How to replace your radiator hoses


Step-by-step tutorials on how to maintain and fix your GL1100
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How to replace your radiator hoses

Postby WingAdmin » Sun Mar 22, 2009 9:23 pm



This is a somewhat unpleasant and messy job, but you will be rewarded knowing that your radiator hoses are new and will not rupture in the near future. 30 year old radiator hoses need to be replaced! The motorcycle MUST be cool before starting this procedure - do NOT attempt to do this with a hot engine! You will need a pan that can hold at least a gallon of liquid.

1. Remove the false tank. You can find instructions on how to do this here.

2. With your pan underneath, remove the coolant drain bolt on the front of the motorcycle, on the thermostat housing, next to the oil drain bolt.

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3. Allow the coolant to start to drain into the pan. Make sure your pan is right up as far as the front wheel, because the next step will have coolant gushing out.

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4. Find the radiator cap on the top of the bike, immediately in front of the coolant reservoir.

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5. Remove the radiator cap. The coolant will start gushing out into your pan. Remove the black overflow hose from the filler neck - this hose connects the radiator to the coolant reservoir. This hose can be seen at the 10 o'clock position on the filler neck.

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6. After the coolant has drained, replace and snug the coolant drain bolt.

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7. Loosen the compression fitting holding the upper radiator hose to the water pump. Slide the fitting down off the hose onto the water pump.

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8. Do the same thing to the fitting holding the lower radiator hose to the thermostat. Remove the hose from the thermostat. If it is too tight, you can simply cut this hose in half immediately above the thermostat.

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9. Remove the upper radiator hose from the water pump. If it is like mine, 30 years of compression will have all but welded it in place. I used a sharp knife to slice the hose, then a screwdriver to pry it away from the water pump.

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10. Disconnect the radiator fan. This picture is looking in from the left side of the bike, but it is best accomplished by reaching in from the right side. You must press a locking tab in on the side of the connector before pulling them apart.

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11. The official Honda service manual states simply "remove the radiator as a unit." This is virtually impossible to do, because the horn mounting tabs are in the way. Remove the horns, then gently bend the horn mounting tabs outward.

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12. Remove the acorn nuts holding the protective grill in place, and remove the grill.

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13. Remove the bolts holding the lower brackets in place. This will free the bottom of the radiator.

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14. Remove the upper acorn nuts holding the top of the radiator. Note in this picture the horn mounting tabs have not yet been bent outwards. Once these nuts are removed, the top of the radiator is freed.

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15. Remove the cover from the top of the radiator. This is the most difficult part of the job. You may find that you need to bend the horn mounting tabs out a bit more in order to get it off.

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16. Pull the bottom of the radiator outwards about 4-5 inches, then gently guide the top of the radiator off the mounting studs. You may want to have an assistant help guide the filler neck through its hole from the top of the bike. Lay the radiator flat on the ground with the fan facing up.

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17. Pull the protective coils off the old hoses and set them aside.

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18. Our replacement hoses will be made from a single NAPA NBH7733 radiator hose.

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19. Line up the NAPA hose next to the old hoses and cut it in half, matching the length and curve of the old hoses.

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20. Place the new hoses on the radiator, tighten them in place, then slide the protective coils over them.

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21. Place the compression fittings over the end of the hoses and push them up as far as the coils will allow. Clean the radiator with compressed air or water.

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22. Place the radiator in the bike, top first, guiding the filling neck up into its hole. Guide the studs through the top radiator bushings, then put the top cover in place over them. Put the nuts on the studs to hold it in place, but do not tighten them yet. Push the lower hose onto the thermostat, push the compression fitting down, and tighten it in place.

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23. Replace the bottom brackets and push the bolts through the bottom radiator bushings into the bike frame. Tighten both bolts. Now tighten the upper nuts.

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24. Replace the protective grill.

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25. Gently bend the horn tabs back into place, and replace the horns.

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26. Push the upper hose onto the water pump, push the compression fitting down, and tighten it in place.

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27. Reaching in from the right side of the bike, reconnect the fan. This is tough to do, because once your hand is in this tight space, you can't see anything - so you have to do it blind, by feel. Turn the fan by hand to ensure that no wires, hoses or other objects will impede its rotation.

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28. Reconnect the overflow hose to the filler neck.

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29. Fill the radiator with coolant. This is where I prefer to use genuine Honda coolant, to preserve the delicate seals on my water pump:

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However, any modern pre-mix coolant usable on aluminum engines is acceptable, but it absolutely MUST be "silicate free."
This Prestone 50/50 premix should also work well:

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30. Note that the coolant must be "Silicate Free" as shown here. Coolant containing silicates will destroy the seals in your water pump in short order.

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31. Run the engine for several minutes, adding coolant to keep the coolant level near the top of the filler neck as it runs. You may need to rev the engine several times in order to get all the air out of the system. Each time the coolant level drops, add more coolant to bring it back up to the filler neck.

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32. Stop the engine and replace the radiator cap.

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33. Fill the coolant reservoir with coolant to the "Full" line.

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34. Start and run the engine until the cooling fan has cycled on at least twice. Monitor the coolant level in the reservoir over the next few trips you make on your motorcycle and add more as required. Check for leaks.

