CB Channel


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winger05
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CB Channel

Postby winger05 » Fri Jun 03, 2011 9:21 pm



What cb channel do most wing riders use? I pass a lot of wings on the interstates, but can't seem to contact anyone on the cb. I try going trough all 40 channels, but don't ever here anyone on wings.



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Re: CB Channel

Postby macka » Sat Jun 04, 2011 5:24 am

I use 19 because its the general CB call channel and truckers are on it.

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Re: CB Channel

Postby WingAdmin » Sat Jun 04, 2011 10:36 am

I sit on 19, it's the best place to find out about the speed traps ahead, because the truckers all tell each other. If you talk nice to them, they'll tell you, too.

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Re: CB Channel

Postby winger05 » Sat Jun 04, 2011 11:47 am

Thanks guys for the replies. I guess channel 19 would make the most sense for the things you mentioned. I thought maybe there was a channel that was common to just us wing riders so that we could just say "hey" out the road. 19 is always so busy that you can't hardly get a word in over all the chatter from the truckers and such. It would be neat to have a channel just for us wingers to chat on.

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tims
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Re: CB Channel

Postby tims » Sat Jun 04, 2011 7:28 pm

Our group always uses channel 1 as does a lot of Goldwing groups

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Re: CB Channel

Postby RoadRogue » Sun Jun 05, 2011 2:17 am

I switch between 19 and 1, even though the CB doesnt get much use in the mountains around here.I keep it on just in case.
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Re: CB Channel

Postby joe c » Sun Jun 05, 2011 5:50 am

Channel one is used by many Wingers. Not all Wingers, but many.

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Re: CB Channel

Postby winger05 » Sun Jun 05, 2011 11:04 am

Great!! Channel 1 it is. Thanks for all the input.

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Re: CB Channel

Postby WingAdmin » Mon Jun 06, 2011 2:45 pm

Keep in mind that most CB antenna installations are tuned for maximum SWR on channel 19, because it is right in the middle of the band, so you will get maximum range on that channel. Probably why the truckers use it? Conversely, the farther away from 19 you get, the less range you get, so channels 1 and 40 will have the least amount of output (unless you decided to tune your antenna for maximum SWR for those channels).

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Re: CB Channel

Postby winger05 » Tue Jun 07, 2011 12:15 am

WingAdmin wrote:Keep in mind that most CB antenna installations are tuned for maximum SWR on channel 19, because it is right in the middle of the band, so you will get maximum range on that channel. Probably why the truckers use it? Conversely, the farther away from 19 you get, the less range you get, so channels 1 and 40 will have the least amount of output (unless you decided to tune your antenna for maximum SWR for those channels).


Wow!, I didn't realize that. I guess you do learn something new once in a while. What kind of range are we talking about? 1 mile or maybe 2 on level ground? and even less in the mountains?

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Re: CB Channel

Postby dingdong » Tue Jun 07, 2011 9:26 am

Everyone I know uses channel 2. I never leave mine on unless I am riding with someone though. Every time it receives a transmission it scares the h*** out of me. If there is traffic congestion I turn it on to listen to the truckers, then it's on channel 19.
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Re: CB Channel

Postby WingAdmin » Tue Jun 07, 2011 9:27 am

winger05 wrote:Wow!, I didn't realize that. I guess you do learn something new once in a while. What kind of range are we talking about? 1 mile or maybe 2 on level ground? and even less in the mountains?


Usable range on my bike CB is about 2-3 miles transmitting, maybe 3-4 miles receiving, on reasonably flat terrain. CB is line-of-sight, so hills will obscure the signal, as will large buildings, power lines, etc.

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Re: CB Channel

Postby winger05 » Tue Jun 07, 2011 10:07 pm

dingdong wrote:Everyone I know uses channel 2. I never leave mine on unless I am riding with someone though. Every time it receives a transmission it scares the h*** out of me. If there is traffic congestion I turn it on to listen to the truckers, then it's on channel 19.


