helmet cams - safe


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brettchallenger
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helmet cams - safe

Postby brettchallenger » Tue Jan 26, 2016 6:10 pm



There was some discussion about the safety of helmet cams a while back, it was suggested that one of the contributory factors to the serious injuries sustained by Formula One driver, Michael Schumacher in his skiing accident, might have been his helmet cam.

Recent research has shown that helmet cams are unlikely to cause a motorcycle helmet to fail. You can read it here:- http://www.sumpmagazine.com/motorcycle- ... fe-ish.htm


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Big Blue UK
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Re: helmet cams - safe

Postby Big Blue UK » Wed Jan 27, 2016 6:40 am

I am a Schumacher fan, and no one wishes him well more than me. I Watched him walk away from some serious spills in a car and on a bike. The reason he did not walk away from his ski accident, was because he had a piss pot on his head. There are no doubt many reasons why, but the fact remains, sad but....
If at first you don't succeed, hide the evidence.

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Re: helmet cams - safe

Postby WingAdmin » Wed Jan 27, 2016 3:24 pm

Helmets are designed to extend the amount of time a shock is imparted to your head; and from there to your brain. An instantaneous impact on the helmet shell may be hundreds of G's, which could cause instant death (or crush your skull). The shell comes to a sudden stop when it hits something (actually it deforms a bit, but for this argument let's just say it stops instantly), and your head continues to move. The EPS layer inside the shell begins to crush, absorbing the impact. It distributes the impact over a wider area, and over a longer amount of time. The time is what is really important - instead of an impact of x joules spread over 0.01 second, it is spread over say 0.1 second - an order of magnitude longer. This reduces the instantaneous G's considerably, reducing the shock delivered to your brain.

What helmets are really poor at doing is protecting against rotational injury. When your head is suddenly rotated, your brain (which is just floating in fluid inside your skull) lags behind. Blood vessels and nerves which attach your brain to your body are wrenched, and can cause serious brain bleeds or even instant death. Helmets attempt to mitigate this by being smooth and slippery, so that they slide along the ground without suddenly catching on something and rotating. This is why little vents and protrusions on the helmet are typically attached with glue instead of being built into the shell - so that they will easily shear off on impact and not cause the helmet to rotate. There are actually some new helmets being developed and tested that have slippery layers of impact absorbing material inside. When the helmet suddenly rotates, the inner layers slide against one another, reducing this rotational force and spreading it out over time, to reduce the potential for rotational brain injury.

Now think about sticking a camera on your helmet. You don't want to lose your expensive camera, so you fasten it quite securely. What you have just created is a lever, which hits the ground and wrenches the helmet suddenly around, causing rotational brain injury.

Thanks, but I'll leave the camera fastened to my bike, and reserve my helmet for protecting my head.

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Re: helmet cams - safe

Postby Breakdancer » Thu Jan 28, 2016 9:19 am

Thanks Scott !! This is potentially life saving information. Never thought of this from this view point, and it all makes sense. I for one thank you for sharing your wealth of knowledge with all of us,(and all you other guys as well). Also for making me a safer rider. ;)

I just received my maintenance manual yesterday. Let the fun begin!!!
Blue Skies...Scott ;
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brettchallenger
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Re: helmet cams - safe

Postby brettchallenger » Fri Jan 29, 2016 4:51 am

Thanks, but I'll leave the camera fastened to my bike, and reserve my helmet for protecting my head.



Whilst I feel the points made by WingAdmin have some validity, I am still not convinced that adding a helmet cam is as dangerous a modification as described. Having looked, albeit quite briefly, at the various helmet camera mounts available, it seems that most are attached using a system of straps, or are fixed using an adhesive pad. I am not sure that either of these methods would add significant leverage as described by WingAdmin, before they would simply shear off or otherwise become detached. If the camera mount was attached using screws then this would be a different matter, it would also bring into question whether the screw holes themselves would diminish the helmet's strength.

However, the original post which raised this issue, in reference to Michael Schumacher's unfortunate skiing accident, was that the camera would create a point on the helmet through which much larger forces would be applied in the event of a collision, thus weakening the helmet's integrity; rather than rotational forces placed on the helmet leading to injury.

Personally, this is all somewhat academic to me as I don't have a camera to attach on me or my motorcycle, but it is an interesting argument.


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Follow your spirit: and upon this charge,
Cry — God for Harry! England and Saint George!


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