NHTSA Motorcycle Findings for 2015


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WingAdmin
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NHTSA Motorcycle Findings for 2015

Post by WingAdmin » Sat Dec 30, 2017 1:37 pm



The NHTSA Motorcycle Traffic Safety Fact Sheet is out for statistics year 2015. You can read the whole thing here:

https://crashstats.nhtsa.dot.gov/api/pu ... ion/812353

Some of the numbers for 2015:

Overall
4,976 motorcyclists killed, an 8% increase from 2014 (4,594)
88,000 motorcyclists injured, 3% decrease from 2014 (92,000)
Motorcycles accounted for 14% of all traffic fatalities, despite accounting for only 2% of all road traffic, and only 0.6% of all vehicle miles traveled
Of motorcycle fatalities, 94% were riders, 6% were passengers
The number of registered motorcycles increased, with 8.6 million in 2015, 200,000 more than 2014.

Situations
33% of all motorcycle fatalities occurred in intersections
38% of all motorcycle fatalities occurred at night
17% of motorcycle fatalities occurred on freeway/expressways. 51% occurred on principal and minor arterial roads.
74% of motorcycle crashes were frontal collisions - i.e. the motorcyclist's fault.
24% of the fatal motorcycle crashes were with stationary objects.
41% of the fatal motorcycle crashes involved a vehicle turning left in front of the motorcycle.
33% of fatal motorcycle crashes involved speeding.

Alcohol
In 27% of fatal motorcycle crashes, the rider was legally alcohol-impaired. A further 7% were alcohol impaired, but below the legal limit.
Motorcycle fatal crashes had a higher percentages of alcohol-impaired riders than any other vehicle type.
Of those motorcycle riders who were killed in single-vehicle crashes (i.e. rider lost control, no other vehicle involved), 42% of them were legally alcohol-impaired.
Of those who were killed on a weekend night, 63% of them were alcohol-impaired.

Helmets
Overall helmet use in the US was 61% in 2015.
1,772 riders involved in accidents would not have survived without their helmets.
740 riders fatally injured could have survived had they been wearing a helmet.



RoadRunner15
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Re: NHTSA Motorcycle Findings for 2015

Post by RoadRunner15 » Sat Dec 30, 2017 2:00 pm

Very Interesting! Thanks for sharing.

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brettchallenger
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Re: NHTSA Motorcycle Findings for 2015

Post by brettchallenger » Sat Dec 30, 2017 6:43 pm

Unfortunately, we do not have similar detailed motorcycle statistics available in the UK. But for what it is worth here are some.

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dingdong
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Re: NHTSA Motorcycle Findings for 2015

Post by dingdong » Sun Dec 31, 2017 9:07 am

740 riders fatally injured could have survived had they been wearing a helmet.

Very surprised by this stat. "fact".?? Seems to me this should be a higher number.
Tom

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Re: NHTSA Motorcycle Findings for 2015

Post by RCAFRotorhead » Mon Jan 01, 2018 6:32 am

Interesting topic. I had a quick skim through and my old Unit Flight Safety Officer comes out in me... The helmet bit is a no brainer: safety gear saves lives, period. Quite frankly anyone not wearing a helmet these days on a motorbike shouldn't be riding in the first place.

I do like their breakdowns and find them benifitial. One breakdown that is not there that would be really interesting to see is by motorcycle type (ie. sport bike vs touring bikes).

All this said, there are many lessons that can be gleaned out of this and I think this group in particular is well on its way to doing so. I noted in the monthly newsletter just released that our faithful admin wrote a bit on "Why Did He Crash?", both encouraging us to take the time to read on others mistakes and also providing some starting points and links. I plan to read both in the near future. I would like to says thanks for his efforts as well, it's greatly appreciated and the sign of a professional organisation when we openly share our lessons to help each other improve our related skills.

Ride safe (sorry, dreaming of riding now with all the white stuff out) or drive safe depending on your locale... :)

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Re: NHTSA Motorcycle Findings for 2015

Post by DaveO430 » Fri Jan 12, 2018 8:00 am

WingAdmin wrote:
Sat Dec 30, 2017 1:37 pm


Situations
33% of all motorcycle fatalities occurred in intersections
38% of all motorcycle fatalities occurred at night
17% of motorcycle fatalities occurred on freeway/expressways. 51% occurred on principal and minor arterial roads.
74% of motorcycle crashes were frontal collisions - i.e. the motorcyclist's fault.
24% of the fatal motorcycle crashes were with stationary objects.
41% of the fatal motorcycle crashes involved a vehicle turning left in front of the motorcycle.
33% of fatal motorcycle crashes involved speeding.
Some of those numbers don't add up in my mind. If 17% occurred on freeways and 51% on other roads, where did the rest happen? Does this include off road bikes?
If 74% of frontal collisions were the riders fault and 41% were vehicles turning left in front of them, 15% were not the one doing the left turns fault? Maybe some of those speeders were determined at fault in those cases. Maybe if I read the whole article it would become clear but I get bored and lost in long statistical articles.

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Re: NHTSA Motorcycle Findings for 2015

Post by AZgl1800 » Fri Jan 12, 2018 11:54 am

DaveO430 wrote:
Fri Jan 12, 2018 8:00 am
WingAdmin wrote:
Sat Dec 30, 2017 1:37 pm


Situations
33% of all motorcycle fatalities occurred in intersections
38% of all motorcycle fatalities occurred at night
17% of motorcycle fatalities occurred on freeway/expressways. 51% occurred on principal and minor arterial roads.
74% of motorcycle crashes were frontal collisions - i.e. the motorcyclist's fault.
24% of the fatal motorcycle crashes were with stationary objects.
41% of the fatal motorcycle crashes involved a vehicle turning left in front of the motorcycle.
33% of fatal motorcycle crashes involved speeding.
Some of those numbers don't add up in my mind. If 17% occurred on freeways and 51% on other roads, where did the rest happen? Does this include off road bikes?
If 74% of frontal collisions were the riders fault and 41% were vehicles turning left in front of them, 15% were not the one doing the left turns fault? Maybe some of those speeders were determined at fault in those cases. Maybe if I read the whole article it would become clear but I get bored and lost in long statistical articles.
I caught those miss statements also.
What they did not do, is to properly look at the Grammar of their text.

51% of the 17% noted, were on "other roads"

74% of the frontal collisions, 41% of them were due to Left Turns by other vehicles.


John
'02 Gl1800 Hot Rod Yellow,
daughter named her Big Bird :lol:
http://www.goldwingfacts.com

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