How to remove and replace your water pump


Step-by-step tutorials on how to maintain and fix your GL1100
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WingAdmin
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Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 4:16 pm
Location: Strongsville, OH
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1982 GL1100A Aspencade (sold)
1989 PC800 (wife's!)
1998 XV250 Virago (sold)
2007 Aspen Sentry Trailer

How to remove and replace your water pump

Postby WingAdmin » Mon Jul 27, 2009 11:24 pm



Changing the water pump on your Goldwing is a somewhat involved process, but with careful attention and adhering to procedures, it is a task easily done by the home DIY mechanic with basic tools. I would recommend that you first read through this entire set of instructions before starting the task. While the procedures and pictures here apply to the GL1100A Aspencade, they are very similar to that used for both the GL1000 and GL1200.

1. The first indication that the water pump is in need of replacement occurs when the motorcycle is first started, and is warming up.

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2. At the front of the motorcycle, you will notice drips of coolant, (less commonly) oil, or a mixture of both.

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3. The drips come from the "weep hole" in the bottom of the water pump case. This hole allows coolant that has gotten past the water pump seal to exit the case rather than being forced into the crankcase oil. Honda manuals also call this the "telltale hole" for obvious reasons.

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4. You will require a replacement water pump. They are commonly available via mail-order parts suppliers. Cyclemax keeps them in stock for instant shipping, and at a good price. It is possible to rebuild an existing water pump with new bearings, but success is not guaranteed - and if the bearings have been exposed to coolant for long enough, the movement of the water pump shaft may have caused other damage as well. I chose to install a brand new pump. Note: This is not the place to go cheap - use a genuine OEM Honda water pump ONLY! Aftermarket water pumps, in particular from one low-quality online aftermarket parts supplier (ahem, rhymes with "labor cycle"), are well known to fail after only a few months of operation. Trust me, you don't want to be redoing this job in a few months because you saved $20 on a water pump!

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5. You will also need a water pump gasket and seal kit. This looks scary because of all the parts, but once you get things apart, you'll see they all have their places, and it's not that hard to do. They can be found in several places on the web. Cyclemax now carries a GL1000/GL1100/GL1200 Water Pump Gasket Kit.

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6. You will be draining and changing the oil as part of this process, so you should have a replacement oil filter, with the appropriate O-rings.

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7. For leak testing (and to flush the coolant system) you will be using a gallon jug of DISTILLED water. Make sure it is distilled - you don't want to be depositing minerals from spring or tap water in your cooling system.

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8. You will need four quarts of engine oil. This is the brand and type I use, you can use whatever brand and type you decide is best for your motorcycle.

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9. Lastly, you will need four quarts of engine coolant. This is one of the places where I prefer to use Honda fluids rather than cheaper aftermarket equivalents. Whatever type you choose to use, make SURE it is SILICATE FREE. Coolant with silicates will quickly destroy your new water pump.

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10. To begin, put the motorcycle on its center stand, and remove the oil drain bolt. My motorcycle has an aftermarket dipstick, so I remove the cinch bolt holding the dipstick in place.

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11. Allow the oil to drain into your oil drain pan.

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12. While the oil is draining, loosen the bolt holding the oil filter housing.

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13. As you loosen the oil filter housing, oil will begin to drain from between the housing and the engine cover - be prepared for it!

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14. Continue to loosen the bolt on the oil filter housing.

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15. Remove the oil filter housing, containing the oil filter.

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16. Remove and discard the oil filter from the oil filter housing.

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17. Remove, but do not discard the washer and oil filter spring. The washer sits between the spring and the filter. This washer is easy lost, because it commonly sticks to the oil filter, and is accidentally discarded.

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18. Remove the center fitting from the oil filter housing.

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19. Note the O-ring on the center fitting.

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20. Remove the O-ring from the center fitting, and discard it. Be careful not to scratch or damage the center fitting.

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21. Remove the O-ring from the oil filter housing and discard it.

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22. Loosen the coolant drain bolt slowly. The engine should be relatively cool before doing this. DO NOT remove this bolt if the engine is hot! Scalding hot coolant and steam will spray out, causing severe burns!

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23. Allow the coolant to drain.

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24. While you are waiting for the oil and coolant to fully drain, start to remove the seat. Remove the lids of the pannier (side) bags. Note that there is an indentation in the plastic of the bags that allows a socket wrench extension or hex screwdriver to be positioned to remove the fasteners on either side of the seat.

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25. Remove the adjuster on the left side, and the fastener on the right side of the seat.

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26. Pull the seat back, lifting the rear of the seat, until the tab in the front clears the retaining channel, then lift the seat up and away from the motorcycle.

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27. Remove the two bolts holding the back of the false tank to the motorcycle frame crossmember.

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28. Remove the three screws holding each fairing lower panel in place, then remove the fairing lower panel by pulling it out and to the rear.

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29. Looking in through the side of the motorcycle where the fairing lowers normally go, you will see two bolts recessed in a few inches, almost directly above the radiator. Using a socket extension, reach into the space exposed by the fairing lower panels, immediately below the fairing, and remove the bolts holding the front of the false tank to the motorcycle frame (one on each side).

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If your motorcycle does not have air suspension installed, then skip forward to step 40: steps 30 through 39 involve disconnecting the air suspension before removing the false tank.

30. Put a wrench on the smaller of the two nuts on the hose fitting on the top of the right shock.

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31. Put a larger wrench on the larger of the two nuts. The smaller wrench is not shown in this picture, for clarity. While holding the smaller wrench still (preventing the smaller nut from moving), loosen the larger nut. After a turn or so, it should be able to be removed with your fingers. Unscrew it and pull the hose away from the fork fitting.

