1200 training wheels


Step-by-step tutorials on how to maintain and fix your GL1200
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mervk
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Motorcycle: 1985 GL1200 LTD
1986 1200 SEI and Trigg Trike kit.
1993 'Black Beauty' 1500 SE and chair.
1993 GL1500 Trike.
+ about 20 bikes from 1914 to current.
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1200 training wheels

Postby mervk » Sat Feb 18, 2012 6:40 am



I have fitted training wheels to my 1200, and thought maybe someone else may be interested in how simple it was. If I can get it to work, I'll attach a couple of pics below. All that was involved was to remove the passenger footboards, and bolt an angle iron bracket behind them. No bike alterations other then running a few wires and fitting a switch.

The angle iron was 4 inch sides by 1/4 inch thick. I cut it to the same profile as the foot board, and it is not noticeable nestling in behind it. I replaced the three bolts with similar, but slightly longer. On the bottom of this angle section, I welded a smaller angle section which hangs vertical beneath it, and a piece of thick walled pipe is welded to that, protruding horizontally for the hinge.

The same thick walled pipe was used as the leg, and welded to a short piece of similar in the form of a T. The short T piece slips over the hinge piece on the bike. The wheel is simply bolted to the other end of the leg with a high tensile bolt through a hole drilled at a slight angle to allow the wheel to point forward.

One photo shows the bike with the wheels up, and you can just see the bottom of the rubber tire protruding below the pannier. The other pic shows the bike upright, balanced and supported by the wheels. There is a 12 volt actuator bolted simply to the crash bars on each side. These actuators were cheap, as I wasn't sure how successful the project may be, but as it works so well, I intend getting good quality actuators, and chrome plating the legs.

If there is any interest, I'll do some rough sketches and post them. There is less then $100 of materials, not counting the actuators. The ones fitted cost about $140 each, But you can get better ones for more money. I don't use them while riding, but would now be lost without them when moving the bike at a gas station, in a car park, or even in my garage. All I need do is push, as the wheels hold it up.

Cheers
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Wheels 1
Wheels 1
wheels 2
wheels 2


Merv Kroll
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tricky
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Re: 1200 training wheels

Postby tricky » Sat Feb 18, 2012 8:24 pm

I think that is a great mod, I would be interested in drawings etc

How are they actuated, a switch on the bars? I have seen a type that drop down when the speed gets down to about 5 mph but not sure if they were made for the 1200s

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mervk
Posts: 85
Joined: Mon Jul 25, 2011 3:51 am
Location: Australia
Motorcycle: 1985 GL1200 LTD
1986 1200 SEI and Trigg Trike kit.
1993 'Black Beauty' 1500 SE and chair.
1993 GL1500 Trike.
+ about 20 bikes from 1914 to current.
Contact:

Re: 1200 training wheels

Postby mervk » Sat Feb 18, 2012 8:54 pm

I'll do some drawings over the next few days. There are many similar things available commercially, but not for the 1200. Leastways, I couldn't find any. And having two bad hips and a wooden leg, I really shouldn't be riding anything heavier then a Vespa scooter! But this Wing is so nice to ride, I want to stick with it as long as possible.

I have bought a switch which will auto raise the wheels at a preset speed, however have not wired it in as yet. For the time being, I'm just using an up=on, down=reversed type toggle switch on the left handlebar. As my right side is the weakest, I sometimes lower the wheels for balance while putting the kick stand up, and selecting first gear, but the real benefit is when manouvering in tight places, either on or off the bike.

Give me a couple days to finish the mowing and I'll get the camera busy.

Chees.
Merv Kroll
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WingAdmin
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Re: 1200 training wheels

Postby WingAdmin » Sun Feb 19, 2012 6:50 pm

That's great! I'm going to move this to the 1200 "How To" area, as I know other people will be interested.

Are the actuators just geared electric motors? Do they have limit switches?