35. Replace the false tank.



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guitarlos
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Re: How to replace your radiator hoses

Postby guitarlos » Mon Feb 22, 2010 5:45 pm

One thing I may add, for me, to disconnect the wires leading to the fan......I had a second set of arms hold the radiator and slightly pull it out towards the front of the bike. Doing this gave me ample room to get my hands onto the connector. Maybe I have sissy hands :lol: , but I had to use a screw driver to seperate the locking mech on the connector.

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Re: How to replace your radiator hoses

Postby WingAdmin » Mon Feb 22, 2010 7:02 pm

guitarlos wrote:One thing I may add, for me, to disconnect the wires leading to the fan......I had a second set of arms hold the radiator and slightly pull it out towards the front of the bike. Doing this gave me ample room to get my hands onto the connector. Maybe I have sissy hands :lol: , but I had to use a screw driver to seperate the locking mech on the connector.


It does take a fair bit of manual dexterity to get that connector apart....and back together when re-assembling. I can only fit one hand in there, so I have to manage to depress the locking tab, then pull the two parts of the connector apart, using only the fingers on one hand. I am better at it than I was the first time I had to do it, and I don't swear quite so much while doing it anymore.

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Re: How to replace your radiator hoses

Postby Five » Fri Apr 23, 2010 9:09 pm

For reference, the Advance Auto part number is 70834 for the same hose.
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Re: How to replace your radiator hoses

Postby Newwinger » Thu May 06, 2010 1:10 pm

30. Note that the coolant must be "Silicate Free" as shown here. Coolant containing silicates will destroy the seals in your water pump in short order.

Now there's a little nugget of information I could have used in March when I was putting my engine back together. I didn't see anything mentioned in the manual (I realize it's 27 yrs old).
I just checked and I'm alright. I can sleep well tonight. :)
Rick - 83 GL1100

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Re: How to replace your radiator hoses

Postby OldSchool_IsCool » Fri Jan 21, 2011 11:12 am

Awesome tutorials!!

Seems to me that this would also be a good time to replace the thermostat (OEM, Stant# 13868 or NAPA101), check the water pump (if the impeller is plastic, I hear that it should be replaced, clean the fan & horn electrical connections (pack with dielectric grease upon reconnect). New rad cap (OEM, Stant# 10229 or Belkamp 703-1445). May also want to freshen the front of the radiator with a little paint too.

Is there any means to lube or service the fan while it's out? Any additional radiator service (rince out, boil out)?

Also consider timing belts, tensioners, timing belt cover seals, fork seals, fork oil, rebuild front calipers, steering head bearings... Dang this slope is slippery!!


Please feel free to correct, reject or expand upon these comments. I'm new to Goldwings and am hardly an expert!

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Re: How to replace your radiator hoses

Postby WingAdmin » Fri Jan 21, 2011 11:37 am

It is an excellent time to replace the thermostat, as well as the O-rings on the thermostat housing, which are famous for wearing out and leaking.

The water pump, as long as there is no play in the bearings, will be fine with the plastic impeller. If you want to spend a couple hundred dollars on a new pump and a gasket set to do it, then sure it's a great time to replace it - but if you have no leakage, and there's no evidence of bearing failure, you can probably leave well enough alone.

The fan motor is sealed, no lubrication required.

I've never had a problem with scale on my Goldwing radiator, but if you do, then sure go ahead and clean it out. The only radiator service I've done is to straighten fins bent over by large bugs and stones from the road.

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Re: How to replace your radiator hoses

Postby BRONCOMAN » Wed Aug 03, 2011 9:58 am

This helped alot, but i unbolted the neck of the thermostat (lower radiator) and no stat, so i thought could it be in the upper neck??I did try to fit the new stat in the hole but it wouldn't fit.What iam i missing??

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Re: How to replace your radiator hoses

Postby 78AzWing » Mon Sep 26, 2011 8:22 am

Thermostat is at the end of the top hose inside the housing.
The lower hose goes to the pump housing.
Which figures, because the lower hose and housing are really easy to get to.
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Re: How to replace your radiator hoses

Postby BRONCOMAN » Mon Sep 26, 2011 9:43 am

nice and thanks for your help :)

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Re: How to replace your radiator hoses

Postby tubamanz » Fri Mar 30, 2012 2:33 pm

What is the coolant capacity? Will 1 jug of the Prestone do it?

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Re: How to replace your radiator hoses

Postby WingAdmin » Fri Mar 30, 2012 2:37 pm

If I remember correctly, it is 4 quarts, or very close to it. One jug will be fine.

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Re: How to replace your radiator hoses

Postby tubamanz » Mon Apr 16, 2012 2:56 pm

I did this (and the timing belts and flushed the radiator) on Saturday. Timing belts were Honda OEM, so I will guess that they were the originals - with 69,000 miles.

Thanks very much for the detailed info. I had to laugh when it started with "remove the seat" - i.e. start at the back to work on the front.

You're so right about removing that darn radiator top cover - what a huge pain. I would love to see how factory trained Honda folks would do this.

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Re: How to replace your radiator hoses

Postby 78AzWing » Mon Apr 16, 2012 4:05 pm

I would be willing to bet that factory trained Honda mechanics are/were smaller than you and can get their hands in places you cannot. :D


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