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32. Remove the right side cover and repeat the same removal procedure on the rear suspension air fitting.

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33. Open the false tank lid. Remove the banjo fitting from the top left of the compressor. Don't lose the O-ring!

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34. Remove the left rearmost fitting from the bottom of the air suspension control panel, under the tank lid. Again, don't lose the O-ring!

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35. Disconnect the air compressor power plug.

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36. Pull the air compressor up and out of the false tank.

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37. Pull the rear suspension air hose out of the frame and up through the middle of the false tank.

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38. Ensure the front suspension air hose is clear of any obstruction.

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39. Disconnect all four wire bullet connectors leading to the air suspension control panel. Don't worry - all the wires are different colors, so you can't mix them up on reassembly. Make sure you pull on the connectors to disconnect them, not the wires.

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40. Gently pull the back of false tank up slightly, then to the rear of the motorcycle, and lastly pull it up and away from the motorcycle. Set it down on something soft to avoid chipping or scratching the paint.

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41. Loosen, then remove the radiator fill cap.

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42. Loosen the lower radiator hose compression fitting.

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43. Loosen the lower radiator hose from the water pump outlet.

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44. Pull the lower radiator hose up and away from the water pump outlet.

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45. Loosen the upper radiator hose compression fitting.

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46. Pull the upper radiator hose up and away from the thermostat fitting.

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47. Reach in and disconnect the radiator fan connector. This is a tricky procedure and has to be done with the fingers of one hand. Small hands and dexterity helps. Like most of electrical connectors, it has a lock that has to be pressed in on one side before the connector is pulled apart. There is a small metal tab holding some of the wire to the radiator fan frame - pulling the wire out from this tab will give you some more leeway to help disconnect this connector.

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48. If the horns are mounted on the front horn tabs in front of the radiator, disconnect and remove them.

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49. Remove the acorn nuts holding the radiator grill in place.

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50. Pull the radiator grill away from the radiator.

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51. Whenever possible, I like to replace the fasteners on the bolts or studs that they normally occupy - it helps me keep track of which fastener goes where, and keeps me from losing them inadvertently.

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52. Remove the two lower radiator mounting bolts, and pull away the lower radiator bracket.

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53. Remove the two upper radiator mounting nuts.

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54. To easily remove the radiator, the horn mounting brackets need to be bent forward. I use a crescent wrench to do this, to keep the brackets straight while bending them away.

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55. You can see both brackets bent forward. I later decided this was a stupid thing to have to do every time I wanted to remove the radiator, so I moved my horns inside the fairing lower covers (there are threaded mounting holes there for them), and broke these tabs off completely. I then painted the metal where the tabs broke off, to ensure it would not rust.

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56. Turn the front wheel all the way to the left, to give clearance to remove the radiator.

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57. Pull the radiator forward.

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58. Pull both sides of the radiator forward, so that they clear the studs.

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59. Remove both hoses from their fittings on the top of the coolant reservoir.

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60. Remove the lower bolt holding the reservoir in place.

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61. Pull the reservoir to the rear, and remove it.

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62. Remove the black overflow hose from the radiator filler neck, and ensure any control cables are not jammed underneath it. Make sure the radiator filler neck will easily drop through its access hole.

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63. Pull the bottom of the radiator forward, then pull the radiator directly forward and off of the top studs. The radiator will come away from the motorcycle.

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64. Here is the small metal tab that normally retains the radiator fan connector wire.

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64a. It's always a good idea to examine the condition of your radiator hoses. To do so, you need to first remove the coil spring hose protectors from the hoses:

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64b. If your radiator hoses are aged, have a soft spot, are hardened and brittle, or have bulging areas, it is time to replace them. Replacement radiator hoses can be made from a single NAPA NBH7733 radiator hose.

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64c. Line up the NAPA hose next to the old hoses and cut it in half, matching the length and curve of the old hoses. Place the new hoses on the radiator, tighten them in place, then slide the protective coils over them.

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65. Remove the bolts holding the fan to the radiator, and pull the fan away from the radiator.

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66. Using a small screwdriver, gently straighten any radiator fins that are bent, impeding air flow. If you're going to the trouble of fixing your water pump, you might as well have your cooling system in top shape! When finished, reinstall the fan onto the radiator. Of course, if your radiator is already in perfect shape, you can skip steps 65 and 66.

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67. This is a picture of the engine front cover. Note the 13 screws that must be removed - there are quite a few different lengths (shown in green). This is a chart to help you keep them straight. The correct length screws MUST be replaced in the correct holes when reinstalling!

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68. Loosen the screws in the order shown (in red) in the above picture. First loosen #1 a turn, then loosen #2 a turn, and so on. When you've gone through them all, start over again at #1, and loosen it a turn again, and so on. After you've done this twice, you can remove all of the screws in sequence.

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69. Note that there are many different sizes of screws. Keep a measuring tape handy so that you can put the correct screw in the correct place when reassembling!

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70. All of the screws except this one can be completely removed. This one cannot be removed because of its position behind the frame. Loosen it, and leave it hanging out as shown.

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71. Below and to the left of the oil filter fitting is a small tab, as shown.

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72. From behind, put a large, blunt flat-blade screwdriver or drift against this tab, and strike the screwdriver with a mallet, to break the engine cover free from the engine block. Once the cover has broken free, wiggle it back and forth while pulling it towards the front of the motorcycle, until it comes free. DO NOT under any circumstance shove any kind of tool between the engine block and the engine cover to try to pry them apart! Both pieces are made of soft aluminum, and any kind of nick or dent made in the edges by a pry tool will cause future leaks!

