pushed over


Anything goes - doesn't fit any other category!
  • Sponsored Links
User avatar
hap2
Posts: 573
Joined: Tue Sep 29, 2009 9:00 pm
Location: Calgary, Alberta
Motorcycle: 1992 GoldWing 1500SE

pushed over

Postby hap2 » Sat Aug 06, 2016 1:18 pm



Somebody pushed my bike over during the night. Tell me: Why wold someone do something like that? What a jerk. I pulled a back muscle trying to lift it back up up so I phoned a guy from the local GWWRA chapter & he came & helped me (alot) getting it upright. I noticed that now a piece of trim (the long narrow piece that contours the left part of the bike (I can send u a pic if u want) is now missing. Any idea where I can get a used one?

I'd get an alarm, but that would wake up the whole neighborhood. Maybe I can getta silent electrical alarm, so that if anyone even touched the bike, they would get a shock. I have to idea where to get one of those or how to hook it up if it it's even legal.

I'd like to get someone to make a tall stand (3 or 4 pieces to assemble) with a ratchet so that I could just ratchet it up if it even happens again.

How do u protect your bike's from a-holes that do that anyway?

I appreciate the feedback.



User avatar
Monsignore
Posts: 50
Joined: Fri Jul 08, 2016 5:39 pm
Location: Astoria, NY
Motorcycle: '83 GL1100 w/ CSC Friendship I sidecar, '05 R1200GS

Re: pushed over

Postby Monsignore » Sat Aug 06, 2016 8:22 pm

That sucks.

The same thing happened to my beloved R1200GS a month after I brought it home. I've since learned it's a right of passage owning a motorcycle in NYC.

**** come in all colors, shapes, sizes, orientations, etc.

You can either hook up alarms, cameras, motion-activated Phalanx gatling guns, and wear down your worry beads to dust about it happening again, or you can use it as a meditation point on the human condition. What motivates an individual to lash out against another human's personal property? How would the perpetrator react if similar circumstances befell them? Do the scratches and dents add character, or detract from resale value, and which is more valuable to you as an individual?

When I first brought home my '83 GL110I sidecar rig, I got pissed when I saw teenagers taking photos of each other sitting in the tub, but then I thought back to when I was a teenager, and remembered I live in NYC. Sh!t happens. We can clench our teeth and scream at clouds, or we can accept, process and learn from the experience.

User avatar
robb
Posts: 1040
Joined: Mon Jul 19, 2010 7:46 pm
Location: Lexington, North Carolina
Motorcycle: 1989 Honda GL1500 Aspencade

Re: pushed over

Postby robb » Sat Aug 06, 2016 9:25 pm

You don't have to push over a Wing, it will do it all by itself. If it's aiming downhill place in gear first allowing transmission to hold then put out kickstand or it will surely unload stand and fall. If on stand with 20 or less psi in shock it is setting upright and can fall over with a 2-3 mph breeze.
Only time mine ever fell over was in driveway, got off to take package from mailman and the wind blew it over. No damage and would not have believed if not for seeing it happen.

User avatar
hap2
Posts: 573
Joined: Tue Sep 29, 2009 9:00 pm
Location: Calgary, Alberta
Motorcycle: 1992 GoldWing 1500SE

Re: pushed over

Postby hap2 » Sat Aug 06, 2016 9:36 pm

First time it's happened in 30 yrs since I started riding bikes,so I guess that's not bad. I'm more peed about why someone wud do that & how low / uncaring / disrespectful some ppl are. I think it basically comes down to parents not disciplining, but that's just my 2 cents.

I know it wasn;t the wind, as I've parked that way for 5 yrs & it wasn't windy, the kickstand was down & it was leaning to the left & it was pushed to the right.

Just a-holes I wish I could have 5 min with them
.

User avatar
flyinrob
Posts: 56
Joined: Tue Dec 31, 2013 10:48 am
Location: Sacramento, California
Motorcycle: 1996 Gl1500 Aspencade

Re: pushed over

Postby flyinrob » Sat Aug 06, 2016 10:16 pm

Also there is a video on Youtube on how to raise a Goldwing. It's actually kinda easy and doesn't involve your back. Basically you plant your butt against the seat and use your legs to push upright the bike. I have done it and it works.

