Rear tire blow out


Anything goes - doesn't fit any other category!
  • Sponsored Links
Post Reply
anthonybeaver
Posts: 3
Joined: Fri Jun 24, 2016 11:36 pm
Location: Vader, WA
Motorcycle: 1990 Goldwing 1500

Rear tire blow out

Post by anthonybeaver » Tue Aug 01, 2017 1:28 pm



I'm new to this sight, well a year and I haven't posted anything. But something happened I just wanted to share. My wife and I went on a trip from Washington State to Arizona and back thru LasVagus. Around 700 miles into the trip I put my 1990 1500 on the center stand and checked air and turned the tires around to inspect them. I understand the tires are your lifeline. Front and back needed a couple pounds of air and they looked to have about 70 percent tread. Six days later after being in Phoenix with 120 degree heat and Las Vagus with 114 degrees, We headed for the cooler hwy 101 to go home. To make a long story short ( probably to late ) The rear tire blew out at 65 mph. I reduced the speed to , I'm guessing 45-50 and we went down. After picking the bike up at the tow yard I saw the back tire, it was showing cord nearly all the way around. It went from a 70 percent tread to total junk in 6 days and about 1200 miles. I'm assuming it was because of the heat and maybe because I was pulling a trailer. We both went to the hospital and was released an hour and a half later. A lot of road rash and lots of bruises. I'm so thankful that we were relatively fine. I could have gone wrong in so many different ways. I guess the reason I'm posting is, checking tires more often may save someone else from making this mistake. Maybe its a well known thing to check them every so many miles, I'v been riding for 25-30 years and I didn't know. So anyway's thats it in a nut shell.

Anyone have thoughts on repurposing a wrecked goldwing 1500?? I saw on the interweb someone turned a gl1500 into a dirt bike, it was pretty cool looking. After looking at all the pieces that are broke, cracked, scraped, bent. I think its not worth fixing. Started right up after we got home.....

Wife and I are getting around again, still sore but healing fast

Hope I'm in the correct forum :D :D :D



User avatar
thrasherg
Posts: 2049
Joined: Tue Oct 20, 2009 11:21 am
Location: Plano, TX
Motorcycle: 2017 Yamaha FZ07, 2015 Yamaha Super Tenere ES, 2005 Honda Shadow 750, CRF450X, CRF230, CRF250X, XR200, CR500, Gas Gas TXT200

Re: Rear tire blow out

Post by thrasherg » Tue Aug 01, 2017 1:36 pm

Really sorry to hear about this, I hope you both make a full recovery and quickly. Goldwings are heavy girls and do put a lot of strain on the tyres, so the extra heat and trailer may have been enough to cause the tyre to wear very quickly, I hope it hasn't put either of you off the idea of getting back on a motorbike.

Best wishes.

Gary

User avatar
themainviking
Posts: 2925
Joined: Wed Sep 29, 2010 6:59 pm
Location: North Bay, Ontario, Canada
Motorcycle: 2009 GL1800 AD

Re: Rear tire blow out

Post by themainviking » Tue Aug 01, 2017 2:16 pm

I make it a point, when on a trip, to check the tires every morning. No I am not some kinda hero. I have had problems with tires in the past from not checking them, and I learned from it. I have been really lucky and have not dropped a bike from a blowout, but it is a scary thing to have happen on the highway. The last time I blew a tire was on a Harley Softail in North Dakota in 1994, and hotter than hell. When I looked at the tire, it also, like yours, was tire threads all around the carcass. This was on a Saturday of a July Fourth Weekend. A kind farmer helped me wrestle the bike up into his pickup and he dropped me and the bike at a Harley dealership in Minot, at 10:30 in the morning of that Saturday. The owner called one of his guys in and had him swap out the tire for me, then they closed up for the Fourth Wknd. He did not even charge me for the tire, which was a pretty decent thing to do. I was in Fargo by nightfall, no worse for wear.