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73. Pull the engine cover away, and allow the remaining oil to drain out. Be careful of the wire that will still be attached (82-83 only).

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74. This is the inside view of the engine cover. Note that the 1980 and 1981 models do not have the neutral switch in the front cover.

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75. This is the inside view of the front of the engine.

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76. For 1980-1981 models, skip to step 80. Remove the two bolts holding the neutral switch into the engine cover. Gently pry the neutral switch tabs out of the casing.

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77. Remove the bolt holding the neutral switch wire stay, and the stay itself.

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78. Gently pull the rubber grommet out and away from the engine cover.

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79. Place the neutral switch where it will not be damaged.

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80. The engine cover will have a lot of dirt and sludge in it that will need to be cleaned out.

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81. This is the weep hole on the bottom of the water pump case.

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82. Remove the three bolts holding the water pump in place.

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83. Each bolt has an aluminum crush washer. Your gasket/seal kit should have replacement washers - remove and throw the old ones away.

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84. A crush washer may have stuck to the inside of the engine cover. Very gently (without nicking the engine cover) pry the washer away from the cover.

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85. Pull the water pump housing away from the engine cover. A couple of gentle taps from a rubber mallet may be required to break the old gasket seal.

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86. Inside you will see the business end of the water pump. The original Honda water pumps had plastic impellers. Replacement water pumps have metal impellers.

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87. The water pump has two O-rings on it. The larger of the two prevents coolant from leaking around the pump, and the smaller prevents oil from leaking around the pump from the engine side. The weep hole is located between the two. There is also a weep hole in the pump housing itself, that allows coolant or oil that has seeped through the bearings and seals of the pump to exit the pump, and subsequently out the engine through the weep hole in the water pump case.

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88. Apply gasket remover to the mating surfaces on the engine cover and water pump housing. Allow the remover to sit as required by the manufacturer of the gasket remover.

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89. Very gently, using a steel chisel, remove the large chunks of gasket from the mating surfaces. It is extremely important that you do not gouge, nick or scratch the mating surfaces - so hold the chisel as flat as possible, as shown in this picture.

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90. After the large chunks of gasket have been removed, clean any remaining residue using the abrasive side of a Scotchbrite sponge. This is abrasive enough to remove the residue, but not abrasive enough to damage the aluminum. A note: It took me almost two hours to fully clean all of the old gasket material when I performed this procedure! Take your time and do it right.

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91. When complete, the piece should look shiny and new, and no trace of residue from the original gasket should be evident. I find that brake cleaner and a toothbrush works extremely well at removing grime and oily residue from metal pieces.

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92. Note that on the engine cover, there is what appears to be gasket residue surrounding the coolant channel holes in the upper left and right corners - this is in fact stain remaining from rubber O-rings. It would not come off - and not wanting to damage the aluminum, I decided not to try any further. The surface was smooth, which is all that really matters.

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93. Repeat the procedure on the gasket remnants on the front of the engine. Be careful with the gasket remover - try not to get it in the coolant or oil channels. Similarly, when using the Scotchbrite sponge, you will notice that it creates a large amount of gritty residue. It is critically important that this residue NOT get into the engine, as it will do terrible things to bearings. Flush liberally and often with copious amounts of brake cleaner to keep everything clean. I recommend the wearing of safety glasses to prevent the inevitable splashing of brake cleaner from getting into your eyes. It hurts, and can damage your eyes!

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94. Remove the old O-rings from the various channels and dowels on the engine face.

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95. With a blunt point, clean out the residue and grime from the O-ring channels on the engine face.

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96. From your gasket/seal kit, install the small and large O-rings on the new water pump.

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97. Lubricate both O-rings liberally with ATF (my favorite), oil, Crisco or Vaseline. Lubricate the well in the engine cover where the oil pump will be installed as well.

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98. VERY gently insert the new water pump into the engine cover. It will only go one way. It is CRITICALLY important that the pump go in evenly and gently, and that the O-rings do not kink, roll over, or otherwise do anything other than seal against the inside of the engine cover. If you make a mistake here, your pump will leak, and you won't find out until you've got almost EVERYTHING put back together. Ask me how I know. :)

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99. Put new aluminum crush washers from your gasket/seal kit on the water pump bolts.

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100. Insert the bolts into the back of the engine case and into the water pump. Tighten all three by hand. Then tighten them in turn - turn the one on the left a turn, then the one on the right a turn, then the one in the middle. Repeat this process until all three are tight. Torque all three bolts to 9 ft-lbs.

*** Important: It is important that these bolts are torqued correctly, and that NEW crush washers are used. These washers seal the engine oil from the pump - if old crush washers are reused, or bolts are incorrectly torqued, engine oil can migrate past these bolts and into the water pump area, where it will then drip out of the weep hole.

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101. From your gasket/seal kit, place the new water pump gasket on the engine cover. If you have trouble keeping the gasket in place, use some Vaseline to stick it in place.

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102. Place the water pump housing onto the engine cover, fitting it down onto the dowels. Ensure the gasket does not move, or get pinched.

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103. Insert this 1 inch screw into this hole on the top of the water pump housing, and tighten FINGER TIGHT - just enough to hold the housing in place.

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104. The engine cover should look like this. Note that there are two bolts on the very front of the water pump housing that you never removed - they hold the discharge fitting to the water pump housing. If this was not leaking, there is no reason to remove it. If you did not remove it, keep in mind that you will have an O-ring left over when you are finished. If you did remove either of these bolts, you will need to remove this piece, remove the old O-ring, and replace it with the new one before replacing the two bolts.