Rob

User avatar
hap2
Posts: 573
Joined: Tue Sep 29, 2009 9:00 pm
Location: Calgary, Alberta
Motorcycle: 1992 GoldWing 1500SE

Re: pushed over

Postby hap2 » Sat Aug 06, 2016 11:04 pm

I've seen those videos & it does look easy. I need someone to be with me & walk me thru how to do it right. My back still hurts & that was 12 hrs ago. O well.

BTW, there's something on my lexin windshield that even Pledge won't remove. Trying to figure out what it is & what'll get rid of it. Little patches of something.

User avatar
dingdong
Posts: 2863
Joined: Thu Apr 08, 2010 8:35 am
Location: Oklahoma City
Motorcycle: 1976 gl1000
1993 gl1500
2004 NRX1800 Rune

Re: pushed over

Postby dingdong » Sun Aug 07, 2016 7:37 am

Sorry to hear about you being such a pushover. ;) Don't even think of installing a shock type alarm. Not legal and you will get sued. What narrow strip are you referring to? I see chrome kick plates on the side panels. Is that it? If so they are known for coming loose with age. Aftermarket item. You might want to check the others. That ratchet lift looks like a handy item however kind of pricey.
Tom

A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.

User avatar
hap2
Posts: 573
Joined: Tue Sep 29, 2009 9:00 pm
Location: Calgary, Alberta
Motorcycle: 1992 GoldWing 1500SE

Re: pushed over

Postby hap2 » Sun Aug 07, 2016 7:58 am

The narrow strip I find out is the upper fairing moulding trim. I just need it for the left side.

User avatar
dtrider
Posts: 185
Joined: Tue Sep 23, 2014 12:44 am
Location: Meridian, Id
Motorcycle: 2012 GL1800

Re: pushed over

Postby dtrider » Sun Aug 07, 2016 8:43 am

My bike went over last month when I failed to notice the slope in the driveway at a gas station. Once it settled the bike was laying on its side with the top slightly downhill. I'm pretty sure I heard a couple cowboys start to chuckle, until I used the technique that Rob mentioned to lift it back up by myself. It's actually pretty simple to do, but it looks dammed impressive when an old guy just squats and stands up an upside down 900 lb bike.

You don't really need to wait for somebody to walk you through it. Maybe get somebody to help you lay it down, then just plant your butt on the seat, grab the handle bar and the passenger grip, and lift with your legs. You'll be amazed at how easy it is.

Maybe if the punks that tipped it over saw you lift it back up by yourself they would think twice about doing it again.

/dwight
Every day is a good day for a bike ride. Some days are just better than others.
Image

User avatar
minimac
Posts: 330
Joined: Mon Aug 06, 2012 9:25 am
Location: Oswego, NY
Motorcycle: 1993 GL1500 Aspencade
2006 Burgman Executive
2007 Yamaha Majesty
2006 Yamaha Morphous-(2018 cannonball scoot)

Re: pushed over

Postby minimac » Sun Aug 07, 2016 8:48 am

A small set of easily attached "training wheels" that could be quickly bolted and removed to the engine crash bars will prevent the bike from being tipped over when your not around.

User avatar
Breakdancer
Posts: 154
Joined: Tue May 15, 2012 7:19 pm
Location: Bevent, Wisconsin
Motorcycle: 1993 gl1500 Aspencade

Re: pushed over

Postby Breakdancer » Sun Aug 07, 2016 9:14 am

Maybe a wheel chock like one from Harbor Freight. You would have to find a way to anchor it down outside (maybe a piece of steel plate or a sheet of treated plywood?). You could even put a cable lock around your front tire so nobody could even back it off.

