How to add a trunk rack to your bike


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How to add a trunk rack to your bike

Postby WingAdmin » Mon Oct 19, 2009 8:49 pm



I had wanted to add a trunk rack to my bike for some time - primarily, for camping purposes, to allow us to carry a tent or other things that are too large to fit in the trunk or side bags. However, I was always worried about the thin ABS plastic that the trunk was made of - I had images in my mind of the trunk rack punching right through the hard-to-find plastic trunk lid.

I finally decided to go ahead and get the job done. The trunk rack I used came from Cyclemax. I decided that in order to mount the thing, I would first reinforce the trunk lid, to allow it to better carry the load that would be placed upon it.

The trunk lid can be easily removed from a GL1100 - other bikes may or may not be similar. On a GL1100, you open the lid all the way, then slide it gently to the right. The hinges will release, and the trunk lid will come free. I put some towels down on the kitchen counter, and placed the trunk lid upside down on them (more on the kitchen momentarily).

1. To start with, purchase a three-foot length of 3 inch diameter ABS pipe. Mine had 1/2 inch thick walls, and was over twice the thickness of the existing trunk. Make sure it is ABS - all of the plastic fairings on the Goldwing are ABS, and attempting to bond a different type of plastic to them won't work. Cut two 8-inch sections from the pipe, and then cut each 8-inch section lengthwise, so the pipe has a slit down the side. Ignore the cobwebs. :)

Image

2. The next couple steps I do not have pictures for, for fear of incriminating myself should my wife somehow stumble across them. Heat up your kitchen oven to 300 degrees, line a cookie pan with non-stick tin foil, and put the pipe with the slit in it on the pan. Allow it to warm up for a few minutes until it starts to soften. Gently pull it apart at the slit, until you can get it to the point where it is more flat than round. Then let it warm for a good five minutes in the oven, until it is the consistency of rubber. You'll need gloves at this point to handle it - it will be hot! I also recommend that you run the kitchen exhaust fan while doing this if you don't wish your wife to question you about the smell of burnt plastic hanging in the kitchen.

3. Take the ABS piece from the oven, and form it into the inside of the trunk lid - do this quickly before it can harden! Use some old towels (or some good ones, if your wife is out of town, like mine was) to push the plastic into the lid - use some force! The towels will a) insulate you from the heat, and b) press the hot ABS with equal pressure into all the curves and folds of the inside of the lid. Hold it in place for a good minute - after this point, it will have hardened, and taken on the shape of the inner contours of the lid. Repeat this for the other side of the lid.

4. Scrape the paint off the inside of the lid where the ABS reinforcement will bond. Coat the inside of the lid and the reinforcement LIBERALLY with ABS cement. Push the reinforcement into place, slide it back and forth a couple times to make sure the cement is equally distributed, and clamp TIGHTLY. I used wood clamps to clamp the sides, and a 40 pound bag of sand to apply pressure to the top. The ABS cement says it needs two hours to cure, but I found it took more like four hours. When cured, remove the clamps and repeat on the other side.

Image

There should be no gaps between the reinforcement and the lid anywhere - it was formed to the shape of the lid, before it hardened, so it should fit perfectly, as shown in the picture above. You'll notice now that the trunk lid is a fair bit more stiff than it was before, simply because of the strength of the new plastic that has been added to it.

4. Take some painter's masking tape, and mask off the top of the lid where the rack feet will be fastened. This is both to mark the drilling locations, and to prevent burrs and paint lifting while drilling. Center the rack and make sure it is positioned exactly where you want it to go, then draw around each foot on the masking tape.

Image

5. Remove the rack, and you should have perfect circles where each foot was located.

Image

6. Measure the center of each circle and draw crosshairs, to locate your drilling position.

Image

7. Drill using a small diameter bit first, to ensure you drill the exact position you want, then use the correct size bit for the machine screws you will be using. Keep in mind that the holes need to be perpendicular to the GROUND, not to the curve of the lid. Put the trunk rack on the lid and have a look at the angle of the feet - that's the angle you'll need to drill the holes to, or else the machine screws will not line up correctly. When finished drilling, remove the tape.

Image

8. The fastening hardware that the rack came with is good, but I was a little worried about the size of the washers. I didn't want the rack feet punching a hole through the lid. Also, with the ABS reinforcement in place, the supplied screws were not long enough.

Image

9. I went to the hardware store and bought longer (1.5 inch) screws (this rack uses standard M6 thread screws), along with one-inch fender washers and matching rubber washers. This spreads the load over a much wider area than the original hardware and makes me feel better.