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mervk
Posts: 85
Joined: Mon Jul 25, 2011 3:51 am
Location: Australia
Motorcycle: 1985 GL1200 LTD
1986 1200 SEI and Trigg Trike kit.
1993 'Black Beauty' 1500 SE and chair.
1993 GL1500 Trike.
+ about 20 bikes from 1914 to current.
Contact:

Re: 1200 training wheels

Postby mervk » Mon Feb 20, 2012 6:25 am

I have done a 5 page PDF file of this project. Also have it in .doc word format. How do I post that file on the forum? It is too much to compile live.

Cheers

Merv Kroll
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Merv Kroll
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2007 Aspen Sentry Trailer

Re: 1200 training wheels

Postby WingAdmin » Mon Feb 20, 2012 10:03 am

mervk wrote:I have done a 5 page PDF file of this project. Also have it in .doc word format. How do I post that file on the forum? It is too much to compile live.

Cheers

Merv Kroll
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Excellent! Send the doc file here: http://www.goldwingdocs.com/UploadFiles/UploadFiles.asp

I'll get it put up in this thread for you.

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mervk
Posts: 85
Joined: Mon Jul 25, 2011 3:51 am
Location: Australia
Motorcycle: 1985 GL1200 LTD
1986 1200 SEI and Trigg Trike kit.
1993 'Black Beauty' 1500 SE and chair.
1993 GL1500 Trike.
+ about 20 bikes from 1914 to current.
Contact:

Re: 1200 training wheels

Postby mervk » Mon Feb 20, 2012 5:54 pm

Have sent both. The .PDF is the better file, being smaller. Cheers.
Merv Kroll
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1998 XV250 Virago (sold)
2007 Aspen Sentry Trailer

Re: 1200 training wheels

Postby WingAdmin » Mon Feb 20, 2012 6:17 pm

OK, thanks to user mervk, we have a great DIY project for those riders who need some training wheels for their bike. This could very likely be easily adapted to most models of Goldwing. The following is his writeup:


The following notes explain how I attached “Helper” wheels to my Goldwing 1200. After much searching, I realized there were many different brands of helper wheels available, but all for the 1500 and 1800. My approaches to most manufacturers for a kit for my 1200 all returned a resounding “No”. Having a couple of suspect hips, an artificial leg, and ducks disease (butt too close to the ground) I decided to make my own. After several complicated attempts, I settled on this very simple solution.

The first photo below shows the bike being balanced by the wheels, and the second photo shows the wheels retracted beneath the pannier.

Wheels down
Wheels down


Wheels up
Wheels up


The main bracket is made from a short piece of 5” X 3” X ¼” angle iron. (see pic below). I simply sat the rear foot board inside the angle, and drew the footboard’s outline with chalk. I then cut the angle to the same shape, and drilled 3 holes using the footboard holes as a pattern. I suspect that even if you have pegs, then the bolt holes will still be there in the frame.

Using similar but longer bolts, I loosely bolted both the footboard and bracket into place, then using a piece of 2” X 2” X ¼” angle of similar length, I held it below the main bracket as near to, but clear of the muffler as reasonable, and marked its position with chalk. I then removed the main bracket, and welded the smaller angle beneath it. To this smaller angle, I then welded a short piece of thick walled pipe to use as an inner hinge. I hope the feeble graphics attempt explains the makeup of the finished product.

Angle iron
Angle iron


Assembly diagram
Assembly diagram


For the leg, I used thick walled black pipe of 1 ¼” od. The inner hinge piece welded to the footboard bracket is a good fit inside of this pipe. I cut a short piece and just tacked it to the leg, then slid it onto the inner hinge piece. I then bent the leg to such an angle that when raised, the wheel would sit as wide as possible, but still nestle beneath the pannier. When happy with this angle, I permanently welded the outer hinge piece to the leg. I then drilled the lower end of the leg for my axle, a 5/8” high tensile bolt with a nyloc nut, which snugly fit the bearing inners in the wheels.