Like Gary, I hope this does not turn you away from getting another ride and doing just that - ride.
It ain't about the destination - it's all about the journey

Image

User avatar
cbx4evr
Posts: 1455
Joined: Tue Mar 09, 2010 8:35 pm
Location: Edmonton, AB Canada
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500SE - sold :-(
2004 Kawasaki KLR 650
Solex 5000 - gave to son
1980 Honda CBX - sold :-(
1981 Honda CBX - sold :-(
Contact:

Re: Rear tire blow out

Post by cbx4evr » Tue Aug 01, 2017 4:51 pm

Glad you made it out okay. Curious to know the brand and model of tire you were running.
"It´s a friggen motorcycle, it´s not supposed to be comfortable, quiet or safe. The wind noise is supposed to hurt your ears, the seat should be hard and riding it should make you s**t your pants every now and then. "

User avatar
MikeB
Posts: 1906
Joined: Fri Dec 04, 2009 12:54 pm
Location: Tacoma, WA
Motorcycle: 1998 - GL1500 Aspencade.
2003 - GL1800A

Re: Rear tire blow out

Post by MikeB » Tue Aug 01, 2017 5:31 pm

anthonybeaver wrote:
Tue Aug 01, 2017 1:28 pm
Anyone have thoughts on repurposing a wrecked goldwing 1500?? I saw on the interweb someone turned a gl1500 into a dirt bike, it was pretty cool looking. After looking at all the pieces that are broke, cracked, scraped, bent. I think its not worth fixing. Started right up after we got home.....
Its so unfortunate that this happened and I"m happy to hear you are recovering.

As to the bike, how wrecked is it? What will Insurance cover? Are you technically and physically able to work on the bike? You can put it back in like new condition with time. Just about any kind of part you may need is available as used on eBay or new through Partzilla.

And yes, please tell us what tires you were using.
MikeB
Tacoma, WA, USA

anthonybeaver
Posts: 3
Joined: Fri Jun 24, 2016 11:36 pm
Location: Vader, WA
Motorcycle: 1990 Goldwing 1500

Re: Rear tire blow out

Post by anthonybeaver » Tue Aug 01, 2017 11:37 pm

It was a Metzeler marathon. Yes we will ride again, my wife isn't sure about cross country but she isn't afraid. As far as rebuilding, its 27 years old with 86k miles. I'm not sure its really worth it. I'd like to up-grade to a 1800 anyway. I may do some project with it , but probably just sell it as or maybe part it out. You're right, lots of parts on ebay and other sights. But when you really start looking there is lots of parts to replace.

Yes , thank you all we are healing better than could be expected. Still finding gravel here and there.

I've learned a valuable lesson about tires. I hope someone else because of this post will prevent an accident or even a life. Safe motoring one and all...

Tony

User avatar
MikeB
Posts: 1906
Joined: Fri Dec 04, 2009 12:54 pm
Location: Tacoma, WA
Motorcycle: 1998 - GL1500 Aspencade.
2003 - GL1800A

Re: Rear tire blow out

Post by MikeB » Wed Aug 02, 2017 12:02 am

I do not know what type of failure you had on the tires but I think you should read what the members of this board have been sayung about the Metzler Tires viewtopic.php?f=10&t=37981
MikeB
Tacoma, WA, USA

User avatar
Scooter363y
Posts: 129
Joined: Mon Jun 29, 2015 7:39 pm
Location: Marysville,ohio
Motorcycle: 2014 gl1800

Re: Rear tire blow out

Post by Scooter363y » Wed Aug 02, 2017 9:03 am

Well you just have to focus on the good things. You and the wife are not seriously hurt. Goldwings can be fixed or replaced. It could be good for you to get a new goldwing with those new fancy features if all the rumors going around are true.

Ride safe
Scooter

User avatar
cbx4evr
Posts: 1455
Joined: Tue Mar 09, 2010 8:35 pm
Location: Edmonton, AB Canada
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500SE - sold :-(
2004 Kawasaki KLR 650
Solex 5000 - gave to son
1980 Honda CBX - sold :-(
1981 Honda CBX - sold :-(
Contact:

Re: Rear tire blow out

Post by cbx4evr » Wed Aug 02, 2017 9:29 am

anthonybeaver wrote:
Tue Aug 01, 2017 11:37 pm
It was a Metzeler marathon.
Tony
That's what I was afraid of when I asked the question. As was pointed out read the thread about those tires. Seems like maybe legal action is required to get Metzler to address the problem.