Helpful hint: To check for leaks at this point, fill the water pump with water (pour it in the hose fitting on the front). Put your thumb over the coolant drain hole, another thumb over the coolant supply hole on the back, and blow hard into the hose fitting on the front (use your mouth - not compressed air!) and watch for water dripping out of the weep hole. If you see some - your O-rings are leaking.

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105. On the front of the engine, insert a screwdriver gently into the oil shaft seal, and pry the old seal out. Be careful not to nick or damage the aluminum block holding the seal in place.

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106. From your seal/gasket kit, insert and press the new seal into the oil seal cavity, making sure it is fully inserted and flat.

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107. Replace any channels that were removed from the engine block.

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108. Replace all old O-rings with new O-rings from your gasket/seal kit. I recommend using a small amount of Vaseline on each O-ring to hold it in place.

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109. Here are all the O-rings that you should have replaced (there should be no O-ring at #3). Note that when I removed my engine cover, one of the dowels (shown as #3 in this picture) pulled out of the block and stayed in the engine cover, which is why it is missing from this picture.

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110. For 1980-1981 models, skip to step 118. Press the neutral switch into place, and install and tighten both bolts.

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111. Install the wire stay and the case grommet.

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112. For the next step, you will need a piece of wire, a couple feet long, and some electrical tape. Strip about an inch of wire from both ends of the wire.

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113. Using the electrical tape, tape one end of the wire to the side of the engine cover.

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114. Tape the other end of the wire to a grounded part of the motorcycle - in this picture, I used one of the crash bars.

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115. Note that the neutral switch has a small bar that can rotate on a shaft. This is turned by the shifter, and when the shifter is in neutral, the neutral switch completes the circuit to ground.

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116. Turn the key to "ON" (DON'T START THE MOTORCYCLE!! - Remember, it has no coolant or oil in it!). If the neutral light does not come on, then rotate the bar on the neutral switch slowly until it turns on. Turn the key off.

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117. This is the part of the shifter that engages the bar on the neutral switch. Ensure the transmission of the motorcycle is in neutral!

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118. This is the shaft end of the water pump. It has a slot that engages the output shaft of the oil pump.

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119. Looking into the oil seal, you can see the position of the output shaft. It is important that the water pump shaft be rotated so that it approximates the position of the oil pump output shaft, so that when the pieces are mated together, the shaft will engage properly.

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120. Remember when I mentioned the dowel that came out of my engine block, and stayed in the engine cover instead?

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121. I inserted one of the bolts into the dowel (to ensure it didn't get bent or deformed), then wiggled it until it was freed from the engine cover. I then inserted it into the engine block, along with the O-ring from the gasket/seal kit. You may or may not have to do this, depending on whether the dowels all stay in the engine block or not.

Note: This picture shows an O-ring around this dowel - this is incorrect, there should be NO O-ring on this dowel. There is only ONE dowel that requires an O-ring, and it is the one shown as #4 in step 109, directly above the shifter arm.

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122. This is the engine cover, ready to install, with the dowel removed, and the neutral switch and water pump positioned correctly. Note: the neutral switch is not located in the front cover on 1980-1981 models.

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123. Place the new gasket on the engine block. Use Vaseline to stick the gasket to the block in places where it does not want to stay. You don't need a lot - just enough to hold it in place. That, along with the dowels, should keep it in place.

Note: I have had a couple people ask if they can use RTV, "liquid gasket" or other gasket replacement product in place of this gasket. The answer is no: The gasket holds the engine cover away from the engine about 0.5mm - without this gasket in place, the shifter mechanism binds against the inside of the engine cover, and you won't be able to shift gears. This gasket is necessary!

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124. Insert the 3 inch bolt into the engine cover. Remember, this is the one that can't be inserted or removed because of frame clearance. You don't want to install the cover, and then realize that you have to uninstall it all again, because you forgot to insert this bolt beforehand!

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125. Very gently, push the engine cover up into place, about an inch away from the engine block, and then push it directly back and onto the engine block, allowing the dowels to position the block correctly. While holding the engine cover in place, screw the 3 inch bolt in by hand. This will hold the cover in place and keep it from falling off.

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126. I find it is very helpful to have a "wobble" extension for your socket wrench. This allows you to tighten bolts at an angle, and while not essential for this job, makes it a lot easier.

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127. For 1980-1981 models, skip to step 130. Ensure the neutral switch wire exits the cover through the small indentation on the top right side of the motorcycle.

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128. The bolt right below that indentation holds the J-clamp that holds the wire in place. Insert the rest of the bolts by hand, and tighten only finger-tight.

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129. Turn the key switch on, and confirm the operation of the neutral switch. Try shifting in and out of neutral. You don't want to have to disassemble everything just because you got this wrong!

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130. Tighten the bolts in the order shown. Tighten one turn at a time, then move to the next bolt, finally returning to the first bolt, before repeating the sequence once more. When all the bolts have been tightened to 9 ft-lbs, you are done.

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131. From your gasket/seal kit, install the new crush washer on the coolant drain bolt.

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132. Install and tighten the coolant drain bolt.

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133. Install the upper radiator retaining bracket on the radiator.

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134. Notice I modified my bracket by bending over the edge. This makes it a lot easier to install, and does not affect the functionality at all.

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135. Lift the radiator into place, and push the upper studs through the rubber bushings.

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136. Ensure the radiator filler neck comes up properly through its opening.

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137. Push the radiator top bracket into place until the studs emerge, and install the washers and nuts.

