Situational Awareness


Anything goes - doesn't fit any other category!
  • Sponsored Links
Post Reply
User avatar
wellman
Posts: 24
Joined: Tue Jun 03, 2014 9:22 pm
Location: Christiansburg, VA
Motorcycle: 1974 Yamaha Enduro 125 (sold)
1982 Kawasaki LTD 550 (sold)
1983 Kawasaki GPZ 550 (sold)
1992 Kawasaki Vulcan 1500(sold)
2000 GL1500 SE ( my favorite!)
2007 Honda CRF230F
2008 Harley Davidson Super Glide Custom FXDC

Situational Awareness

Post by wellman » Tue Oct 03, 2017 8:02 pm



This may have been mentioned before but not bad idea to mention again. We all think the post title, Situational Awareness, only applies to the area of personal safety/ defense. Applies a lot to the way we ride.
This past Sunday I was on my way to a wedding in Clemmons, NC. As a side story once I got to the wedding venue (3 hour ride), a place called Tanglewood Park I was informed at the front gate that they did not allow motorcycles, no exceptions. I missed the wedding, long story.
I digress, back to the subject. On I-77 the traffic was moderate and I was running a little late so decided to hang in there and stay away from most of the traffic.
At some point I found myself third in line of several vehicles, we were in passing lane coming upon a tractor trailer unit moving. Following my normal procedure I was lagging a little to complete the pass in one quick motion. During this time of deciding when to make the pass I smelled something familiar but could not quite place what it was. As the odor got stronger it finally dawned on me what it was, hot rubber! I immediately concluded that the truck or trailer was ready to blow a tire. Was in process of backing off to get away from dangerous situation when the unexpected happened - the first car in our line blew a left front tire! Swerved to the left into median then back across the lane barely missing the truck/ trailer. I quickly glanced over my shoulder again ( remember, I was thinking about the smell) to make sure nothing was there. Then ducked behind truck, ran on the shoulder for a bit and was then able to get away from the whole mess. Driver of the car did a great job maintaining and I did not see anything in my mirror.
Just keep in mind that all of our senses come into play when playing with our toys out in the real world. I believe in God and prayer, and I don't say that flippantly. Said a prayer of thanks after that and for continued protection. Should be something we do everyday.
Sorry for such a long post, just thought it was important.
Thanks
Paul



User avatar
landisr
Posts: 453
Joined: Tue Jul 28, 2009 12:18 pm
Location: Gilbert, AZ
Motorcycle: 1976 GL1000
1994 GL1500A

Re: Situational Awareness

Post by landisr » Thu Oct 05, 2017 10:07 pm

Glad you made it out of that ok. It's always good to keep your 'head' where it belongs while riding.

Thanks for sharing.

Ron in AZ
Beam me up, Scotty. There's no intelligent life down here.

User avatar
brettchallenger
Posts: 654
Joined: Sat May 29, 2010 11:03 am
Location: Driffield, the East Riding of Yorkshire, England
Motorcycle: 1978 Triumph Tiger TR7 (sold)
2000 Honda GL1500 SE
1985 MZ ETZ250 (a cold war special).

Re: Situational Awareness

Post by brettchallenger » Fri Oct 06, 2017 3:18 am

You should have told them at the gate that you identify yourself as a transgender, black lesbian, and that you are going to sue for discrimination. They would have let you in like a shot.
Last edited by brettchallenger on Fri Oct 06, 2017 3:31 am, edited 1 time in total.
Never trust a nation whose armed forces goose-step

User avatar
brettchallenger
Posts: 654
Joined: Sat May 29, 2010 11:03 am
Location: Driffield, the East Riding of Yorkshire, England
Motorcycle: 1978 Triumph Tiger TR7 (sold)
2000 Honda GL1500 SE
1985 MZ ETZ250 (a cold war special).

Re: Situational Awareness

Post by brettchallenger » Fri Oct 06, 2017 3:28 am

In the UK your sense of smell is used primarity to detect diesel spillage. This is especially common and hazardous on roundabouts. I know roundabouts are not a frequent encounter on US roads but here they can be every few hundred yards or so in city suburbs. Early mornings are worst when trucks/buses have fueled up for the day and squeezed in as much diesel as their tanks will hold. However, when negotiating the tight bend of a roundabout, centrifugal force often ejects some of the diesel leaving a horrendously slippy surface which is very difficult to see. But you can smell it and hopefully take appropriate avoidance action.


Never trust a nation whose armed forces goose-step

Post Reply