Any chance you can put up a picture of the tire?
"It´s a friggen motorcycle, it´s not supposed to be comfortable, quiet or safe. The wind noise is supposed to hurt your ears, the seat should be hard and riding it should make you s**t your pants every now and then. "

User avatar
Mag
Posts: 1417
Joined: Sun Mar 25, 2012 11:58 am
Location: Silverlake, WA
Motorcycle: 1982 Yamaha Venture (Crashed/Sold)
1982 1100 Silver Goldwing (sold)
1989 1500 Beige Goldwing (sold)
1988 1500 Beige Goldwing (current ride)

Re: Rear tire blow out

Post by Mag » Wed Aug 02, 2017 10:25 am

Hey there neighbor, I am just down the highway from you near Castle Rock. Now that I have had a couple of times to take the plastics on and off the bike, if you want some help, let me know.

I was riding yesterday, and it was damn hot going down the I-5, I should check my tires just to see how they weared, they are dunlops so should be ok.

Drop me a msg and I can show you where I order, etc.

User avatar
MikeB
Posts: 1906
Joined: Fri Dec 04, 2009 12:54 pm
Location: Tacoma, WA
Motorcycle: 1998 - GL1500 Aspencade.
2003 - GL1800A

Re: Rear tire blow out

Post by MikeB » Wed Aug 02, 2017 10:33 am

And I'm just up the road in Tacoma. However at the moment I'm in SoCal doing a little bit of a ride and some visiting but I'll be back next week if you need help let me know.
MikeB
Tacoma, WA, USA

Bobwquinn
Posts: 14
Joined: Sun Nov 11, 2012 4:07 pm
Location: Shediac, New Brunswick, Canada
Motorcycle: 1997 Goldwing GL1500

Re: Rear tire blow out

Post by Bobwquinn » Sun Sep 03, 2017 7:12 am

Glad to hear you both are ok! I too had a blown rear tire last year. It took months to heal my sore bones (no broken ones) and get my bike in shape & confidence back. It is something that stays with you but have to shake off. Good luck and hope you get another wing!

Bob

anthonybeaver
Posts: 3
Joined: Fri Jun 24, 2016 11:36 pm
Location: Vader, WA
Motorcycle: 1990 Goldwing 1500

Re: Rear tire blow out

Post by anthonybeaver » Sun Sep 03, 2017 2:48 pm

Thanks for all of you're thoughts and comments. My wife and I are doing good, all healed up. I'm pondering if I should sell the Wing Or re-purpose it. I noticed on the old internet a photo of a GL1500 turned into a motocross bike. It was pretty cool looking. I was looking at the parts to replace to put back into a Goldwing. They start adding up fast. It runs great but nearly all the plastic, chrome, or acc. are broken, scraped up.

User avatar
MikeB
Posts: 1906
Joined: Fri Dec 04, 2009 12:54 pm
Location: Tacoma, WA
Motorcycle: 1998 - GL1500 Aspencade.
2003 - GL1800A

Re: Rear tire blow out

Post by MikeB » Sun Sep 03, 2017 3:06 pm

Was it insured? Did you get a repair estimate? The Honda dealer will do a repair estimate for about an hours worth of shop charge, about $100. If it was insured, the insurance will reimburse for the estimate shop charge. Did you get an insurance settlement?
MikeB
Tacoma, WA, USA

User avatar
Mh434
Posts: 1178
Joined: Tue Mar 25, 2014 10:24 pm
Location: Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
Motorcycle: 1997 gl1500 SE
Previous:
1981 GL1100I
1989 Kawasaki Concours

Re: Rear tire blow out

Post by Mh434 » Mon Sep 04, 2017 12:30 pm

As for the tire itself, we always need to remember that heat is the dire enemy of tires.

Ride hard/fast? Tire temps soar.
Heavily loaded? Tire temps soar.
Scorching hot road? Tire temps soar...and so do tire pressures.

On 'Wings, even when the tires are cold, we're operating on the ragged edge of the tire's design parameters. On a car, tires are usually only loaded to a small fraction of what the tires can safely carry. On a 'Wing, however, we're probably loaded to within 90% of our tires' capacity, and that's when the tires are COLD!

Here's a scenario to ponder: You're in Vegas in July, where the mid-day temperatures can get pretty hot. You and your wife get up early, to get a start before it gets too hot. You check your tire pressures, and add a few pounds to bring them up to max, as you're running pretty heavily loaded (and maybe even exceeding the tires' maximum safe cold loading), hitch up the trailer, and off you go. You feel your tires should be just fine, as they still have most of their tread, and after all, they're only 3 or 4 years old.

Of course, tires degrade every, single day after they're made, so add in the 2-3 years of shelf life degradation before they were shipped to you, and you might find they're actually 5-7 years old.