Monsignore.. nice way to keep things in perspective. ;)
Blue Skies...Scott ;
PGR

User avatar
hap2
Posts: 573
Joined: Tue Sep 29, 2009 9:00 pm
Location: Calgary, Alberta
Motorcycle: 1992 GoldWing 1500SE

Re: pushed over

Postby hap2 » Sun Aug 07, 2016 11:17 am

minimac: that's a good idea I never even thot of. Thank you

Breakdancer: Sounds like a good idea too, but'd I have to see a pic of what u mean

All your stories & suggestions encourage me, so thanks alot again for them.

User avatar
hap2
Posts: 573
Joined: Tue Sep 29, 2009 9:00 pm
Location: Calgary, Alberta
Motorcycle: 1992 GoldWing 1500SE

Re: pushed over

Postby hap2 » Sun Aug 07, 2016 11:41 am

Training wheels:




User avatar
robb
Posts: 1040
Joined: Mon Jul 19, 2010 7:46 pm
Location: Lexington, North Carolina
Motorcycle: 1989 Honda GL1500 Aspencade

Re: pushed over

Postby robb » Sun Aug 07, 2016 3:18 pm

That landing gear is about $3500.

http://www.landingear.com/models.php

User avatar
hap2
Posts: 573
Joined: Tue Sep 29, 2009 9:00 pm
Location: Calgary, Alberta
Motorcycle: 1992 GoldWing 1500SE

Re: pushed over

Postby hap2 » Sun Aug 07, 2016 4:21 pm

Ouch, but ok & thanx. Maybe I can just rig up some kind of small dolly axle to stick underneath it.

CrystalPistol
Posts: 261
Joined: Wed Mar 10, 2010 9:07 pm
Location: Shenandoah Valley of Virginia
Motorcycle: 1985 GL1200A
1997 GL1500SE Lehman Trike

Re: pushed over

Postby CrystalPistol » Sun Aug 07, 2016 7:22 pm

hap2 wrote:Somebody pushed my bike over during the night. Tell me: Why wold someone do something like that? What a jerk. I pulled a back muscle trying to lift it back up up so I phoned a guy from the local GWWRA chapter & he came & helped me (alot) getting it upright. I noticed that now a piece of trim (the long narrow piece that contours the left part of the bike (I can send u a pic if u want) is now missing. Any idea where I can get a used one?

... etc ...




You should not be hurting or straining your back. That trim piece is often seen on Ebay and then there are still some aftermarket offerings in chrome.

A number of years ago I wrote an article for my chapter's newsletter. It's the method to right a Gold Wing that I learned from my first Gold Book back in 1995 ..... which I used a few days later when my 1200 slipped out from under me on my wet grass coming around and up to the driveway from the basement. Last year at our annual fundraiser I saw a lady from the crowd use the same method to stand up a GL1800 as a demo, she was maybe 115-120 pounds.
CrystalPistol wrote:
The Gold Wing can be an intimidating bike to drop, we all know they weigh 700+ pounds, nearer 800 - 850 if the truth be known. It can happen that a foot slips on some gravel at an intersection in N.C. off the Parkway at a stop sign. It can happen when one slows to a stop, but is ready to move again before one puts his foot down and one lets the clutch out and gives some throttle to take off from a balanced position ... only to realize the bike is in neutral instead of first. It can happen in a lot of ways in just a moment. Once we know for a fact that we can, on our own, "right a downed Wing" it frees us up from those feelings of panic when we realize that it's going over.

The rider can usually "step" off the bike as it glides to earth (no use trying to stop 700+ pounds, just slow it's descent a bit maybe) and warn your co-rider (as if she doesn't know where it's going?). Now is a really good time to mention to our co-riders to keep their feet and legs tucked in, feet on passenger footboards or pegs, and just go with the bike, to NOT try and stop the bike or risk getting a leg caught or broken under the bike or saddlebags by trying to stop it. With all that in mind, I offer the following as a refresher of sorts, in the proper way to "Right your Wing". This information is also included in the GoldBook we get each year.

Method to right bike.

The GoldWing will generally lay only so far over, somewhere near 40-45 degrees thanks to low center of gravity & the protection bars.

