The brand-new 2018 Goldwing?


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Re: The brand-new 2018 Goldwing?

Post by WingAdmin » Tue Nov 08, 2016 11:20 am



FM-USA wrote:I've never had ABS on a bike, on cars sure but...
I never tested the ABS at a stop.
Scenario:
Vehicle not moving brakes are applied. Give it enough gas to overpower the brakes and the vehicle start moving.
Question:
Will you feel the jerky motion of the ABS or is the rotor turning to slow to activate the ABS and it's a normal brake situation?
:?:
ABS only works down to around 5-10 mph or so, after which it shuts down. That said, if you were applying enough brake pressure to have ABS actuate, I doubt you would be able to break the wheels free from a dead stop - there's an awful lot of stiction. You'd likely just end up burning out your clutch.



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Re: The brand-new 2018 Goldwing?

Post by silverado6x6 » Tue Nov 15, 2016 9:32 am

Since the election went quite differently i suspect a LOT of talk has been going on at Honda. I bet they might reopen the plant in America as well to reduce any tariffs plus to take advantage of hiring US workers or other incentives. Its all about jobs and being Made in the USA for the foreseeable future. Or....somebody else might create a Goldwing clone, all the stuff we wanted years ago but built HERE, AND NOW.

Indian could do it, but in all honesty a real Goldwing copy has to have a flat 6, or even an 8, full fairing and trunk space. No v twin, not air cooled, not as loud as a 747 on takeoff either.

So....if Honda doesn't think about this their could be a Trump effect, some outfit will make a better Goldwing here in America.
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Re: The brand-new 2018 Goldwing?

Post by FM-USA » Tue Nov 15, 2016 4:44 pm

silverado6x6 wrote:...Or....somebody else might create a Goldwing clone, all the stuff we wanted years ago but built HERE, AND NOW.
That was a thread I started in the (other) forum.
Oddly, I got folks wanting to hire in so people are eager.
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Re: The brand-new 2018 Goldwing?

Post by rachester67 » Thu Dec 01, 2016 4:05 pm

Haven't been on in a while and THANKS go out to WingAdmin for filling my shoes on the ABS. It was not an immediate sideways movement once I was on the plastic but it all seemed very quick to me when it happened.

And yes he did put out his cigarette before coming to my rescue.

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Re: The brand-new 2018 Goldwing?

Post by call-abe » Wed Feb 01, 2017 9:16 pm

Seems, over the years, that as men get taller the Goldwings (as well as some other bikes) sit LOWER!!! This is the very opposite than should happen.

I, myself, found that when I went from my GL1100 to GL1500 Goldwing that it was distinctly lower for this 6 foot 2 1/2 inch man. It made my legs,and particularly my knees cramp up and be uncomfortable -- particularly on long trips. Having highway pegs help -- but don't solve the problem. The only thing that helped (but didn't fully solve the problem, is putting a foam pad or a pillow under my butt to raise me up a bit. BUT WHY SHOULD I HAVE TO DO THAT???

I'd suggest to Honda that they perhaps design a rubber block system for their 2018 Goldwing seats that would come with the purchase. Should the owner wish to elevate the seat (and perhaps even get just a bit more cushioning from shocks, they'd easily install them under the seat to elevate the seat 1 1/2 to 2 inches. It would be at their election if they wish to do so -- it would be factory set at the lower level as it is now.

This seat leveling issue truly IS a pain in the ass for anybody over 6 feet and with normal or longer leg length. HOW about it Honda? Give some bigger riders a break -- and also give them a choice. Riding low may "look cool" around town -- but its a pain in the ass, knee, and leg going cross country! :)

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Re: The brand-new 2018 Goldwing?

Post by bstig60 » Thu Feb 02, 2017 11:13 pm

stephenricci wrote:The concept of using the engine as an integral part of the motorcycle’s structure is not a weight-reducing trick that is reserved for use on “many modern bikes”. Some vintage bikes used this approach as well. For example, my 1966 Honda 305 Superhawk and 1988 Yamaha Virago XV1100 both use the engine as part of the bikes frame. Not only does this save weight, it also makes working on the bike a little easier without a frame in the way. Thanks for the interesting article.
Yamaha used the engine as part of the frame on the entire product line of Virago's 81-99.
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Re: The brand-new 2018 Goldwing?