As the temperature climbs, the tires get hot, and tire pressure begins to rise. Drive on some new blacktop, where the surface temperature can be hundreds of degrees in the sun (we've all seen videos of people frying eggs on hot pavement, right?), and internal tire pressures climb very, very fast. Get up to freeway speed, substantially increasing tire carcass heat & internal temperatures.

Add all those things together, and your dry, relatively inflexible tires are strained far, far beyond what they can sustain. Extreme heat and pressure can cause all sorts of internal failures, including delamination, etc. At freeway speeds such a failure can be catastrophic.

How to avoid such a failure?

Make sure your tires are of recent manufacture. There are codes molded into the side of the carcass which, when decoded, will give the exact date of manufacture. If you see tiny little surface cracks on the tread or sidewall, JUNK THE TIRE. It's tired, it's breaking down, it's brittle, and it can't take substantive pressure variations. On a car it's not as crucial, but on a bike it is, literally, a matter of life and death.

If you're going to be riding in hot weather, etc., as in the foregoing scenario, check your tire pressures OFTEN - not just when they're cold, when you start out, but also when they can be expected to be getting hotter. REMEMBER - the max pressure on the tire's carcass is for when the tire is COLD, NOT for when it's hot.

Tire Rack offers this: "The rule of thumb is for every 10° Fahrenheit change in air temperature, tire pressures will change about 2% (up with higher temperatures and down with lower).

If the tire in my scenario started off at 40 psi at, say, 80 degrees F, and the carcass temperature rose to 250 degrees (very likely, in the scenario above), pressure would rise by 35 psi, to 75 psi. That is FAR beyond the tire's design parameters (almost double the maximum allowable pressure), and a failure (particularly in an older tire) is inevitable.

Just something to think about...

User avatar
MikeB
Posts: 1906
Joined: Fri Dec 04, 2009 12:54 pm
Location: Tacoma, WA
Motorcycle: 1998 - GL1500 Aspencade.
2003 - GL1800A

Re: Rear tire blow out

Post by MikeB » Mon Sep 04, 2017 3:06 pm

Mh434 wrote:
Mon Sep 04, 2017 12:30 pm
As for the tire itself, we always need to remember that heat is the dire enemy of tires.
Reading your post got me thinking and if that was your purpose, good job.

First, the tire temps are pretty much always higher than ambient temps. I have seen my rear tires as much as 50 degrees above ambient air temps as indicated on my aftermarket TPMS. This was when the ambient temp was at 104 degrees farenheit. I've never stopped to check the road temp but I imagine it is at least 20 to 25 degres above ambient temps on a sunny day. In cooler temps, I've seen the tire temps between 15 and 25 degrees above ambient. I do not remember ever seeig the tire temp exceed 155 degrees

Second, I've seen my tire pressures climb above the cold tire pressure setting by as much as 18 psi. I have never seen it exceed 20 psi from cold tire pressure setting. That may be because I try maintain proper tire pressures. If the cold tire pressure is low, you have a better chance of seing your tire temperatures climb rapidly at speed. An underinflated tire can't maintain its shape and becomes flatter than intended while in contact with the road. If the tires are underinflated by only 6 psi it could lead to tire failure. Additionally, the tire's tread life could be reduced by as much as 25%. Lower inflation pressure will allow the tire to deflect (bend) more as it rolls. This will build up internal heat, increase rolling resistance and cause a reduction in fuel economy of up to 5% I try not to exceed the maximum cold tire pressures of 41 psi front, 42 psi rear as indicated on the Dunlop E4 tire sidewalls. Recommended tire pressure for the Gold Wing, GL1500 and GL1800, is 36 front and 41 rear, cold with max load.

Third, The rule of thumb is to replace tires when they are 6 years old, even if they appear to be in good condition. Look on the outer sidewall for the acronym “DOT,” which should be followed by a series of numbers. The last four digits are what you need to determine when the tire was manufactured. The first two numbers represent the week, and the second pair indicates the year.

For example, a tire with the digits 2510 was made in the 25th week of 2010.

