Ferry Crossing


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purchelli
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Ferry Crossing

Postby purchelli » Wed Dec 02, 2015 3:41 am



Hi all, I'm taking the bike across a notoriously rough patch of NZ ocean in Feb. I'll need to fasten the bike with straps for the crossing to anchor points provided on the ferry. I was thinking I could strap each side of the bike from the front crash bars but am now wondering if that's a good idea. Any feedback on this is appreciated.



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Re: Ferry Crossing

Postby WingAdmin » Wed Dec 02, 2015 9:53 am

purchelli wrote:Hi all, I'm taking the bike across a notoriously rough patch of NZ ocean in Feb. I'll need to fasten the bike with straps for the crossing to anchor points provided on the ferry. I was thinking I could strap each side of the bike from the front crash bars but am now wondering if that's a good idea. Any feedback on this is appreciated.


The crash bars are really not designed for that kind of load. The best thing you could do would be to pull your side covers off and strap it directly to the frame, near the center of the bike. The frame is thick and strong there, and you couldn't possibly do damage with hard wave hits like you could with the crash bars.

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Re: Ferry Crossing

Postby H20loo » Wed Dec 02, 2015 10:19 am

Take your own straps. Any ferry I have been on provides dirty greasy straps. Always interesting to watch the first timers throwing straps over seats gas tanks etc.

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Re: Ferry Crossing

Postby harvey01 » Wed Dec 02, 2015 10:46 am

Every ferry I have taken where the ferry has wanted the bike strapped down has handed me the straps and told me how they wanted it done or just did it themselves. Check your local laws but they assume responsibility and thus liability for your vehicle. Of course you could call the ferry company and see what they say.

We have a somewhat local ferry that nothing gets strapped down but the water has always been calm. They do want the bike on the sidestand. I rode one in Nova Scotia a couple years ago that was really tossing and they also did not tie anything down.

Check with the ferry company---they may not even allow you to use your straps unless theirs are attached first.
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purchelli
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Re: Ferry Crossing

Postby purchelli » Wed Dec 09, 2015 6:31 am

harvey01 wrote:Every ferry I have taken where the ferry has wanted the bike strapped down has handed me the straps and told me how they wanted it done or just did it themselves. Check your local laws but they assume responsibility and thus liability for your vehicle. Of course you could call the ferry company and see what they say.

We have a somewhat local ferry that nothing gets strapped down but the water has always been calm. They do want the bike on the sidestand. I rode one in Nova Scotia a couple years ago that was really tossing and they also did not tie anything down.

Check with the ferry company---they may not even allow you to use your straps unless theirs are attached first.


Thanks for the reply. I am required to secure the bike for the crossing. I'm just trying to understand the best way to secure the bike with my straps.

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Re: Ferry Crossing

Postby purchelli » Wed Dec 09, 2015 6:32 am

H20loo wrote:Take your own straps. Any ferry I have been on provides dirty greasy straps. Always interesting to watch the first timers throwing straps over seats gas tanks etc.


Yep, will take my own straps

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Re: Ferry Crossing

Postby purchelli » Wed Dec 09, 2015 6:34 am

H20loo wrote:Take your own straps. Any ferry I have been on provides dirty greasy straps. Always interesting to watch the first timers throwing straps over seats gas tanks etc.


Yep, taking my own straps

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Re: Ferry Crossing

Postby purchelli » Wed Dec 09, 2015 7:03 am

WingAdmin wrote:
purchelli wrote:Hi all, I'm taking the bike across a notoriously rough patch of NZ ocean in Feb. I'll need to fasten the bike with straps for the crossing to anchor points provided on the ferry. I was thinking I could strap each side of the bike from the front crash bars but am now wondering if that's a good idea. Any feedback on this is appreciated.


The crash bars are really not designed for that kind of load. The best thing you could do would be to pull your side covers off and strap it directly to the frame, near the center of the bike. The frame is thick and strong there, and you couldn't possibly do damage with hard wave hits like you could with the crash bars.


Ok thanks Admin. I went to one of the local Honda dealerships today and was pointed towards some purpose built straps that seem to somehow support the bike from the bars but not just the bars, I mean the actual handles. I couldn't figure out how it all worked and the assistant was about as helpful as a naked flame at a gas station. When I get a bit more time I'll look into it further. It seems the main issue is that the bike should be supported to points on the bike that are of a reasonable height. The crash bars are plenty strong but are positioned too low.

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Re: Ferry Crossing

Postby WingAdmin » Wed Dec 09, 2015 9:16 am

purchelli wrote:[quote="WingAdmin"The crash bars are really not designed for that kind of load. The best thing you could do would be to pull your side covers off and strap it directly to the frame, near the center of the bike. The frame is thick and strong there, and you couldn't possibly do damage with hard wave hits like you could with the crash bars.