Image

10. Put a fender washer on the screw (I used two, to adjust for the screw length), and push it through from the bottom of the lid. Then put the rubber washer down onto the screw, followed by another metal fender washer. This compresses the rubber washer against the trunk lid, to keep it water-tight.

Image

11. Start the threads by hand on each foot, then start tightening them a bit at a time (a bit on one foot, then a bit on the next, and so on). Tighten enough to compress the rubber washers, but not to damage the plastic (remember, this is relatively soft ABS you're working with).

Image

12. The result: An extremely strong trunk rack that does not depend on the strength of the lid top to support it; instead it transfers the weight down to the much stronger sides of the trunk lid. Now go out for a long ride on some twisty roads to test your work - I consider this to be a mandatory procedure after doing any work on the motorcycle, no matter how minor! :)

Image



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Re: How to add a trunk rack to your bike

Postby WA9FWT » Tue Nov 24, 2009 1:45 pm

Hi Wingadmin
By reading this well put togather artical gave me the idea of using that ABS material to fabricate something to the bottom
of those lower Faring cover mounts that seem to brake off over time. The ABS material sure would be a filler with whats
missing on mine. I have used that ABS building antennas and it sure stands up to the weather.But I have not seen any one mold it the way you have. Now to mold it to the back of those covers, drill a new mounting hole and have a new stronger lower cover.Of coarse I will have to make a " slurry " of ABS shavings with the cement to mold it to the back of the lower cover.i just hope it will melt into the old ABS cover and hold. good Winter project.

Thanks again for the Idea. 73 Phil WA9FWT

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Re: How to add a trunk rack to your bike

Postby WingAdmin » Tue Nov 24, 2009 2:35 pm

WA9FWT wrote:Hi Wingadmin
By reading this well put togather artical gave me the idea of using that ABS material to fabricate something to the bottom
of those lower Faring cover mounts that seem to brake off over time. The ABS material sure would be a filler with whats
missing on mine. I have used that ABS building antennas and it sure stands up to the weather.But I have not seen any one mold it the way you have. Now to mold it to the back of those covers, drill a new mounting hole and have a new stronger lower cover.Of coarse I will have to make a " slurry " of ABS shavings with the cement to mold it to the back of the lower cover.i just hope it will melt into the old ABS cover and hold. good Winter project.

Thanks again for the Idea. 73 Phil WA9FWT


Make sure the old ABS cover is well-covered with cement first - that chemically melts the ABS, so that it bonds with the new ABS that you are adding to it. The result is not two pieces of ABS glued together, but two pieces of ABS that are bonded together - they have become one piece of plastic.

I have thought about fixing those lower fairing mounts by embedding a piece of steel inside ABS, using the same slurry idea you mention. For those who haven't encountered ABS slurry before, you take an ABS pipe like I used before, and using a coarse rasp, shave it until you have a large pile of ABS shavings. Add ABS cement to this until you have a thick, black slurry of liquified ABS. You'll only have a few minutes to work with this before it starts to harden, so you may have to add more cement. This slurry can be used to fill gaps, cracks, or to fit odd shaped ares that need repair or reinforcement. Once it hardens, it has the original strength of a molded ABS part.

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Re: How to add a trunk rack to your bike

Postby melhadden » Sat Dec 12, 2009 11:46 am

Here is something I have done. Looking around the internet you can find ABS plastic sheeting material which is OK if you own the plastic company (pricey). Instead I took the WingAdmin's plastic pipe method and went a little further. Sawing a 4" inch ABS pipe down the center then sawing those halves into strips, I heated them in the oven (300 degrees) until they almost flattened out. Then I took a 1200 watt heat gun (not hair dryer) to the strips and heated them almost to their flash point using a teflon coated cookie sheet as work surface. Took a wooden rolling pin (the little lady HAS to be visiting someone) to the HOT strips and rolled it in both directions. Re-heating the thinner strips and using welding gloves I took my saw ( a cheap one) placed it over the heated strip and applied pressure for a minute. End result is a flat piece of halfpipe about half the thickness of the original pipe. Sawed the strips using my trusty GINSU kitchen knife to fit areas that I needed to repair, applied gobs of ABS cement, placed strips and held for a minute then don't touch for at least an hour then resumed repairs. The trunk and both saddlebags had been cracked and crunched into an almost hopeless state but now the trunk is repaired and mounted, one saddlebag repaired (awaiting tailight assembly) and I just started on the left saddlebag yesterday. Almost done with it.
The saddle bag I'm now working on had been attempted to be repaired by a Dr. Frankenstein. Someone drilled holes to either side of the cracks and used tie wraps to keep the parts together then glued rubber inside the saddlebag with contact cement over the tie-wrap stitches to keep everything from moving around. Sadly, that didn't work and looks terrible but thankfully the only thing that sticks to ABS is more ABS. A few scrapes with the GINSU and we're down to business!
Sorry no pictures 'cause the little lady has my camera visiting friends on the other side of the country. Very good thing too! ;)