Read more about your tires here --> Motorcycle Industry Council, Tire Guide, All you need to know about street motorcycle tires. http://www.mic.org/downloads/MIC_Tire_Guide_2012V1.pdf

I have to say, I have never heard of a tire failure due to tire that was over inflated. However, I have heard of tire failures due to underinflation.
MikeB
Tacoma, WA, USA

User avatar
Mh434
Posts: 1178
Joined: Tue Mar 25, 2014 10:24 pm
Location: Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
Motorcycle: 1997 gl1500 SE
Previous:
1981 GL1100I
1989 Kawasaki Concours

Re: Rear tire blow out

Post by Mh434 » Mon Sep 04, 2017 3:37 pm

Yes, my goal was to get people thinking about their tires...they're not a "fire and forget" proposition!

As a collision investigator, I occasionally came across over-inflation-related failures in motorcycle tires. They were almost exclusively catastrophic blow-out failures, rather than partial delaminations, tread separations, etc. As we seldom get high temperatures in this part of the world, the over-inflation was usually a result of gross mishandling by the user.

You're right about under inflation being a major issue, as well. Under inflation causes more sidewall & tread deflection than the tire is designed to withstand, causing friction, which causes heat. We've all seen (and dodged) semi truck tire "gatorbacks" on the side of the highway - usually a result of under-inflation (usually from a leak) causing dramatic internal heating to the point where the tire literally explodes...sometimes, in flames.

Gross over-inflation due to overloading & high temperatures can also cause blowouts - different causes, same results. Had it happen to me, once, years ago, on a prior motorcycle. The shop that installed the new rear tire grossly over-inflated the tire to seat it, and neglected to reduce the pressure back to normal, and the tire blew apart on a highway run. Thankfully, as I've had a lot of experience with dirt bikes, etc., I was able to ride it from highway speed to a stop without dropping it.

Could I do that on my 'Wing? Nah - not a chance.

User avatar
garwil
Posts: 88
Joined: Sat Jul 07, 2012 9:08 pm
Location: Memphis, Tennessee
Motorcycle: 1999 GL1500SE
2002 ST1100

Re: Rear tire blow out

Post by garwil » Fri Sep 15, 2017 2:51 pm

Had a rear tire blow out in southern Utah last summer.
Dunlop Elite III with 80% tread.
GL1500SE, two up, with a trailer.
I-15 going 85 mph.

We had rode across from Dove Creek to Salina, Ut the day before and early the next morning we got onto I-5.
I was only riding the superslab from Scripio to Holden and I just felt like enjoying the speed. The morning was not hot yet and it was only a few miles.
When I was within site of the exit, I felt the wobble start and was able to get off the gas and bring her to a stop without going down.
Temperatures were still mild (70ish) as it was about 8:30 AM.
When I got stopped, I put the bike on the center stand and rotated it to see if I could see what made it go flat. I never could find any damage to the tire. No nail, nothing.
The tire was very hot.
I tried airing it up with a CO2 cylinder, but I could not get the bead to seal. Ended up getting towed to Salt Lake City where they installed a new E3.

I didn't get to see the tire after it was removed, so I still do not know where and how it failed.
I suspect the combination of Speed and Load caused it to overheat and fail. Possibly, the ride across southern UT the day before damaged it as the temp was over 100 all day.
I was not worried because it was essentially a new tire.

wadat1@yahoo.com
Posts: 3
Joined: Tue Jan 03, 2017 10:56 pm
Location: Perth, Western Australia
Motorcycle: Honda Goldwing 2010 GL1800 Luxury

Re: Rear tire blow out

Post by wadat1@yahoo.com » Sun Oct 01, 2017 2:44 am

A couple of years back the rear tire on my GL 1500 lost a large patch in the centre of the running surface. The tire had just done 10,000 km and I had been pulling a camper trailer for about 4,000 km of that distance. It was a Metzler tyre. This happened on a very hot day in the north of Australia. We were stranded in Derby (WA) for 4 days waiting for a new tire to come by truck. Here in Australia, tires are considered dangerous goods and are not allowed on planes!
My next Metzler tire lost all its profile in a 1 inch wide strip all around in the centre. This time no trailer and it was a cold and miserable morning.
After this experience I switched to Bridgestone and never had any problems with my tires ever again.

Some friends of mine with heavy bikes (2 Harleys, 1 Vulcan) had exactly the same problem with the same (Metzler) tire. They just disintegrated at moderate speeds.
My advice: Do not buy a Metzler tire if you ride a heavy bike.