Ok thanks Admin. I went to one of the local Honda dealerships today and was pointed towards some purpose built straps that seem to somehow support the bike from the bars but not just the bars, I mean the actual handles. I couldn't figure out how it all worked and the assistant was about as helpful as a naked flame at a gas station. When I get a bit more time I'll look into it further. It seems the main issue is that the bike should be supported to points on the bike that are of a reasonable height. The crash bars are plenty strong but are positioned too low.[/quote]

The handlebars have even less strength than the crash bars! They are easily bent, and they are so long that it is easy to apply a great deal of leverage at the steering stem.

You're correct in that the higher up on the bike you can secure it, the better you will keep it from moving laterally - you're basically making a right-angle triangle, and you want the remaining two angles in the triangle to be as equal as possible:

Bike strapped down
Bike strapped down


If the strapdown point on the bike is too low, the triangle is too narrow, and the bike will not be adequately supported. Similarly, if the strapdown point on the ground is too close to the bike, the triangle is again too narrow, and the bike will not be adequately supported. Ideally, the height from the ground to the strapdown point on the bike will be the same as the distance from the bike to the strapdown point on the ground.

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Re: Ferry Crossing

Postby purchelli » Thu Dec 10, 2015 5:54 am

Yep thanks Admin but I'm still trying to decide on where the anchor points on the bike are.

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Re: Ferry Crossing

Postby H20loo » Thu Dec 10, 2015 9:41 am

Moblie app doesnt show what bike you have. 2000 and earlier you will put soft straps around triple tree and pull 45 degrees down. Additional straps can attach to passenger handles.
Lots of good advice on trailering bikes in this forum that will help you secure your bike.

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Re: Ferry Crossing

Postby Mh434 » Fri Dec 11, 2015 11:34 pm

Having had to recently lift my bike with a cherry picker (it was upside down - don't ask!), I'll echo WingAdmin's advice re: attaching to the frame. If you take the plastic side covers off (this takes just seconds), you'll see big sections of the bike's main frame you can anchor to. These parts are immensely strong, and if you're careful with the strap hooks, you won't damage paint, wiring, or anything else. I'm sure those frame sections will support many times the weight of the bike without deforming.

I'd suggest doing a dry run at home with your new straps, so you're familiar with it all before boarding the ferry.

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Re: Ferry Crossing

Postby brettchallenger » Sat Dec 12, 2015 7:35 pm

I have lost count how many ferry journeys I have made with a motorcycle - suffice to say a lot. However, I have never done one with my Goldwing, the Tunnel is the easiest option now. That said, when I have used ferries, I always used the frame to tie the bike to the hull/bulkhead, I was never organised enough to bring my own ties and had to rely upon the greasy ropes provided by the deck hands. I don't know how big the ferry is you are going to use, in the UK, on the longer crossings, the ships are huge, over 200 metres in length and 65,000 tons, so they don't get thrown around that often, also they have dedicated bike bays. But the smaller ones can get quite unsettled in rough weather. I always manoeuvred the bike so that I could use the sidestand with the bike leaning into the bulkhead, this way the weight is on the wheels not the centre stand, and the ropes, fastened to the frame are pulling the bike into the hull/bulkhead. However, the biggest bike I took on a ferry crossing with was BMW R80RT, a relative lightweight compared to a 'Wing. Frankly, I doubt if you will have the luxury of being able to position a Goldwing as you would ideally wish, it is just too big and cumbersome. Moreover, there might not be much space for you to work in, if your ferry is like the ones we have, there will be a car or truck next to you, and even throwing your leg over the bike might be restricted. So my advice is: use the sidestand, tie the machine (as pointed out by WingAdmin) by the frame, be organised and bring your own ties/ropes/cushions, and practice before you leave so you know the most accessible bit of frame you will be able to get a tie round. Oh, and lastly, avoid if you can, parking next to a truck load of incontinent cattle - not an experience I want to repeat.

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Re: Ferry Crossing

Postby purchelli » Mon Dec 14, 2015 6:56 am

thanks so much all. Noted and stored. Awesome forum !!!

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Re: Ferry Crossing

Postby purchelli » Wed Dec 16, 2015 2:15 am

H20loo wrote:Moblie app doesnt show what bike you have. 2000 and earlier you will put soft straps around triple tree and pull 45 degrees down. Additional straps can attach to passenger handles.
Lots of good advice on trailering bikes in this forum that will help you secure your bike.