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Re: How to add a trunk rack to your bike

Postby WA9FWT » Fri Jan 22, 2010 10:18 pm

WingAdmin wrote:
WA9FWT wrote:Hi Wingadmin
By reading this well put togather artical gave me the idea of using that ABS material to fabricate something to the bottom
of those lower Faring cover mounts that seem to brake off over time. The ABS material sure would be a filler with whats
missing on mine. I have used that ABS building antennas and it sure stands up to the weather.But I have not seen any one mold it the way you have. Now to mold it to the back of those covers, drill a new mounting hole and have a new stronger lower cover.Of coarse I will have to make a " slurry " of ABS shavings with the cement to mold it to the back of the lower cover.i just hope it will melt into the old ABS cover and hold. good Winter project.

Thanks again for the Idea. 73 Phil WA9FWT


Make sure the old ABS cover is well-covered with cement first - that chemically melts the ABS, so that it bonds with the new ABS that you are adding to it. The result is not two pieces of ABS glued together, but two pieces of ABS that are bonded together - they have become one piece of plastic.

I have thought about fixing those lower fairing mounts by embedding a piece of steel inside ABS, using the same slurry idea you mention. For those who haven't encountered ABS slurry before, you take an ABS pipe like I used before, and using a coarse rasp, shave it until you have a large pile of ABS shavings. Add ABS cement to this until you have a thick, black slurry of liquified ABS. You'll only have a few minutes to work with this before it starts to harden, so you may have to add more cement. This slurry can be used to fill gaps, cracks, or to fit odd shaped ares that need repair or reinforcement. Once it hardens, it has the original strength of a molded ABS part.

I have thought about fixing those lower fairing mounts by embedding a piece of steel inside ABS, using the same slurry idea you mention
Well, it's been some time passed since I read the above statement.And today I did just that.I got a 5 1/2 inch long piece by 1/2 wide of steel with holes in it and Cemented it to the back side of those lower pannels to hold in place.Of coarse i had to form and bend to mold in. I first etched the ABS lower panel with PVC primer, that purple stuff that I had laying around. I then purchased some ABS BLACK Cement, mixed in the shavings. I don't know if i did any thing wrong, but I found it took 24 hours before it seemed hard. I let 48 hours go by ,before I tried to remove that brace.Of coarse the real test will be on the bike for some time. WA9FWT Phil

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Re: How to add a trunk rack to your bike

Postby Anon » Mon Mar 22, 2010 8:11 pm

WA9FWT, do you have pics of your reinforcement?

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Re: How to add a trunk rack to your bike

Postby WA9FWT » Mon Mar 22, 2010 9:01 pm

Anon wrote:WA9FWT, do you have pics of your reinforcement?

Anon
I just sent you a PM, and my computer address.Send me a note and I will be glad to send you the pictures.I sure was a happy camper when our site administrator posted his experience with working with that ABS material. When he said it melts right into the existing ABS it sure does, in fact in even melted through the other side.Not bad, but that just told me it's bonded for good.Of coarse I put it on thick to hold the metal in place, and the metal had holes in it also.

So far I have not run into any one that could patch, and then paint over it. But the way I used it, I didn't have to paint.I did find that it took at least 24 hours to dry.But I let sit total for two days...

WA9FWT Phil

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Re: How to add a trunk rack to your bike

Postby WingAdmin » Mon Mar 22, 2010 9:02 pm

Hey Phil, go ahead and post the pictures here on this thread, I'd like to see them as well, and I'm sure others would too.

