How to replace your fuel filter


Step-by-step tutorials on how to maintain and fix your GL1100
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How to replace your fuel filter

Postby WingAdmin » Sat Feb 28, 2009 7:39 pm



Changing your fuel filter is a very simple task, and shouldn't take more than about fifteen minutes. It is a regular maintenance item, and is a good way to protect your delicate and expensive-to-overhaul carburetors.

You will notice in this article that the fuel lines were changed from the beginning to the end of the article; that was done as part of this process - if you want more information on this procedure, see How to replace your fuel lines.

IMPORTANT: It should be obvious, but working with the fuel system will expose you to fuel and fuel vapors, which are flammable/explosive. There should be no sources of ignition (cigarettes, pilot flames, sparks, etc) anywhere in your work area, and there should be good ventilation at all times.

1. First, we need to remove the fuel from the fuel line. Turn the fuel petcock to "ON".

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2. Start the motorcycle normally, and establish a fast idle.

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3. While the motorcycle is running, turn the fuel petcock to "OFF".

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4. After 30 seconds or so, loosen the clamp fastening the fuel line to the petcock.

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5. Pull the clamp down on the fuel line to free the hose barb on the petcock.

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6. Gently twist and pull the fuel line off the petcock.

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7. Hold the fuel line up so as to not spill any fuel that may be remaining in it, and to keep fuel in the filter. Hold the fuel line in this position until the engine stalls from fuel exhaustion. Turn the ignition key off. At this point, the fuel lines and filter should no longer have fuel in them.

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8. Remove the crankcase vent clamp and hose from the crankcase, to facilitate access to the fuel filter.

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9. Loosen and remove the clamp on the left (input) pump line.

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10. Gently twist and pull the left (input) fuel line from the fuel pump.

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11. Looking in from the right side of the motorcycle, you will see a nut holding the fuel filter assembly to the tab on the front of the fuel tank. Using a socket extension, loosen and remove this fuel filter retention nut.

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13. Push the fuel filter to the left side of the motorcycle to free the stud from the frame, then gently remove the fuel filter assembly to the right.

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14. Remove the screw holding the fuel filter mounting bracket to the fuel filter, then remove the bracket.

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15. Remove both of the fuel line clamps holding the fuel lines to the filter.

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17. OEM Honda replacement fuel filters can be found for $18 from Cyclemax Ohio. Until recently, I used Emgo fuel filters, which were a perfect replacement for the Honda filters, and were available for just a few dollars. However, as detailed in this thread about Emgo fuel filter failures, they have had serious quality control problems of late, and some resellers have reported that they have stopped making them. An acceptable replacement is the the NAPA model 3011 fuel filter, which can be had for a few dollars.

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18. A benefit of the NAPA 3011 fuel filter is that it has a transparent case, which allows you to view the condition of the filter media, and to check for rust, sediment or debris.

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19. The NAPA 3011 filter is slightly larger in diameter than the OEM filter. To get it to fit, partially tighten the bracket screw, and then insert the filter into the bracket until it is firm. Then tighten the screw a half-turn or so to secure the filter. Don't tighten it too much, so that the filter won't be damaged.

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20. Because the screw won't be completely tightened, add a drop of blue Loctite to the screw threads, to prevent it from backing out.

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30. Assemble the remaining two hoses onto either end of the fuel filter, then tighten a clamp over each end.

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31. Push the fuel filter/hose assembly through the middle of the motorcycle, ensuring the filter is pointing the correct direction (in the case of the NAPA filter, the narrow side of the filter is the input side, and should be connected to the fuel petcock). Slide a clamp around the hose connector on that side, and push the hose onto the petcock barb. Tighten the clamp in place. Ensure the worm tab of the clamp (if any) does not interfere with the operation of the petcock.

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32. Put a clamp over the remaining hose, then push it onto the barb of the input side of the fuel pump and tighten it in place.

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33. Push the stud of the fuel filter bracket through the hole in the fuel tank tab, and tighten the nut over the stud. I recommend you use a drop or two of blue Loctite to fasten this nut in place - I have had this nut come loose due to vibration, even when tightened properly.