User avatar
702scottc
Posts: 318
Joined: Tue May 15, 2012 12:12 am
Location: Las Vegas, Nevada
Motorcycle: 1980 GL1100 Interstate (sold)
1990 GL1500 Aspencade (sold)
2005 GL1800

Re: Rear tire blow out

Post by 702scottc » Sun Oct 01, 2017 11:11 am

It's good to hear that you and your wife weren't seriously injured. I had a similar experience on my 1500 twice, both with Kenda tires. I replaced both front and rear with the oem recommended Dunlop tires and had no more issues. Like some of the earlier posts stated, the 1500 is a really heavy bike just sitting. Add 2 people, gear and high ambient air temps and crazy asphalt temps, I've measured 165 degrees here in summer.. The rear tire is really taking a beating and it's a testament to the the design that more don't let go. Here in southern Nevada you see lots of blowouts on cars and trucks. On my 1800 it only gets oem recommended tires, Bridgestone or Dunlop. On the 1800 they went to a larger rear tire and radials which helps quite a bit with load capabilities and radial tires run a bit cooler by design. Since the rear tire on the 1500 is such great fun to replace, my suggestion is stick with the oem tires, stay away from Metzler tires. Nothing but horror stories about them.

User avatar
PastoT
Posts: 377
Joined: Sun Jul 01, 2012 9:20 pm
Location: Mt Home, Idaho
Motorcycle: 2002 GL1800 (122k)

Re: Rear tire blow out

Post by PastoT » Mon Oct 02, 2017 10:12 pm

So glad to hear you and your wife weren't injured worse and that you will both ride again. I have yet to have a blow out but probably change out my tires early for just that reason. My long trips are similar, riding through the desert from Idaho to Tucson and have had a few business trips to Las Vegas. I noticed this last trip that the sometimes road hazardous surface and high temps take a toll on one's tires. I usually get about 18-9k on a set of Dunlops. My last set of E-4s had maybe 4 or 5k left on them when I left Idaho for Las Vegas and Tucson where the temps were well over 110 daily except for maybe 2 days out of 3 weeks. I knew I would have to watch the tread wear and had no issue putting new rubber on during my trip if needed, but I also had brand new E-4s in the garage, next to the previous set of E-3s that also have about 5k left on them from a year ago that I swapped before my last trip. I understand cold max psi is not the max design for a tire; they all heat up and their pressures exceed cold psi maximums all the time. Still I've never seen the max pressure for the tire listed in any source for guidance once the tire heats up! I'd be hard pressed to believe high pressure is the issue as much as high temp tread wear; pretty clear your tire wore to where the carcass would not contain the normally acceptable pressure. It sounds like we ride in similar conditions and many others are in our high temp boat! This is should be a real eye opener for all of us cooking out here. I'm pretty much a Dunlop devotee as I've had a valve stem blow and it road fine for 30 miles until the tire warmed up and got squishy (that's a 0 psi rear tire test down I-17 at highway speed with a trailer that had a good ending). This last trip back was plagued at the end with excessive heat warnings and temps over 115F for two days with a loaded trailer, and a spare DS rear tire slung beneath it. I checked tire pressures every other fuel stop on the highway. On day two of my return, I checked air pressure when I filled up before leaving Vegas for Idaho and it was fine and didn't notice anything but some feathering on my rear tire. When I made it home 600 miles later I still hadn't felt any uncomfortable tire wear but the shoulders of the rear wore badly and actually had large flat areas off center that were nearing a concaved appearance and still pressure the was dead on the money at 44psi cold. There are some long sweeping curves on the road I ride from Vegas in both directions and I could see clearly their impact on my tires in such heat. I only got 2500 of the last 4 or 5 thousand miles left in those tires. There was still tread grooves left and certainly no belts showing but I was amazed the wear they absorbed in the last 1100 miles of high heat riding. Upon return I put my new DS rear on to experimented with it until my new E-4s were installed. My plan is to ride long trips with the DS rear when I have a trailer to preserve my MT rear and still have the unused wheel slung under the trailer as a spare, it only takes 20 minutes to swap and having an available rear spare eases my mind riding in the middle of the wild west. Oh yea, my DS is also a Dunlop by chance but not advertised as a RF, still not sure DS is for me. Glad ya'll are ok, sorry to hear about your wheels. Hope you can adapt to a new Wing the timing may have been fated!


Tom, in Mountain Home, Idaho
2002 GL1800 (Illusion Red) Non-ABS, 122k miles
Retired Air Force

"Audentes Fortuna Juvat"

Post Reply