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Re: How to add a trunk rack to your bike

Postby WA9FWT » Tue Mar 23, 2010 1:01 am


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Re: How to add a trunk rack to your bike

Postby WA9FWT » Tue Mar 23, 2010 12:08 pm


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Re: How to add a trunk rack to your bike

Postby WA9FWT » Tue Mar 23, 2010 12:39 pm


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Re: How to add a trunk rack to your bike

Postby jeffinpittsburgh » Sat Nov 27, 2010 10:52 pm

you guys hit a nerve here...
i have been educating myself on this goldwing i just got
i restore vintage apache campers...the old school 1s with the hard ABS sides, that no-one thinks is worth anything when they crack & break... find them dirt cheap & make them new again
i like the pipe in the oven for forming into the trunk lid. however try using this for repairs to cracks & filling holes
1st, if you make ABS shavings or buy abs pellets @ most hardware stores
2nd put them in a mason jar- & then add a product called MEK that u can buy at true value hardware stores.
this will turn into a pancake batter consistency that is very easy to work with & you can form this into anything (molds) just by pouring...it dries fast and when u mess up all you do is add more liquid to it to thin it down. instant ABS in liquid form
i make letters, molded side panels, roofs, doors u name it. i also buy 20 of these a year & sell maybe 15 of these campers a year in vintage museum brand new condition. i got a reputation for this procedure & selling these campers that spans cross country

http://fotolode.com/images/njjimf/71.jpg

http://www.trukx.com/forum/index.php?ac ... ic=73807.0

hopefully 1 day i will be making goldwings!! (as soon as i figure this one out) you guys are a blessing to me
thanks for all your help & input

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Re: How to add a trunk rack to your bike

Postby WingAdmin » Sun Nov 28, 2010 10:40 am

I don't know what MEK is, but that's a method that's fairly well-known for filling voids - shaving down ABS pipe, then mixing the shavings with ABS cement until you get a thick slurry, then work it into the crack/void.

I suspect MEK is a solvent just like the ABS cement.

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Re: How to add a trunk rack to your bike

Postby kb9lww » Wed Feb 16, 2011 10:53 am

MEK = Methyl Ethyl Ketone, the active ingredient in lots of things from paint stripper to bondo hardener, and probably ABS cement. :D

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Re: How to add a trunk rack to your bike

Postby macka » Sun May 29, 2011 9:28 am

jeffinpitts,

Thanks for the trick. Gonna give it a shot on the airbox on my sled.

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Re: How to add a trunk rack to your bike

Postby ernest62 » Sat Feb 18, 2012 10:31 pm

I never thought of heating abs pipe to use in this manner, thanks for the tips.

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Re: How to add a trunk rack to your bike

Postby jskeys » Wed Feb 29, 2012 12:39 pm

Thanks for the posts, my next task on my wing is to repair to areas that are broken on the ABS. One is a piece broken off the lip of the trunk lid abt 3 inches long and an in wide. The other is on the lower left faring about 3 inches by 2 inches. I will go out and look for the materials today.

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Re: How to add a trunk rack to your bike

Postby WA9FWT » Wed Feb 29, 2012 1:50 pm

jskeys wrote:Thanks for the posts, my next task on my wing is to repair to areas that are broken on the ABS. One is a piece broken off the lip of the trunk lid abt 3 inches long and an in wide. The other is on the lower left faring about 3 inches by 2 inches. I will go out and look for the materials today.


It's been a couple of years since I did the repairs to my lower Faring, and I must say it has held up with no problems.I was so glad to see that artical from our WingAdmin that he had posted.The only thing I found different then what he said was the slurry sets up real fast.I found that it took a lot longer then what he said.
Of coarse it could have been something I did different in mixing the filings into the black ABS cement.
The metal brace's I gluged into the ABS sure came out just fine.

I still have NOT found that any one on here has sanded after a repair and painted the ABS.Other words to make a repair, sand it smooth and Paint. I'm sure it can be done !
Good luck in your repair,and let us know how it is going....
WA9FWT Phil

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Re: How to add a trunk rack to your bike

Postby WingAdmin » Wed Feb 29, 2012 2:33 pm

WA9FWT wrote:It's been a couple of years since I did the repairs to my lower Faring, and I must say it has held up with no problems.I was so glad to see that artical from our WingAdmin that he had posted.The only thing I found different then what he said was the slurry sets up real fast.I found that it took a lot longer then what he said.
Of coarse it could have been something I did different in mixing the filings into the black ABS cement.
The metal brace's I gluged into the ABS sure came out just fine.


I think it depends on the cement used. The first time I did it, I used ABS plumber's cement, and the slurry was firm within minutes, and cured hard within a few hours. The second time I did it, my can of ABS cement had hardened, so I went and bought a new can - but it seems nobody sells straight ABS cement anymore, so this can was ABS/PVC cement.