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34. Replace the crankcase ventilation hose on the crankcase, and fasten its clamp in place.

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35. Turn the fuel petcock on and check for leaks.

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36. If you have installed the transparent NAPA 3011 filter, you will be able to see it fill with fuel.

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37. Start the engine and allow it to run normally for a few minutes, checking for fuel leaks. Stop the engine, allow it to sit, and check again for leaks.

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Important!

The fuel system on your bike is the most dangerous system on which to work! Most people take gasoline for granted. We use it every day in our cars and bikes, without a thought as to just how flammable and explosive it is, and just how much potential energy it contains.

It's extremely important that you double check all the fuel line fasteners you loosen or remove when working on the fuel system. When you're finished, go over the whole system, starting from the fuel petcock, and ending up at the carburetors, and ensure each fuel line is pushed completely onto its fitting, that the fasteners are in the correct place, and that the fasteners are tight and in good condition.

This is the result of a GL1000 owner who had a loose fuel line fastener remaining after working on their fuel system - don't let this happen to you!

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detdrbuzzard
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Re: How to change your Fuel Filter

Postby detdrbuzzard » Tue Mar 03, 2009 5:40 pm

that is a great "how to" for 1000. 1100. and 1200 wings and hopefully someone will show how its done for a 1500 and 1800 wing
'99 ST1100, '93 se
'75 cb750k, '79 cb 750f, '79 cb750 superK
cb 450sc, sunL70
'06 st1300a
.... william

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WingAdmin
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Re: How to change your Fuel Filter

Postby WingAdmin » Tue Mar 03, 2009 6:44 pm

Good idea, I've added "How To" areas for those bikes as well.

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detdrbuzzard
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Re: How to replace your fuel filter

Postby detdrbuzzard » Sun May 03, 2009 8:32 am

and i've just changet the filter on my 1200
'99 ST1100, '93 se
'75 cb750k, '79 cb 750f, '79 cb750 superK
cb 450sc, sunL70
'06 st1300a
.... william

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WingAdmin
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Re: How to replace your fuel filter

Postby WingAdmin » Tue May 12, 2009 11:41 am

A quick note: After about 500 miles, I went over a lot of the pieces and parts on my bike that I worked over the past winter, and found that the fuel filter was loose - the nut that fastens the filter assembly to the fuel tank tab had backed off - it hadn't dropped off, but it would have in another couple of weeks or so.

As a result I took it off, applied some Loctite thread locker, and put it back on - I might suggest you may want to do the same if you attempt this maintenance.

kg5dd
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Re: How to change your Fuel Filter

Postby kg5dd » Mon Nov 23, 2009 9:46 am

detdrbuzzard wrote:that is a great "how to" for 1000. 1100. and 1200 wings and hopefully someone will show how its done for a 1500 and 1800 wing

And mabe the 85 and 86 fuel injected?

tcwin
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Re: How to replace your fuel filter

Postby tcwin » Mon Sep 13, 2010 10:06 am

Thank you, again, for these great articles. I have been doing a lot of maintenance to my bike that I never would have attempted without your articles. Your pictures and simple directions really made the difference.

indyfuse
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Re: How to replace your fuel filter

Postby indyfuse » Sat Oct 15, 2011 12:22 pm

This article made this a simple task. I found a fuel filter online for 5 dollars. Rcvd it in a couple of days, replaced it following the steps in the article. And back up and riding 20 minutes later.
My 82 GL1100 was running rough before i changed it; almost thought about taking it in to the mechanic. Glad I read through the articles first, saved me some money. And my bike is running better than she had for a while. Thx for the articles and keep them coming.