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138. I have had problems with these nuts loosening in the past, so I use blue Loctite thread-locker on them.

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139. Reconnect and tighten the radiator lower and upper hoses.

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140. Reconnect the fan connector.

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141. Make sure after the fan is connected, that the wire is fastened in place to the fan frame. Turn the fan blades by hand to ensure that they turn freely, and that no wires, hoses or other objects will impede their rotation.

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142. Place the lower radiator bracket in place, and HAND TIGHTEN the bolts holding it on.

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143. Reinstall the radiator grille.

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144. Install the oil drain plug (or in my case, the oil dipstick).

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145. Bend the horn brackets back to their original position.

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146. Install and connect the horns.

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147. Connect the black hose to the radiator filler neck overflow.

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148. Ensure the hose is lifted above the level of the radiator neck.

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149. Insert your funnel into the radiator filler, and fill the radiator with distilled water.

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150. Open the oil filler cap. Mine is always hard to open, but a Crescent wrench does the job without marking it up.

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151. Open the new oil filter, and extract the new O-rings.

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152. Apply clean oil to the large O-ring, and insert it into the channel on the oil filter housing.

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153. Apply clean oil to the small O-ring and slide it up the inner fastener and into its channel.

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154. Insert the inner fastener into the oil filter housing.

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155. Place the spring onto the inner fastener.

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156. Place the washer on top of the spring.

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157. Apply clean oil to the rubber bushings at either end of the oil filter, and slide it onto the inner fastener.

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158. Ensure the new oil filter mounting face is clean, and apply a film of clean oil to it.

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159. Place the filter housing against the cover.

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160. Push it in place while turning the fastener bolt by hand, to engage the threads.

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161. Ensure the two notches on the oil filter housing are on either side of the notch on the engine cover. This keeps the oil filter from accidentally coming loose during riding.

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162. Tighten the bolt on the oil filter housing.

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163. Insert a funnel into the oil filler, and pour oil into the funnel. You will need approximately 3 1/2 quarts. Don't try to do this without a funnel - any spills will drip directly onto your exhaust pipe, and this will make copious amounts of bad-smelling smoke the next time you start your motorcycle!

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164. Watch the oil level indicator.

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165. You should fill the crankcase with oil until it shows at the "full" line as shown here, and no further. If the window on your indicator is too dirty, put a small screwdriver on the flat screw in the middle, and turn it - this will operate a wiper on the inside of the window, which will clean the dirt away.

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166. Install and tighten the oil filler cap.

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167. Check for leaks. There should (obviously) be no water or oil leaking out.

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168. Reinstall the coolant reservoir.

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169. Tighten the bolt fastening the coolant reservoir to the motorcycle frame.

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170. Refasten the hoses to the coolant reservoir - black hose to the rightmost connector, orange hose to the remaining connector.

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171. Start up your motorcycle!

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172. As the motorcycle runs, it will expel air from the coolant system, in the form of bubbles through the radiator neck. As it does, the water level will drop. It is important that you continue filling the radiator with distilled water as it does this. As the water level drops, fill it back up with more water. Rev the engine a few times to make sure all the air is expelled. Revving the engine will make the water level drop, but it should rise right back up to the filler neck as the engine returns to idle. If it doesn't rise back up, add more water.

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173. Once no more bubbles appear, install and tighten the radiator cap. Allow the motorcycle to idle for a one or two minutes more.

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174. Check for leaks once more. Turn the motorcycle off and allow it to cool for ten to fifteen minutes.

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175. Remove the radiator cap. Wear gloves, in case the water is still pressurized and hot.

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176. Loosen the coolant drain bolt. Careful of any water that drips out, as it will be very hot.

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177. Remove the coolant drain bolt. Be very careful! Allow the bolt to drop in your pan! The water that comes out will be very hot, and can scald or burn you very easily!

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178. Once all the water has drained, replace and tighten the coolant drain bolt. If any water has collected in the coolant reservoir, dump it out.

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179. Using the funnel, fill the radiator with coolant. Repeat steps 170 through 172, only this time add coolant as required, instead of distilled water.

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180. Fill the coolant reservoir with coolant.

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181. The reservoir should be filled up to the "FILL" line. Over the next few trips you take on your motorcycle, check this level after the motorcycle has cooled, and top it up as required.

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182. Gently position the tank in place, and allow the front of the tank to move into place before the rear. You may have to spread the tank halves (the tank is made of two halves bolted together) slightly in order to get it to fit correctly.

Image

Ensure the front bolt holes of the tank slide over the outside of the frame mounting tabs, as shown in this picture. In this picture, the tank bolt holes (top) are sliding correctly over (on the outside of) the frame mounting tabs. Make sure this is done on both sides before installing any bolts!

Image

The next few steps are for motorcycles with air suspension. If you do not have air suspension, skip to step 196.

183. Ensure the front air hose comes out the front of the tank.

Image

184. Route the rear air hose underneath the frame, and under the helmet lock...

Image

185. ...and under the engine mount and frame member as shown.

Image

186. Place the rear hose on the fitting, and tighten it finger tight.

Image

187. Holding the smaller nut from moving, tighten the larger nut on the fitting.

Image

188. Perform the same operation to fasten the front hose onto its fitting.

Image

189. Ensure that the front hose is routed correctly next to the fuse block.

Image

190. Reconnect the wires from the compressor control panel. Note each color matches the color of the wire it is connected to.

Image

191. Insert the air compressor into its position under the false tank. Fasten the smaller banjo air fitting to the air compressor. Note the position of the O-rings.