That's what I do as well since I can never raise any wingers when I am out on the road.

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Re: CB Channel

Postby winger05 » Tue Jun 07, 2011 10:11 pm

WingAdmin wrote:
winger05 wrote:Wow!, I didn't realize that. I guess you do learn something new once in a while. What kind of range are we talking about? 1 mile or maybe 2 on level ground? and even less in the mountains?


Usable range on my bike CB is about 2-3 miles transmitting, maybe 3-4 miles receiving, on reasonably flat terrain. CB is line-of-sight, so hills will obscure the signal, as will large buildings, power lines, etc.


That's actually further then I figured. I live in Arizona and most of my rides are in mountainous terrain, so I guess I will not have very good CB range.

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Re: CB Channel

Postby macka » Wed Jun 08, 2011 7:25 am

get a HAM license, you can use a much more powerful radio, and use your CB as needed.

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Re: CB Channel

Postby lhelber » Tue Jun 14, 2011 11:05 am

While riding solo or in my truck I run on channel 19. Anytime I am out with fellow Wingers we are on channel 1. I have hailed many other Wings on channel 1 while traveling. In a recient "Road Captains" course they recommended that you run on channel 1 with subsequent groups running 2 channels up (ie the next group would run on channel 3). Channel 9 is still the emergency channel so don't use it unless you have a real emergency.

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Re: CB Channel

Postby winger05 » Tue Jun 14, 2011 11:25 am

lhelber wrote:While riding solo or in my truck I run on channel 19. Anytime I am out with fellow Wingers we are on channel 1. I have hailed many other Wings on channel 1 while traveling. In a recient "Road Captains" course they recommended that you run on channel 1 with subsequent groups running 2 channels up (ie the next group would run on channel 3). Channel 9 is still the emergency channel so don't use it unless you have a real emergency.


Very good information. Thanks!!

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Re: CB Channel

Postby patton57 » Fri Jun 17, 2011 6:49 pm

WingAdmin wrote:Keep in mind that most CB antenna installations are tuned for maximum SWR on channel 19, because it is right in the middle of the band, so you will get maximum range on that channel. Probably why the truckers use it? Conversely, the farther away from 19 you get, the less range you get, so channels 1 and 40 will have the least amount of output (unless you decided to tune your antenna for maximum SWR for those channels).


Truckers started using channel 19 as the standard back when CB was limited to 23 channels, so being in the middle doesn't cut it. Anyone know why 19 became the norm?

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Re: CB Channel

Postby WingAdmin » Fri Jun 17, 2011 7:06 pm

I looked it up. From Wikipedia:

Originally, there were only 23 CB channels in the U.S.; the present 40-channel bandplan did not come along until 1977. Channel 9 was officially reserved for emergency use by the FCC in 1969. Channel 10 was often used for highway communications at first, then, it was Channel 10 east of the Mississippi River, and channel 19 west of the Mississippi; then later Channel 19 became the preferred highway channel in most areas, as it did not have adjacent-channel interference problems with channel 9. Many CB'ers called Channel 19 "the trucker's channel". While it does not have any official status, such as Channel 9, most highway travelers listen to Channel 19. It is still used by truck drivers, and therefore remains the best way to hear information regarding road construction, accidents, and police radar traps.

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Re: CB Channel

Postby vtxcandyred » Fri Jun 17, 2011 8:14 pm

I use 19 on the road and 22 around home, but I have a base station set up to chat with mama and whoever else is on. It can get pretty chatty at times. Tou want to stay away from 15,17 and the upper five 35-40. 35-40 usually has a lot of skippers on and 15 and 17 is about the same.

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Re: CB Channel

Postby waldburger56 » Wed Jun 22, 2011 11:28 am

Okay, here is the poop on the channels of the CB. I just stepped out of the cab and into semi retirement the end of May, so this is as current as I can give you!