Post by jeff1 » Mon Feb 06, 2017 10:09 pm

Something to consider, I own a 1989 Yamaha Venture Royal. I have recently purchased a 1994 Goldwing SE to replace it. I belong to one of the Venture forums and many Venture owners have been wishing for a new Venture for a long time. The last Venture that was "Goldwing like" was 1992 or 1993, the Royal Star Venture introduced in the late '90s is arguably more of a cruiser style bike. I believe production on those ended last year with no replacement. I does appear that Yamaha has abandoned the market.
I will say one BIG advantage with my recently acquired Goldwing over the Venture is the availability of parts and accessories. There is flatly more available for the Goldwing than there ever was for the Venture in the 8 years I have owned it. I believe this has to do with numbers, the Goldwing has outsold every other metric touring bike. In my opinion the reason the Goldwing has sold well regardless of year is because it does everything it needs to do well or at least well enough. The Goldwing is also reliable like pretty much everything else Honda builds. Over the years there are bikes in the Goldwing's class that have done some things better than the Goldwing but the overall the Goldwing has always been very good. It probably doesn't hurt that it was first.
For me I am happy that the Goldwing has been produced as long as it has and sold in large enough numbers to justify it's continued production. For those of you wanting a new Goldwing it could worse, you could be waiting for a new Venture.
Now the snow needs to melt so I can actually ride my Wing!

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Re: The brand-new 2018 Goldwing?

Post by Sharon2665 » Tue Feb 14, 2017 10:58 pm

OutdoorPhotoMan wrote:Before anyone shuts down the idea of an automatic bike, go try one. I've ridden 60 bikes (and just bought the 60th one I've ridden). I feel the same about shifting gears on bikes as I do on cars: There's a time and a place where it is fun, and a time and place where it is just in the way and makes for a sloppy ride. My Mustang GT automatic could shift gears far faster than I could when gripping the wheel in accelerating turns. My CTX700 and NM4 are awesome when riding across town, where every stoplight is guaranteed to turn red, and stay red until you are sunburned or hail damaged. Imagine sitting at a red light without having to do the downshift-recheck dance or hold the clutch in. Imagine not having to downshift at all, but feeling the bike do it for you while you keep an eye on the texting teenager coming up behind you.

I was riding my Goldwing into Sturgis during the big year of 2015. Traffic was stop and go for about 3 miles. By the time I pulled in, my left hand was shot, despite the wing having an easier pull than any Harley. I decided to pull into the Indian dealership to take advantage of their parking. Instead of feathering, I released the clutch and missed taking out their display stand by only 3/4 off an inch!

My new Valkyrie is a muscle bike with stupid amounts of power, but also stupid gearing. 1st gear is too short to be of any use. Second gear can take you from 0 to 60 in around 4 seconds. Third and fourth are so short they should be combined. If you are accelerating to merge onto a freeway, you will be clicking through gears faster than you can click a pen. An automatic is a blast to simply roll on the power, and for a bike as sedated and cloud-like as my Goldwing, I think it would be a smart move. Besides, you still get manual control when you want it with a DCT; the paddle shifters work great to over ride the computer.

As far as mounting the engine to the frame, be ready to feel some buzzing vibration at times, which usually transfers to the pegs and bars.
I certainly understand what you are saying about having to live on the clutch in wall to wall traffic. We did Rt 66 this past September and the ride into Los Angeles and the pier was about 80 miles of downtown stop and go traffic with a light on every corner the whole way. Took us about 5 hrs just to go that short distance. I have bad arthritis in my hands and they were really shot by the end of that stretch along with my shifter foot/toe, my back, my butt, and my nerves. But I don't think I would have it any other way. Just doesn't seem like bike riding without the shifting and I like the personal control it offers. It would be a nice option though for those folks who either just want it or have some health reason that it makes it difficult for them to shift. I guess as long as you can still get them fully standard shift I'd be okay with them also having automatics!

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Re: The brand-new 2018 Goldwing?