Using that stuff, the slurry was soft for days, and took literally a couple of weeks before it was fully cured and hard.

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Re: How to add a trunk rack to your bike

Postby WA9FWT » Wed Feb 29, 2012 3:33 pm

WingAdmin wrote:
WA9FWT wrote:It's been a couple of years since I did the repairs to my lower Faring, and I must say it has held up with no problems.I was so glad to see that artical from our WingAdmin that he had posted.The only thing I found different then what he said was the slurry sets up real fast.I found that it took a lot longer then what he said.
Of coarse it could have been something I did different in mixing the filings into the black ABS cement.
The metal brace's I gluged into the ABS sure came out just fine.


I think it depends on the cement used. The first time I did it, I used ABS plumber's cement, and the slurry was firm within minutes, and cured hard within a few hours. The second time I did it, my can of ABS cement had hardened, so I went and bought a new can - but it seems nobody sells straight ABS cement anymore, so this can was ABS/PVC cement.

Using that stuff, the slurry was soft for days, and took literally a couple of weeks before it was fully cured and hard.

Interesting......I just checked my can of (Master Plumber ABS Black cement ) $3.99 8OZ can, and it has dried out
and just like a rubber ball. The can 4OZ of "Oatey " Purple primer for PVC,and CPVC is still ok.
Thanks for the up date,Others will now know things can vary... :o
Phil WA9FWT

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Re: How to add a trunk rack to your bike

Postby WingAdmin » Wed May 09, 2012 11:12 am

Incidentally, I did the exact same procedure on my GL1500 to mount and reinforce the trunk rack. Works great!

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Re: How to add a trunk rack to your bike

Postby WA9FWT » Wed May 09, 2012 1:19 pm

WingAdmin wrote:Incidentally, I did the exact same procedure on my GL1500 to mount and reinforce the trunk rack. Works great!


That is good to know, so others can repair that ABS and it works.I used some of that mixture this winter and fixed
a cover on the fairing that was cracked.It sure did the job.And I must say my adding the metal into the side covers is still holding up like the day I fixed it.It sure saved me $$$ from looking for used parts. TNX,

WA9FWT Phil

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Re: How to add a trunk rack to your bike

Postby djchopperd » Wed May 16, 2012 2:44 pm

WingAdmin wrote:
WA9FWT wrote:It's been a couple of years since I did the repairs to my lower Faring, and I must say it has held up with no problems.I was so glad to see that artical from our WingAdmin that he had posted.The only thing I found different then what he said was the slurry sets up real fast.I found that it took a lot longer then what he said.
Of coarse it could have been something I did different in mixing the filings into the black ABS cement.
The metal brace's I gluged into the ABS sure came out just fine.


I think it depends on the cement used. The first time I did it, I used ABS plumber's cement, and the slurry was firm within minutes, and cured hard within a few hours. The second time I did it, my can of ABS cement had hardened, so I went and bought a new can - but it seems nobody sells straight ABS cement anymore, so this can was ABS/PVC cement.

Using that stuff, the slurry was soft for days, and took literally a couple of weeks before it was fully cured and hard.


You used the ABS/PVC that you use to go from one style pipe to another, called a transition cement and that is why is took so long. PVC is glued while ABS is "melted", so the cement that you use has a combination of both but as you experienced, is it not really what was needed for the job. You can still by the ABS cement, just check around.

I wholesale this stuff to plumbers all the time and never knew that I could use it on my Wing. thanks for the tips!!!

Dan

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Re: How to add a trunk rack to your bike

Postby WingAdmin » Wed May 16, 2012 2:49 pm

djchopperd wrote:You used the ABS/PVC that you use to go from one style pipe to another, called a transition cement and that is why is took so long. PVC is glued while ABS is "melted", so the cement that you use has a combination of both but as you experienced, is it not really what was needed for the job. You can still by the ABS cement, just check around.

I wholesale this stuff to plumbers all the time and never knew that I could use it on my Wing. thanks for the tips!!!


Thanks, you're 100% correct. I finally did find a place (local True Value) that sells straight ABS cement. I used it just this past weekend to make a slurry to manufacture a GPS mount, and it cured quickly.

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Re: How to add a trunk rack to your bike

Postby WA9FWT » Wed May 16, 2012 3:27 pm

This is getting to be a long trend.
What I would still like to know has any one sanded after a repair and paint .?
So far I have not had to sand and paint, so far :D But I know one day, I will have to make it look like new.

Thanks for the tip on the cement....

WA9FWT Phil




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