Image

192. Tighten the fitting in place. Note that the hose exits between the two metal protrusions on the air compressor.

Image

193. Fasten and tighten the banjo air fitting to the compressor control panel.

Image

194. Reconnect the power connector for the air compressor.

Image

195. Arrange the compressor and its hoses correctly within the false tank cavity, and close the tank cover.

Image

196. Turn the key switch on, and pressurize the front and rear suspensions to check for proper operation.

Image

197. Insert and start, but do not tighten the two rear bolts holding the false tank in place.

Image

198. A trick for holding nuts or bolts in a socket wrench, when they may fall out: place a piece of a shop towel on the head before inserting it into the socket, and it will be held firm.

Image

199. Insert but do not completely tighten the first of the front two bolts holding the false tank in place. Once the second of the front bolts is in place, all four bolts can then be tightened.

Image

200. Locate the retaining tab at the front of the seat.

Image

201. Locate the seat retention channel at the rear of the false tank.

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202. Fit the seat into place, lift the rear of the seat slightly, and push the seat retaining tab into the retention channel. Slide the seat forward.

Image

203. Replace and tighten the seat fasteners on each side of the seat.

Image

204. Replace the fairing lowers. Insert and tighten the two top screws on each piece, but do not insert the bottom screw.

Image

205. Remember that you only inserted the radiator bottom mounting bolts finger tight? This is because the brackets they hold must be positioned correctly for the bottom screw of the fairing lowers. Move the bracket to line up with the screw hole in the fairing lowers, hold it fast, and tighten the mounting bolts. Insert the screws through the lower into the bracket and tighten.

Image

206. You're done! Go have yourself a cold one, you deserve it!

Image



donk_67
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Re: How to remove and replace your water pump

Postby donk_67 » Tue Jul 28, 2009 10:40 am

This is a very timely article. I'm in the process of replacing my waterpump in my 81 GL 1100. Waiting on new pump and gasket kit currently. I managed to remove the pump without removing the radiator, I hope this doesn't cause problems with the install. You sir have my eternal gratitude. I'm sure this will help me from making blunders along the process. Mahalo!

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Re: How to remove and replace your water pump

Postby WingAdmin » Tue Jul 28, 2009 10:46 am

It is possible to get the engine cover off without removing the radiator - if you unhook the lower water hose and pull the radiator forward, you can do it - but it makes it a lot more difficult removing and reinstalling the cover bolts, maneuvering the cover on and off, as well as cleaning the gasket material off the engine block.

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Re: How to remove and replace your water pump

Postby gumby » Tue Jul 28, 2009 12:03 pm

truly a professional job makes everything easy and well viewable from the repair area. my oil pump seal is not sitting
right maybe 2mm out from the outer lip. the picture you have shows a smaller gallery [base]for seating the oil pump seal. my base [gallery] is really wavy not completely flat, the gasket actually melted into the metal itself making it a
nightmare to remove. it would be easier to remove the oil pump to deal with these probs can this be done? there
are 2 phillips and 2 10mm flange bolts holding the pump on looks easy to do but who knows what lays behind the
pump itself.honda manual does not deal with this.. so whadda ya think?

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Re: How to remove and replace your water pump

Postby WingAdmin » Tue Jul 28, 2009 1:54 pm

gumby wrote:truly a professional job makes everything easy and well viewable from the repair area. my oil pump seal is not sitting
right maybe 2mm out from the outer lip. the picture you have shows a smaller gallery [base]for seating the oil pump seal. my base [gallery] is really wavy not completely flat, the gasket actually melted into the metal itself making it a
nightmare to remove. it would be easier to remove the oil pump to deal with these probs can this be done? there
are 2 phillips and 2 10mm flange bolts holding the pump on looks easy to do but who knows what lays behind the
pump itself.honda manual does not deal with this.. so whadda ya think?


If you look at the Honda Service manual for the GL1100, the oil pump removal and disassembly is covered on pages 8-24 and 8-25. It looks like just the cover can be removed, which would certainly make it easier to deal with. That said, if it is wavy and damaged like you describe, you might want to look into finding a replacement pump on eBay or another used parts supplier, rather than trying to machine what is on there. If you can't get a good tight fitting when the seal is pressed in there, it's likely just going to spin.

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Re: How to remove and replace your water pump

Postby xero66 » Tue Jul 28, 2009 2:44 pm

Good article--- Instructions and pictures.
I've been trying to order an OEM gasket kit and have found that Honda no longer has a kit. You have to order parts individually. Just wondering if anybody knows of a kit that's available. At this point it looks like a real guessing game to make sure you've got what you need.
Van

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Re: How to remove and replace your water pump

Postby gumby » Tue Jul 28, 2009 2:58 pm

well how about aluma weld sparingly of course. have used it in the past and it does work. it would certanely stop
the seal from spinning and would give a tight fit. then in the future i could hunt for a new oil pump cover.
i don't the honda official manual that covers all parts of the bike. so your thoughts on the aluma weld?

thx gumby.

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Re: How to remove and replace your water pump

Postby WingAdmin » Tue Jul 28, 2009 3:10 pm

Sure, I suppose some JB Weld put in there or something to beef up the area, then file or machine it down to the correct diameter. Worth a try, anyway!

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Re: How to remove and replace your water pump

Postby gumby » Tue Jul 28, 2009 3:23 pm

i think putting it around the diameter of the seal would cure all ills is there much pressure in that area? when i removed the tranny cover oil was at the bottom so as long as i don't over weld should be fine. like to do things
right using all correct procedures but in a pinch ya gotta do what ya gotta do. any thoughts on this?

thx again gumby

my hat is off to this well read group.