Mine is a 2000. Thanks for the reply

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Re: Ferry Crossing

Postby purchelli » Wed Dec 16, 2015 2:21 am

brettchallenger wrote:I have lost count how many ferry journeys I have made with a motorcycle - suffice to say a lot. However, I have never done one with my Goldwing, the Tunnel is the easiest option now. That said, when I have used ferries, I always used the frame to tie the bike to the hull/bulkhead, I was never organised enough to bring my own ties and had to rely upon the greasy ropes provided by the deck hands. I don't know how big the ferry is you are going to use, in the UK, on the longer crossings, the ships are huge, over 200 metres in length and 65,000 tons, so they don't get thrown around that often, also they have dedicated bike bays. But the smaller ones can get quite unsettled in rough weather. I always manoeuvred the bike so that I could use the sidestand with the bike leaning into the bulkhead, this way the weight is on the wheels not the centre stand, and the ropes, fastened to the frame are pulling the bike into the hull/bulkhead. However, the biggest bike I took on a ferry crossing with was BMW R80RT, a relative lightweight compared to a 'Wing. Frankly, I doubt if you will have the luxury of being able to position a Goldwing as you would ideally wish, it is just too big and cumbersome. Moreover, there might not be much space for you to work in, if your ferry is like the ones we have, there will be a car or truck next to you, and even throwing your leg over the bike might be restricted. So my advice is: use the sidestand, tie the machine (as pointed out by WingAdmin) by the frame, be organised and bring your own ties/ropes/cushions, and practice before you leave so you know the most accessible bit of frame you will be able to get a tie round. Oh, and lastly, avoid if you can, parking next to a truck load of incontinent cattle - not an experience I want to repeat.

Good luck


thanks brettchallenger. noted !!

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Re: Ferry Crossing

Postby Troubled1 » Fri Jan 01, 2016 6:35 pm

Back in '07, I caught the ferry from Bar Harbor ME to Yarmouth NS, I guess the Cat Ferry doesn't run from there anymore.
But, with all my planning for this adventure I forgot to think about strapping down my 06 Goldwing..
They provided some greasy straps, and now what? there were several of us in the same predicament,
I ended up fastening them to the crash bars and to "slots" in the deck..
The ferry ride was unnerving, because the choppiness of the water, but once allowed back down below
3hrs later, the bike was safe and sound..
But as I plan to take the ferry from Sidney NS to Newfoundland, it's time to think about that again,
and plan better, probably buy some in Maine and then leave then on the ferry when I get back off in Sidney

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Re: Ferry Crossing

Postby john3xv1 » Fri Jan 01, 2016 10:28 pm

Have sheared bolts off rear guard tying off there. As said in other posts, remove side covers and run straps around frame: 2 pulling forward and out, 2 pulling back and out. Straps should form an X if looking from overhead.

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Re: Ferry Crossing

Postby john3xv1 » Sat Jan 02, 2016 12:34 am

john3xv1 wrote:Have sheared bolts off rear guard tying off there. As said in other posts, remove side covers and run straps around frame: 2 pulling forward and out, 2 pulling back and out. Straps should form an X if looking from overhead.

Also, once strapped, put in neutral to avoid pressure on gears.

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Re: Ferry Crossing

Postby aussiegold » Sat Jan 02, 2016 1:09 am

i recently went to Tasmania from Melbourne on the overnight ferry. the stevedores on board secure all vehicles. my instructions were " first gear, sidestand please. "
as i stood and watched him strapping it down , he just looked at me sideways and said, " she'll be right mate, i do thousands of these " he was right. i trusted him and went up to the bar.
:D

here tis'

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Re: Ferry Crossing

Postby purchelli » Sat Jan 02, 2016 1:46 am

cheers Aussiegold, thanks for the advice

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Re: Ferry Crossing

Postby purchelli » Sat Jan 02, 2016 1:48 am

cheers John, thanks for the reply

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Re: Ferry Crossing

Postby brettchallenger » Sat Jan 02, 2016 5:43 am

This should put you in the mood for a nice sea crossing.



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Re: Ferry Crossing

Postby FM-USA » Sat Jan 02, 2016 6:28 pm

If they insist on there straps, that's fine.
When they're done you put your straps on also.

Only other questions are, side stand or center stand, and in or out of gear?
Pressure on the gears during a short voyage is much less than riding.
So I say in gear. 1st, 2nd or 3rd? (ALWAYS more questions :roll: )

I think on the side stand if you can get your front tire against something solid then strap it down.
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Re: Ferry Crossing

Postby WingAdmin » Sat Jan 02, 2016 8:38 pm

If there is any chance that there will be impact to absorb (i.e. on a ferry, on a trailer), NEVER use the center stand. It is not designed to handle impacts of even everyday road bumps, and will deform or even break its mounts or the bike frame. The bike must be on its wheels, in order to absorb the bumps and impacts with its suspension. That means side stand only.




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