Post by roadwanderer2 » Wed Feb 15, 2017 7:30 am

Honda already HAD a bike with an automatic transmission back in the early 80's. the 1981 Honda CM400T was such a bike. i was thinking about buying it as my first motorcycle, but i opted for the 82 Honda CM400E which was a 4 speed transmission. 1 down and 3 up.

stuart.

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Re: The brand-new 2018 Goldwing?

Post by WingAdmin » Wed Feb 15, 2017 8:58 am

roadwanderer2 wrote:Honda already HAD a bike with an automatic transmission back in the early 80's. the 1981 Honda CM400T was such a bike. i was thinking about buying it as my first motorcycle, but i opted for the 82 Honda CM400E which was a 4 speed transmission. 1 down and 3 up.

stuart.
Actually it was the CM400A ("A" for Automatic). But that was a very different type of transmission. Back then, they tried to emulate the "slushbox" type fluidic-drive transmission like those used in cars, with an actual torque converter linking the engine and output shaft, using engine oil as the fluid. It had only two speeds, and no neutral.

The automatic transmissions used in bikes today are more accurately called "computer controlled manual transmissions." They look and operate just like the manual transmissions today, with gears, dogs and clutches, except instead of having a hand-operated clutch and foot-operated shifter, it uses computer-controlled actuators to do all the shifting work. The latest ones, the "DCT" (dual clutch transmission" series, are one and a half transmissions - one output shaft and two input shafts, with each input shaft having its own clutch. One input shaft has gears 1, 3 and 5 on it, and the other input shaft has gears 2, 4 and 6.

That way, instead of declutching, shifting gears, and clutching to shift gears, the computer already has the next gear selected on the other input shaft. To shift gears, it simultaneously disengages one clutch while engaging the other - so the shift is pretty much instantaneous. The computer also controls the throttle, so that the engine speed is adjusted to match the new gear as it is selected, making the shifts smooth and almost imperceptible.

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Re: The brand-new 2018 Goldwing?

Post by roadwanderer2 » Wed Feb 15, 2017 9:03 am

oops, wingadmin, your correct it WAS the 400A, my mistake.

stuart.

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Re: The brand-new 2018 Goldwing?

Post by Dark Angel » Wed Feb 15, 2017 10:21 am

An auto clutch may be a better option. Rekluse could make something if they haven't already. We use them extensively in off road racing. Basically there is a disk with wedges in the clutch pack that replaces some of the fibers and steels. Depending on the weight of the wedges and which spring are in the disk, at a certain RPM level the wedges move out and expand the disk which has engages the steels and fibers just like releasing your clutch. You still have complete use of the clutch lever but when the RPMsget low the wedges retract and it is as if you have pulled in the clutch. Simple, cheap, effective. You still have to shift but never have to.hold or feather the clutch if you don't want to.
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Re: The brand-new 2018 Goldwing?

Post by landisr » Wed Feb 15, 2017 10:24 am

And don't forget the 750 automatic in the 70s.
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Re: The brand-new 2018 Goldwing?

Post by WingAdmin » Thu Feb 16, 2017 8:41 am

Dark Angel wrote:An auto clutch may be a better option. Rekluse could make something if they haven't already. We use them extensively in off road racing. Basically there is a disk with wedges in the clutch pack that replaces some of the fibers and steels. Depending on the weight of the wedges and which spring are in the disk, at a certain RPM level the wedges move out and expand the disk which has engages the steels and fibers just like releasing your clutch. You still have complete use of the clutch lever but when the RPMsget low the wedges retract and it is as if you have pulled in the clutch. Simple, cheap, effective. You still have to shift but never have to.hold or feather the clutch if you don't want to.
I don't know if that kind of clutch could work with a bike as heavy as a Wing, with as much torque as it is capable of producing. You'd probably end up slipping and burning up your clutch a lot sooner than you would otherwise.

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Re: The brand-new 2018 Goldwing?

Post by Dark Angel » Thu Feb 16, 2017 1:56 pm

They make them for Harleys. They would have to use the RadiusX tourque disk pack I assume. It consists on more thinner discs both steel and fiber. There would be no slipping under load with normal riding. With spirited riding perhaps, but no different than regular hand induced slip generally clutches last longer with that system because of the greater efficiency. For mx, they do recommened against full power 3rd gear starts. Plus we would be talking for folks who would just be using it as an anti stall who are more likely to ride less aggressively.
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Re: The brand-new 2018 Goldwing?