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Re: How to replace your fuel filter

Postby thirdstorybase » Fri Jul 13, 2012 2:01 pm

Just tackled this project on my gl1200 for the first time. thanks to you it was a breeze though i did cut one of the hoses about 1/4 inch too short the first time. seems the replacement filter was a little shorter than the origional. also stabbed my finger with a razor blade cutting the hose. i guess its a labor of blood, sweat and tears sometimes working on the wing. though there werent any tears thanks to this site. also replaced the radio bezel and changed up my led light switch. thanks again

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Re: How to replace your fuel filter

Postby petesgoldwing » Sat Oct 27, 2012 8:57 am

Soooo the NAPA 3011 filter will work on my 82 Wing ?
Thank you once again, man I just love this great group of guys. :D 8-) YOU ALL ARE JUST TO GREAT FOR WORDS :!: :D

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Re: How to replace your fuel filter

Postby WingAdmin » Sun Oct 28, 2012 9:45 pm

petesgoldwing wrote:Soooo the NAPA 3011 filter will work on my 82 Wing ?
Thank you once again, man I just love this great group of guys. :D 8-) YOU ALL ARE JUST TO GREAT FOR WORDS :!: :D


Like I mentioned, it's slightly larger in diameter than the OEM, but it can fit in the bracket with some Loctite to make sure the screw doesn't back out.

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Oldbear
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Re: How to replace your fuel filter

Postby Oldbear » Wed Apr 16, 2014 8:33 am

WingAdmin wrote:
petesgoldwing wrote:Soooo the NAPA 3011 filter will work on my 82 Wing ?
Thank you once again, man I just love this great group of guys. :D 8-) YOU ALL ARE JUST TO GREAT FOR WORDS :!: :D


Like I mentioned, it's slightly larger in diameter than the OEM, but it can fit in the bracket with some Loctite to make sure the screw doesn't back out.


I found it fits very well - with a slight tweaking of the bracket end that screw together - I'll post a pic tonight. And I always use Loctite - I lost too many cam end cap/covers on my Suzuki... I found the past to be great as it does drip everywhere - I use blue on most things.
My wife is the greatest - she won't let me sell my bike - I'm less grumpy when I ride...

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Oldbear
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Re: How to replace your fuel filter

Postby Oldbear » Wed Apr 16, 2014 1:23 pm

Oldbear wrote:
WingAdmin wrote:
petesgoldwing wrote:Soooo the NAPA 3011 filter will work on my 82 Wing ?
Thank you once again, man I just love this great group of guys. :D 8-) YOU ALL ARE JUST TO GREAT FOR WORDS :!: :D


Like I mentioned, it's slightly larger in diameter than the OEM, but it can fit in the bracket with some Loctite to make sure the screw doesn't back out.


I found it fits very well - with a slight tweaking of the bracket end that screw together - I'll post a pic tonight. And I always use Loctite - I lost too many cam end cap/covers on my Suzuki... I found the past to be great as it does drip everywhere - I use blue on most things.


I meant "paste to be great as it doesn't drip"
My wife is the greatest - she won't let me sell my bike - I'm less grumpy when I ride...

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Oldbear
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Re: How to replace your fuel filter

Postby Oldbear » Fri Apr 18, 2014 12:57 am

It fit just right... after I tweaked the tabs.
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My wife is the greatest - she won't let me sell my bike - I'm less grumpy when I ride...

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VentedGibbon
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Re: How to replace your fuel filter

Postby VentedGibbon » Thu Apr 02, 2015 2:13 pm

Seems like a good place to post this. Im working on an 82 gl1100 that's been sitting 5 years. I've replaced the fuel lines and filter, among others. Today I put gas in the tank and tried starting it, after I put a bit of oil in the cylinders last week and turned it over a few times first, and the gas seems to spurt into the fuel filter but doesn't really fill it or flow fast at all. I drained the discount battery trying to get it to start and it sputtered a couple times but I'm not sure if the fuel pump is working properly. I checked all the hoses and there are no air or fuel leaks. This is my first gold wing but second restoration so I don't know what I'm missing.

Should the fuel pump be pulling more gas? Enough to see a steady flow?

Is there a way to prime the fuel lines to be sure that gas is making it to the carbs?

Key was on, switch turned to run, tranny in neutral, petcock turned to on.


Do or do not, there is no try.

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