove the battery and my Corbin seat, and take them indoors for a battery tender and leather treatment, and wish my motorcycle a restful hibernation. Simple, but effective. Seems to work well.
It's been a great 6 or 7 months of good times this year. I find that I use the forum more, during the winter months. If I can't be out riding, it's nice to have friends in similar circumstances to rap with, about important stuff. People who love to ride, and who love their bike. It's kinda sad that there are those, who never have that experience.

That's what I think.....................................Dave
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Re: Sta-Bil

Postby redial » Thu Oct 29, 2015 9:15 pm

And what about us folks who have to :?: ride all year round? We never get some time to have a chat on forums, as we have to do it after a long day of riding :lol: As winter approaches for the Northerners, think of us riding to the beach, with a dozen oysters, and having a relaxing day swimming with the sharks :o , the stinging jellyfish, and the blue ring octopus to keep you awake for your ride home.
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Re: Sta-Bil

Postby wingman12 » Thu Oct 29, 2015 9:45 pm

And to think that only us riders in the upper northern hemisphere have it tough. I must those of you down under also have it rough in our winter. My hat off to you for induring such hardships. :lol: :lol:

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Re: Sta-Bil

Postby Solina Dave » Sun Nov 15, 2015 11:51 am

Another question.
Gold Eagle's FAQs, regarding the Sta-Bil fuel additive, states the dosage to be 1 oz. for every 2 1/2 gallons of fuel. I just purchased a bottle of marine grade Sta-Bil, and it states that 1 oz. will treat up to 10 gallons of fuel. Which is it? Those statements somehow seem very ambiguous, and obviously suggest applying dramatically different amounts of additive.
I've got a 5 gallon tank, and I understand that an overdose isn't a serious problem, but surely there has to be a limit. Do I add 1/2 oz. or 2 oz., or do I just upend the bottle and hope for the best?

I wouldn't want to overdose............................Dave
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Re: Sta-Bil

Postby Happytrails » Wed Nov 18, 2015 2:53 pm

WingAdmin wrote:Both the regular (red) Sta-Bil Fuel Stabilizer as well as the marine (green) Sta-Bil will stabilize fuel and prevent phase separation of ethanol "enhanced" (laden) fuel. Marine Sta-Bil is better at phase separation prevention, as it is designed to be used in wet/moist environments. Both will stabilize fuel for up to 24 months.

Marine Sta-Bil has twice the corrosion prevention compound and four times the fuel system cleaner compound than regular Sta-Bil. Marine Sta-Bil also releases a vapor when poured in. This vapor coats the metal portions of the fuel tank that are not immersed in fuel, to prevent corrosion - regular Sta-Bil does not do this. I personally use the Marine Sta-Bil in all of my engines.


Thanks for clearing that up. I was reading the bottles at Wallyworld and still couldn't find differences I was interested in. I've started using both Stabil and Seafoam during winter months. Maybe thats overkill.
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Re: Sta-Bil

Postby millerized » Tue Dec 01, 2015 8:53 am

Might just be internet legend with vehicles, but I've had bad experience with 2-stroke treated gasoline and catalytic converters in a Chevy Tracker. The only difference in the fuel used was the 2 stroke oil at 50:1, same can, different days; Monday was regular gas poured into the Tracker tank from the can, 2 stroke added Wednesday for a saw, and into the Tracker Thursday. I ended up along the road with a completely clogged cat to the point it wouldn't start. (rebar fixed 'that' cat)

Now you might not have a cat on the older bikes, but if you've got one on yours, you might be buying a new one if you use 2 stroke treated gas.
Unless you use quality 2 stroke oil with the right ratings and specs for use on motorcycles:
JASO-MA2 – This specification was introduced in 2006 for modern motorcycle engines. As well as being a higher standard of oil the JASO-MA2 approval means the oil is suitable for use in bikes with catalytic converts in the exhaust system.

Otherwise, you're ashing and clogging up a cat. And we all know how expensive motorcycle exhaust systems can be.

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Re: Sta-Bil

Postby timg2013 » Tue Dec 01, 2015 10:19 pm

as any one who has used sta-bil for storage knows when its start up time its also smoke time till you run out a tank full of fuel. I started using a product called STAR TRON WWW.STARBRITE.COM this product lasts up to 2 years and no smoking and longer storage time .Check out the web site for other info.
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Re: Sta-Bil

Postby Ghostman » Wed Dec 02, 2015 8:40 am

I use a TC3W rated two stroke oil in my lawn and snowblowers and occasionally toss a couple ounces in the wing. TC3W is ashless and wont clog catalytic converters. In the wing it seems to help keep things clean and run just a hair better. Heres a rating system for 2-stroke oils.

http://www.oilspecifications.org/api_2t.php

API API Two-Cycle Motor Oil Specifications
Spec Status Description
TA Obsolete Proposed classification for two-stroke engine oils required for extremely-small engines, typically less than 50 cc. Engine Tests for this classification were under preparation when the Coordinating European Council (CEC) withdrew support for this category.
TB Obsolete Proposed classification for two-stroke engine oils required for the engines of motor-scooters and other highly-loaded small engines, typically between 50 and 200 cc. The test sponsor no longer requires this category, and the classification has been abandoned.
TC Current Designed for various high-performance engines, typically between 200 and 500 cc, such as those on motorcycles and snowmobiles, and chain saws with high fuel-oil ratios - but not outboards. Two-cycle engine oils designed for API Classification TC address ring-sticking, pre-ignition and cylinder scuffing problems.
TD Obsolete Designed for water-cooled outboard engines, this classification used the identical engine test to that in the National Marine Manufacturers association (NMMA) TC-W category. API TD has been superseded, and is no longer accepted by the NMMA, who now recommend oils meeting the requirements of TC-W3 for water-cooled outboard engines.

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Re: Sta-Bil

Postby captaindan » Wed Dec 02, 2015 11:55 am

I too have been using the TC-W3 two stroke oil in many of my engines. I found a link on another cycle website a few years back that went into great detail about this and other additives. If a guy can find it, it's worth the read. Very informative with what appears to be factual results.




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