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Re: How to remove and replace your water pump

Postby WingAdmin » Tue Jul 28, 2009 3:41 pm

It appears to me from the diagram in the service manual that the seal actually seals off the pressurized area of the pump from the front of the engine area. The top of the pump forces oil through the O-ring immediately to the left of the seal, which leads to the oil filter (if I recall correctly). This area looks like it is connected to the same place as that seal, which says to me it is going to be under pressure - not a lot, but at least some. So the seal should be fairly strong.

That said, I have a spare engine, so in your case I'd just pull the one out of my spare and plug it in there. However, if I didn't have that option, I think I'd be doing the same as you - build it up, machine it down as best I could to fit the seal, press it in there, and go with it. If the oil filter is getting well saturated, then you know it's working, because the seal is holding, and the oil is being pumped and forced under pressure through the filter.
Attachments
Oil pump exploded diagrram
Oil pump exploded diagrram

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oharaLTD
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Re: How to remove and replace your water pump

Postby oharaLTD » Tue Jul 28, 2009 5:45 pm

great, great write up. Thanks for sharing your skills and ability.
Previous bikes, 1992 Kawasaki Vulcan 1500, 1985 GL1100 LTD, 1999 V-Star 1100 Custom, 1980 CB750C(hondaline luggage, 900 cams)1986 CB450SC Nighthawk

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Re: How to remove and replace your water pump

Postby xero66 » Wed Jul 29, 2009 4:24 pm

Hello,
I'm in the thick of it now with replacing my water pump and was wondering if you could elaborate on step 109 for me. I'm trying to put together a list of parts to order since you can't buy a kit anymore. I'm having trouble nailing down a number for the "o" rings on numbers 3 and 4 in your picture and on my bike there's no ring on number 3 and I'm wondering if there should be or not. Number 4 is part of the cooling system and the O ring makes sense. Number three is just a bolt hole and I'm wondering if an O ring is needed. Your directions and pictures are awsume and I really appreciate you taking the time to make this available to shade tree's like myself. Thanks to you this process has gone pretty smooth for me except for this little part. Any help would be appreciated.
Thanks again,
Van

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Re: How to remove and replace your water pump

Postby WingAdmin » Wed Jul 29, 2009 5:40 pm

I bought this kit which had all the O-rings and gaskets in it. The O-ring on #3 was identical to the one on #4 - don't know if there is a real reason for it to be there, but there was one, and there's an indentation on the block for one to exist there, plus there was one in the kit, so I put it there.

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Re: How to remove and replace your water pump

Postby xero66 » Wed Jul 29, 2009 8:12 pm

Thanks a lot. This will help a lot.
Van

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Mine is weeping

Postby damianbarna » Sat Sep 26, 2009 12:37 pm

I can hardly wait to do this repair. But I just got the bike running and really would like to take it for a ride before I start this repair. The rate of weeping from the tell tale hole is minimal right now. How long might this condition persist? What is the next stage for this problem? How long might it weep?

Thanks for your anticipated replies.

Damian NJ

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Re: How to remove and replace your water pump

Postby WingAdmin » Sat Sep 26, 2009 12:48 pm

Sometimes it will actually stop weeping after a few rides, as the seals get seated in. It's common for it to actually weep a little bit for the first few hours of operation after replacing, as the seals seat. So go ride! :)

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I'll watch it carefully!

Postby damianbarna » Sat Sep 26, 2009 3:43 pm

I can hardly wait to go for a ride! Looks like this Wednesday. Had a problem with the Title . I'll keep you posted. :D

Thanks for all your hard work and great Forum.

Damian NJ

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Re: How to remove and replace your water pump

Postby WA9FWT » Mon Nov 23, 2009 2:41 pm

I spent over a hour reading all the details, what a great pictorial on this fix. I only have one comment on the cooling fan.
I just had my timing belts replace by a shop,rode home about 10 miles every thing was fine. Next day went for a slow ride around town and the fan kicked in and made such a noise I about jumped out of my seat. If they had turned that fan by hand after installation, they would have caught it before it automatically did and caused damage.Hope it didn't do to much damage.

So guys, make sure you turn that fan after replacing the radiator assy by hand. WA9FWT Phil Love this post and site!!!

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Re: How to remove and replace your water pump

Postby WingAdmin » Mon Nov 23, 2009 3:05 pm

WA9FWT wrote:I spent over a hour reading all the details, what a great pictorial on this fix. I only have one comment on the cooling fan.
I just had my timing belts replace by a shop,rode home about 10 miles every thing was fine. Next day went for a slow ride around town and the fan kicked in and made such a noise I about jumped out of my seat. If they had turned that fan by hand after installation, they would have caught it before it automatically did and caused damage.Hope it didn't do to much damage.

So guys, make sure you turn that fan after replacing the radiator assy by hand. WA9FWT Phil Love this post and site!!!


Excellent idea, I will add that to the text. Thanks!

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Re: How to remove and replace your water pump

Postby CalGoldWingDude » Wed Dec 16, 2009 4:21 am

First, I'd like to thank you for the outstanding pics and instructions on replacing the water pump. Your instructions are really coming in handy as I am about to start on replacing my pump via a new OEM Honda part for my '82 GL1100A, same Wing as yours. Here's my question for you: The vendor sites I have visited state categorically not to use any type of lubricant, solvent, etc. as this would void the warranty for this pump. In other words, they state to only "dry install" the pump. Your instructions mention the use of vaseline, etc. in lubing the O rings...could this be a potential problem, especially in possibly deteriorating the rubber in the O rings? I know that rubber generally does not like petroleum based products. Here is a link to a vendor that has this warning: http://www.saber-cycle.com/store/Cooling1.html

Water pump Goldwing GL1000 GL1100 GL1200 OEM
OEM 19200-MG9-681 water pump for 1975 to 1987. DISCLAIMER: Caution Dry Fit Only. Use of ANY type of liquid, spray, gel lubricant, cleaner or solvent to install will damage internal seals and external O-rings resulting in possible premature pump failure. Use of any of the foregoing voids any replacement claim.
Part Number 19200-MG9-681
$190.00

Please advise at your earliest opportunity.