1 a)
If on Right side down, turn motor off, put the transmission in 1st gear, and extend the side stand now (you will be on wrong side to do it later)
1 b) If on Left side down, turn motor off, put the transmission in 1st gear. (you cannot put the side stand down, but you will be able to in a moment)

2) Back up to bike placing your butt in seat, knees bent, you are facing from side of bike now.

3) With the hand nearest to rear of bike, grab lower passenger handhold.

4) With the hand nearest front of bike, grab lowest handlebar grip and pull up till fork is turned to the stop.

5) Now just backup, straightening legs, holding pass grab rail and lower grip, bike will set up easier than you ever imagined.
a) If you are on right side of bike, gently ease back till it sets on previously extended side stand.
b) If you are on left side of bike, use heel of right shoe to extend side stand while still holding bike up.

It may be beneficial to go out and practice a couple lifts in a controlled environment like your own back yard with someone(s) there to assist if need be, to gain confidence. If you have never righted a Wing, you are in for a surprise at how easy this is to do. Once you realize that you probably can do it alone, your biggest worry will suddenly be "how to diplomatically" decline the well intentioned but potentially damaging aid of any good Samaritans offering to help you right your Wing by grabbing the trunk rack.
Image

User avatar
hap2
Posts: 573
Joined: Tue Sep 29, 2009 9:00 pm
Location: Calgary, Alberta
Motorcycle: 1992 GoldWing 1500SE

Re: pushed over

Postby hap2 » Sun Aug 07, 2016 7:48 pm

Yes..thanx alot. I probly just need to get a couple of freinds to help me lay it down & then I can try to do it the right way. Come to think of it, bcuz it was tipped to the right, & I intentionally made sure it was in gear & the kickstand was down, I didn't have my butt even close to the seat, so that didn't help. It wudn't even budge 1/2", so I was definitly doing something wrong. I think I need to hire someone to walk me thru & give me lessons.

Thanx for all the info. Once I can round up 2 or 3 guys to help me lay it down, I will try to get it up. If a 110 lb lady can do it, I can

User avatar
robb
Posts: 1040
Joined: Mon Jul 19, 2010 7:46 pm
Location: Lexington, North Carolina
Motorcycle: 1989 Honda GL1500 Aspencade

Re: pushed over

Postby robb » Sun Aug 07, 2016 9:26 pm

I tried to lift bike backed up to seat but was not able to get high enough to upright, dang short legs. But being short it's easy to get it up. Bad is when it falls onto left side, no kick stand on right to keep from falling the other way.

User avatar
hap2
Posts: 573
Joined: Tue Sep 29, 2009 9:00 pm
Location: Calgary, Alberta
Motorcycle: 1992 GoldWing 1500SE

Re: pushed over

Postby hap2 » Sun Aug 07, 2016 9:37 pm

Hi Robb:
Ya, I guess I'll have to watch videos again. I wish there was a training school here to show me how, but all they have is little starter [200 cc] bikes for beginners. Maybe I'll contact GWWRA (as I just joined to see what they offer, if anything.

So, were u finally able to do it like they do on the videos?

User avatar
themainviking
Posts: 2579
Joined: Wed Sep 29, 2010 6:59 pm
Location: North Bay, Ontario, Canada
Motorcycle: 2009 GL1800 AD

Re: pushed over

Postby themainviking » Mon Aug 08, 2016 7:13 am

hap2 wrote:Hi Robb:
Ya, I guess I'll have to watch videos again. I wish there was a training school here to show me how, but all they have is little starter [200 cc] bikes for beginners. Maybe I'll contact GWWRA (as I just joined to see what they offer, if anything.

So, were u finally able to do it like they do on the videos?


I do this all the time. It is how I get the rear wheel off to change tires. I lay a large piece of cardboard down on the right side of the bike, covered with a movers blanket (from a moving truck or a UHaul), and then I tilt the bike to the right, and it falls over (with me controlling the fall). Using my legs, it is a simple matter to pick it back up. That is the key. Using your legs. If a person does not have enough strength in the legs (happens as we get older) then this may not work for you. So far, so good, for me.