Post by jpooch00 » Sun Feb 19, 2017 6:19 pm

Well, if this actually comes to pass, then I assume that the old models will lose a lot of resale value. Maybe I'll get one for a good price and it'll be wearing out about the time that they get the bugs worked out of the new one.

Might think about "upgrading" then. ;)

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Re: The brand-new 2018 Goldwing?

Post by spiralout » Mon Feb 20, 2017 12:05 am

roadwanderer2 wrote:Honda already HAD a bike with an automatic transmission back in the early 80's. the 1981 Honda CM400T was such a bike. i was thinking about buying it as my first motorcycle, but i opted for the 82 Honda CM400E which was a 4 speed transmission. 1 down and 3 up.

stuart.
Betcha didn't know this was that automatic Honda 8-)



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Re: The brand-new 2018 Goldwing?

Post by DarthJ » Tue Feb 21, 2017 11:50 am

spiralout wrote: Betcha didn't know this was that automatic Honda 8-)
purple-rain-poster.jpg

Lol, actually pointed that out to my ex GF while we watched that. The stunt riders had the manual ones, but the Purple One's bike was the 400A
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Re: The brand-new 2018 Goldwing?

Post by Old Fogey » Sat Mar 11, 2017 7:28 pm

stephenricci wrote:The concept of using the engine as an integral part of the motorcycle’s structure is not a weight-reducing trick that is reserved for use on “many modern bikes”. Some vintage bikes used this approach as well. For example, my 1966 Honda 305 Superhawk and 1988 Yamaha Virago XV1100 both use the engine as part of the bikes frame. Not only does this save weight, it also makes working on the bike a little easier without a frame in the way. Thanks for the interesting article.
Go much further back in time; the Vincent 1000 had the engine as a stressed member.
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Re: The brand-new 2018 Goldwing?

Post by bstig60 » Sun Mar 12, 2017 9:58 am

Old Fogey wrote:
stephenricci wrote:The concept of using the engine as an integral part of the motorcycle’s structure is not a weight-reducing trick that is reserved for use on “many modern bikes”. Some vintage bikes used this approach as well. For example, my 1966 Honda 305 Superhawk and 1988 Yamaha Virago XV1100 both use the engine as part of the bikes frame. Not only does this save weight, it also makes working on the bike a little easier without a frame in the way. Thanks for the interesting article.
Go much further back in time; the Vincent 1000 had the engine as a stressed member.
The Virago Series from 1981 to 1999 use the engine as a stress member, so do the Yamaha Seca, Maxim models in the early years. IMHO it was a mistake when they decided to imitate a Harley.
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Re: The brand-new 2018 Goldwing?

Post by jpooch00 » Sun Jul 02, 2017 5:54 pm

That's truly a hideous bike with that ridiculous suspension system. Maybe they'll offer it in a "Rune" version too!

Hopefully not!

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Re: The brand-new 2018 Goldwing?

Post by wncryder » Wed Nov 01, 2017 2:54 am

A whopping 90# weight reduction! What a joke and insult to Goldwing riders! The redesign did little to actually lose the weight, Honda achieved the weight reduction by simply leaving off items Goldwing riders have come to expect as well as making everything else smaller.

No centerstand
No tip-over bars (Where are owners supposed to mount highway pegs/boards?)
Smaller gas tank
Smaller mirrors (To honda I guess safety doesn't matter)
Smaller windscreen (I have an oversize/tall windscreen on my 2012)
Smaller Fairing/less wind protection (This is why I didn't buy a 2001-2010 GL1800, waited for the 2012 with better wind protection)
Smaller side cases
Smaller trunk
No place to mount adequate passenger armrests

I can make my 2012 lighter by removing and doing most of the things Mother Honda did to the 2018. NO THANKS!!! My 2012 handles great in the corners for a big bike, if I wanted better handling I would get a sportbike and put bags on it like I did when I owned a 2002 CBRXX Blackbird. And, I already took a storage reduction when I went from the 1998 GL1500 to my current 2012 GL1800, no way am I willing to do that again. And now, Honda wants more $$$ for less bike (although it does have a lot of "whizz-bang" technology, which I would never figure out anyway) NO THANKS!!!