Thanks!

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Re: How to remove and replace your water pump

Postby WingAdmin » Wed Dec 16, 2009 12:17 pm

CalGoldWingDude wrote:First, I'd like to thank you for the outstanding pics and instructions on replacing the water pump. Your instructions are really coming in handy as I am about to start on replacing my pump via a new OEM Honda part for my '82 GL1100A, same Wing as yours. Here's my question for you: The vendor sites I have visited state categorically not to use any type of lubricant, solvent, etc. as this would void the warranty for this pump. In other words, they state to only "dry install" the pump. Your instructions mention the use of vaseline, etc. in lubing the O rings...could this be a potential problem, especially in possibly deteriorating the rubber in the O rings? I know that rubber generally does not like petroleum based products. Here is a link to a vendor that has this warning: http://www.saber-cycle.com/store/Cooling1.html

Water pump Goldwing GL1000 GL1100 GL1200 OEM
OEM 19200-MG9-681 water pump for 1975 to 1987. DISCLAIMER: Caution Dry Fit Only. Use of ANY type of liquid, spray, gel lubricant, cleaner or solvent to install will damage internal seals and external O-rings resulting in possible premature pump failure. Use of any of the foregoing voids any replacement claim.
$190.00


Ignore what Saber Cycle says. They are notorious for giving out false and invalid information. Their aftermarket water pumps are also notorious for failing and leaking within months of installation, regardless of the method of installation - do a search online and you'll find many people who have had this experience. Incidentally, you can purchase original Honda OEM water pumps online for far less than Saber Cycle sells their failure-prone Chinese aftermarket pumps.

The main problem with installing the water pump dry is that the clearances and tolerances for the external O-ring seals are extremely tight - in particular the larger one that fits into the slot in the water pump body. If it is installed dry, the O-ring tends to "roll" while it is being pushed back into the cover. The end result is an imperfect seal, and a leaky water pump - and I speak from experience on this.

The internal O-ring seals against engine oil, and is permanently bathed in oil, so they are made of a material that is impervious to petroleum based products. My lubricant of choice for this type of work is regular ATF (automatic transmission fluid).

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Re: How to remove and replace your water pump

Postby MSGT-R » Fri Dec 18, 2009 1:58 pm

Dry installing an o-ring makes it very difficult and you will sometimes either cut it or roll it over. In short, you'll have a leak. If you used a very small amount of Silicone grease (electrical grease) or silicone lubricant on your finger and applied it to the seal, the silicone will not attack it (or the o-ring is made of some pretty cheap stuff). I've been doing this for years, and my Father before me (he used Vasoline back in the day) with good results.

I'm sure at some point in time, someone used entirely too much stuff to lube the seals and blamed the problem on the product, or the person used something that attacked the rubber.

A good quality o-ring will not react with silicone, vasoline (petroleum jelly), or automotive lubricants such as oil. Now brake fluid is an entirely different problem and should be avoided at all costs!
Don't spook the road sheep.

robertdawber
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Re: How to remove and replace your water pump

Postby robertdawber » Mon Apr 12, 2010 8:10 pm

donk_67 wrote:This is a very timely article. I'm in the process of replacing my waterpump in my 81 GL 1100. Waiting on new pump and gasket kit currently. I managed to remove the pump without removing the radiator, I hope this doesn't cause problems with the install. You sir have my eternal gratitude. I'm sure this will help me from making blunders along the process. Mahalo!

Well stupid me-I never read thisall the way through.
I have mine on and back together-I was looking here to see if I could find the torque specs. Two things-
First, I am glad I did not put the water pump housing on prior to placing the entire cover back on the bike as it was easier to move the water pump impeller so it slid in place-thus the whole unit went right on.
Now-the question I have is can I take it off without ruining the gasket. I didn't check the neutral switch. It might be fine, I will know tomorrow-but if it is not (I took care to place it in the exact position)
Thanks
Bob

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Re: How to remove and replace your water pump

Postby WingAdmin » Mon Apr 12, 2010 9:19 pm

robertdawber wrote:First, I am glad I did not put the water pump housing on prior to placing the entire cover back on the bike as it was easier to move the water pump impeller so it slid in place-thus the whole unit went right on.
Now-the question I have is can I take it off without ruining the gasket. I didn't check the neutral switch. It might be fine, I will know tomorrow-but if it is not (I took care to place it in the exact position)
Thanks
Bob


Good idea about the water pump housing - although I eyeballed the position of the oil pump shaft, moved the water pump shaft to match it, and it slid right in with no problems at all.

Chances are if it hasn't been on for long, and the engine hasn't been run (i.e. no heat) the gasket should be OK to take off...that said, if you do have to take it off, do it very slowly and carefully!

robertdawber
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Re: How to remove and replace your water pump

Postby robertdawber » Sun Apr 18, 2010 9:42 am

By the way-the NAPA hose is a perfect match.
Do not forget to hook the fan wires back up before you put everything together! (second mistake in this adventure)
Also, did you all use the old clamps or go with the worm clamps generally found?
Bob




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