Oh, and if someone does this to change a tire, and cannot quite get the wheel and tire out - there is another trick that I did not mention in the paragraph above... While the bike is on it's side, tip it further till you can get the center stand deployed. That will lift and hold the bike in a position whereas the rear wheel can be slid right out. Remember to return the center stand to its closed position prior to attempting to lift the bike. :lol:
It ain't about the destination - it's all about the journey

ImageImage

User avatar
The Bus Driver
Posts: 31
Joined: Tue Mar 24, 2015 9:25 am
Location: Port Charlotte,Florida
Motorcycle: 2013 Honda F6B

Re: pushed over

Postby The Bus Driver » Sat Aug 20, 2016 10:43 am

I had to pick my 1500 up in the driveway again this morning,it was very early,so no extra help around.I read about the back lift,so here was my opportunity to give it a try.I'm 62 so I've lost a lot of upper body strength over the years,but I just couldn't let it sit there. The bike had toppled over on to the side stand side,so I crouched down low with my butt against the seat.Grabbed the passenger handle,and the handlebar and backed up while I lifted,up it came,slowly at first.As I pushed back it was coming up,I was able to use my right foot to push the side stand out,but needed to get it just a little higher.Finally,it was up high enough to get the side stand out all the way...So this technique worked for me... maybe time for a Trike conversion.........NOT!!!!!

User avatar
hap2
Posts: 573
Joined: Tue Sep 29, 2009 9:00 pm
Location: Calgary, Alberta
Motorcycle: 1992 GoldWing 1500SE

Re: pushed over

Postby hap2 » Sat Aug 20, 2016 11:00 am

Congrats for being able to do that. I need u (or someone like u) to come here & give me lessons. I'm ain't gonna do the trike thing.

User avatar
brettchallenger
Posts: 457
Joined: Sat May 29, 2010 11:03 am
Location: Driffield, the East Riding of Yorkshire, England
Motorcycle: 1978 Triumph Tiger TR7 (sold)
2000 Honda GL1500 SE
1985 MZ ETZ250 (a cold war special).

Re: pushed over

Postby brettchallenger » Sat Aug 20, 2016 11:16 am

had to pick my 1500 up in the driveway again this morning


What caused it to fall over, was it parked on soft(ish) asphalt?
The game's afoot;
Follow your spirit: and upon this charge,
Cry — God for Harry! England and Saint George!

CrystalPistol
Posts: 261
Joined: Wed Mar 10, 2010 9:07 pm
Location: Shenandoah Valley of Virginia
Motorcycle: 1985 GL1200A
1997 GL1500SE Lehman Trike

Re: pushed over

Postby CrystalPistol » Sat Aug 20, 2016 1:30 pm

The Bus Driver wrote:I had to pick my 1500 up in the driveway again this morning,it was very early,so no extra help around. ... etc ... So this technique worked for me... maybe time for a Trike conversion.........NOT!!!!!
Glad it helped. It's in every "Gold Book" .... it works well with the Gold Wing that wears it's ample weight "down low". Even the gas tank is under the seat.
My experience so far is that "extra help" will usually want to grab for things like trunk racks, trunks, etc .... things that "break" or bust easily. :roll:

My view .... "Thanks, but let me try this myself first .... please!" ;)

Always make sure it's in gear before you start lifting ..... PITA to get it up to "that point" and it suddenly rolls back down. :D
Image

User avatar
Happytrails
Posts: 653
Joined: Wed Sep 04, 2013 6:13 pm
Location: Tarentum, Pennsylvania
Motorcycle: 1991 Goldwing 1500 SE

Re: pushed over

Postby Happytrails » Sat Aug 20, 2016 2:40 pm

Had my bike tip over twice so far. 2nd time was on uneven payment (that caused the bike to fall over) and gravel. Honestly wasn't sure if I was gonna pick it up with my feet sliding around on gravel but eventually got it. If its gonna fall over just let it or you might hurt you back or shoulders trying to save it. Its only 950lbs! :D





1991 GL1500 SE Anniversary Edition
Sun Flare Gold Metallic
Vallant Brown Inset


Return to “Goldwing Chat”




Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 6 guests