Sadly, the much anticipated 2018 Goldwing proves my friend right, the new touring bike to buy in 2018 is the new Yamaha.

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Re: The brand-new 2018 Goldwing?

Post by FM-USA » Wed Nov 01, 2017 7:00 am

A while back I asked,...
If the Wing wasn't produced, what bike would you buy?
It appears I may have given folks an early heads up.
I may never buy a new bike, due to a meager retirement, but I still look at the big picture even if I'm not in it.
The "New less Wing" I see it as Honda's way of tuning us to an even smaller bike package which is needed when it goes electric. Going smaller for electric will drastically hinder trailer pulling. Thinking further on this elec. anology, couples will need 2 bikes to haul enough gear for what their used to.
Sad day for us long haul riders.
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Re: The brand-new 2018 Goldwing?

Post by jpooch00 » Wed Nov 01, 2017 7:39 am

If they had changed the ergos, or even better, made them easily-owner-adjustable, then I would have already signed up for one. Since they apparently didn't, no interest here.

There's no way that I could ride one for more than an hour. Heck, after one minute or so, it felt like a knife between my shoulder blades and both hip joints felt like they were on fire when I demo'd a '15 GW. Brought it back less than ten minutes later and that was the end of that.

Something about the seating, leg/foot positioning and handlebar position just kills me - and I don't have any joint or shoulder problems at all, otherwise.

I was REALLY hoping they'd come up with some kind of easily-adjustable bars and a more stretched-out leg position, too. Now, it looks like they've even done away with the only way to mount highway pegs. Great! :x

I'd LOVE to own one and, now, I could even afford to pay cash - but no sale. Guess my '75 Wing will be my last (it was extremely uncomfortable too, but I was too young and stupid back then to expect any better!).

Maybe the next gen GW's will have better ergos - 'course, I'll be long-gone by then.

Oh well...

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Re: The brand-new 2018 Goldwing?

Post by WingVetteGSXR » Wed Nov 01, 2017 7:15 pm

There only isn't a stand on the "Bagger". But it can be added as an option.
There are tip over bars. Look at the pictures with the fairing removed. You can only see the business part of them and they're covered in plastic. Whether they will protect as well as the current Wing I don't know.
Smaller tank but approx. same range is claimed.
They claim entire bike is redesigned with same wind protection, but modified to get rid of the totally still air with adjustable vents.
Side cases are a travesty, no doubt.
Trunk isn't huge but it is 50 liters, which isn't all that terrible.
Passenger comfort does seem to be decreased. Time will tell.

Just my two cents.

Cheers!
wncryder wrote:
Wed Nov 01, 2017 2:54 am
A whopping 90# weight reduction! What a joke and insult to Goldwing riders! The redesign did little to actually lose the weight, Honda achieved the weight reduction by simply leaving off items Goldwing riders have come to expect as well as making everything else smaller.

No centerstand
No tip-over bars (Where are owners supposed to mount highway pegs/boards?)
Smaller gas tank
Smaller mirrors (To honda I guess safety doesn't matter)
Smaller windscreen (I have an oversize/tall windscreen on my 2012)
Smaller Fairing/less wind protection (This is why I didn't buy a 2001-2010 GL1800, waited for the 2012 with better wind protection)
Smaller side cases
Smaller trunk
No place to mount adequate passenger armrests

I can make my 2012 lighter by removing and doing most of the things Mother Honda did to the 2018. NO THANKS!!! My 2012 handles great in the corners for a big bike, if I wanted better handling I would get a sportbike and put bags on it like I did when I owned a 2002 CBRXX Blackbird. And, I already took a storage reduction when I went from the 1998 GL1500 to my current 2012 GL1800, no way am I willing to do that again. And now, Honda wants more $$$ for less bike (although it does have a lot of "whizz-bang" technology, which I would never figure out anyway) NO THANKS!!!

Sadly, the much anticipated 2018 Goldwing proves my friend right, the new touring bike to buy in 2018 is the new Yamaha.



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