Even numbered Interstate Highways, ei: I-10. I-20, I-40, etc. the busy channel is #19
Odd numbered Interstates, such as I-5, I-17, and the like, the busy channel is #17
The exception to the rule in California is on I-5 from Bakersfield (approximate) to , and while in L.A. the channel switches to #15
Most US Highways, ie: US6, US99, US395 the trucks are on #19

I could suggest everyone get their HAM license and everyone use 2 meter radios on their GWs, (I have my license and I am already trying to come up with a compact 2 meter install) But that is better left to a different post! I hope this helps those who were wondering where all the truckers were. Oh, and as a side note, a lot of us leave the CB's shut off unless we need some specific information due to the high amount of senseless noise and filth being transmitted by people with less than half a teaspoon of common sense.

Jeff
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ka9nyn
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Re: CB Channel

Postby ka9nyn » Thu Jun 23, 2011 6:47 pm

WingAdmin wrote:Keep in mind that most CB antenna installations are tuned for maximum SWR on channel 19, because it is right in the middle of the band, so you will get maximum range on that channel. Probably why the truckers use it? Conversely, the farther away from 19 you get, the less range you get, so channels 1 and 40 will have the least amount of output (unless you decided to tune your antenna for maximum SWR for those channels).


I think you mean't "minimum SWR" as minimum SWR means most power is being coupled to the antenna.
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Re: CB Channel

Postby WingAdmin » Sat Jun 25, 2011 10:44 pm

ka9nyn wrote:I think you mean't "minimum SWR" as minimum SWR means most power is being coupled to the antenna.


oops! You're right, I meant maximum radiated output, which is accomplished with minimum SWR. Amazing that nobody else caught that!!

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Re: CB Channel

Postby 2008retiredplb » Thu Jun 30, 2011 8:59 am

I agree that most of the time there is way to much traffic on many of the channels. When I ride in a group, I keep the squelch fairly high (15 and over) to cut out some of the noise. If the group gets spread out or in a lot of curves, I lower the squelch a little until I can hear those I want to hear.
To bad we can't get a little more transmit power on these radios. I would like to be able to get 3 to 5 miles range most of the time but generally I can only get 1 or 2 miles.
"Love to ride and ride to love"

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Re: CB Channel

Postby waldburger56 » Thu Jun 30, 2011 11:28 am

The problem with lack of range most of the time with C.B. radios is not that the radios are under powered, but rather the installation of the equipment, ei: antenna(s) Ground plane, RF ground, physical placement of the antenna(s) as well as local terrain have a lot to do with the ability to "get out" on a radio.

A transmitter is only as good as it's antenna, plain and simple. the better the antenna, along with the lowest SWR you can achieve is your safest bet to getting more transmitting range out of your C.B. Buy the best antenna you can afford! Make sure that the shielded side of the coax is well grounded thru the mount to the frame of the motorcycle, and make sure the radio chassis is grounded well to the frame also. DO NOT DEPEND ON THE NEGITIVE (BLACK) WIRE COMING FROM THE RADIO AS A CHASSIS GROUND! While the black wire serves as an electrical ground, and will work to provide an antenna ground, it is far better to run a braided grounding strap from one of the mounting screws to the chassis of the motorcycle, especially if the mounting bracket holding the radio is mounted to a non metal surface such as a plastic or fiberglass part of a fairing!

Keep coax cable runs as short as possible, as you will lose power to the antenna thru long runs of coax. (This is not likely on motorcycles due to the size of the vehicle, but always remember, the shorter the better) Use the biggest and best quality coax you can afford, and use solder on PL259 connectors, not, I repeat NOT crimp ons!!!

There is not much you can do to improve your transmit/receive quality in mountains or heavy forests on winding roads, these conditions block or absorb RF. Remember, radio signals are "line of sight" except in rare instances of "skip" but that is way beyond the scope of this post. It is possible to talk/hear another station in a group of riders within +-2 miles even in the heaviest mountains/forest switchbacks with a properly tuned antenna.

I hope this is helpful to those seeking a little info on C.B.

Jeff, KG6GBY
Portland, Oregon




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