It is most important to have the length of the leg such that the wheel will be in line with the rear axle when lowered. This ensures they do not foul when climbing driveway gutters. The small wheels, when in line with the rear wheel, will always climb a bump at the same time. It is also important to drill the axle hole at such an angle so as to allow the small wheel to track forward. I used a 6” solid tyred wheel with roller bearings, readily available at my local hardware store. (The 5” in the graphic above is a typo.) Also, bear in mind that the further to the rear the swivel hinge is, the less movement required to raise or lower the leg. This is most noticeable in the speed when retracting the wheels. The faster, the better.

Bar pivot
Bar pivot


Wheel end
Wheel end


Wheel assembly
Wheel assembly


I slid a washer onto the inner hinge tube first, to give a buffer from the weld. Then slid the leg on with the outer hinge tube, then another washer, and it’s all held in place by a rather large cotter pin. There is only one nut and one cotter pin to be removed to take the leg off the bike.

Pivot 1
Pivot 1


Pivot 2
Pivot 2


Cotter pin 1
Cotter pin 1


Cotter pin 2
Cotter pin 2


The final step is the electric actuator. There is a large range available on eBay, and I settled on a couple of cheaper ones, as I was still unconvinced something so simple could work. The important bit of the actuator is adjustable limit switches. Though you could do the sums on actuator travel versus position on leg to lower a certain distance, it is much easier if there are adjustable limit switches. I settled initially on a pair from eBay seller MYPUSHCART in Tucson, Az. They cost me $66.95 each, and I also bought 2 mounting kits for $24.95 each, and a relay wiring kit which I have not used. These actuators have a max of 4” travel, and will lift 225 lb. This eBay seller could not be more helpful, and I’m sure there are many like him out there.

For mounting, I just used a piece of 2” X ¼” flat bar, held to the pannier crash bars by stainless U bolts with nyloc nuts. This bar does flex a little, and I suggest reinforcing it with a piece of narrow flat bar welded down one side at 90 degrees. I have some polished stainless for the final product, but am still deciding what actuators I will use as final.

Actuator 1
Actuator 1


Actuator 2
Actuator 2


For wiring, I used very heavy wire, even though the actuators do not draw excessive amps. I placed an inline fuse close to the battery, and wired direct to the battery terminals. I find I often need to raise or lower the wheels just to move the bike in my garage, so not having to turn the ignition key is a bonus. I mounted a toggle switch on the left hand grip with a bracket I fashioned from a piece of stainless. This switch is on in both the up and down positions, and off when in the centre, I wired the actuators to the top terminals, then reversed the connections to the bottom terminals, so up means wheels up, and down means wheels down. Being able to turn them off also allows me to lower them halfway for removal etc.

I have bought a switch from Soundlabsgroup.com. They imported it from the UK, and if you Google “SAILES” as the manufacturer, and “SSRV02” as the switch, I’m sure you’ll have all the info you need. This switch has a black box with a button. It is wired to the speedo pulse wire, and at a certain speed, you press the button. This locks that speed into memory. You then wire it into the system so the wheels will auto retract at that speed should you forget to flick the switch. I have not fitted this switch yet, but consider it an important safety device, and intend fitting it before completing the project.

I have found shorter actuators as shown below. Smaller looks better, and I am able to redrill the top mounting hole so the actuator motor faces inwards, making it less intrusive for a passenger’s legs. I am not certain that I will use these actuators yet, as they have only about 125 lb. Lifting power, and the adjustment of travel is handled through a potentiometer, which I have not as yet investigated.

New actuator 1
New actuator 1


New actuator 2
New actuator 2


I have located through http://www.motiontech.com.au/ a pair of actuators that suit very well. They are short, can be used sideways, have adjustable limit switches, and will lift about 600 lb. each. They are also very fast in operation. Unfortunately, they cost about $600 each, however I am so impressed with the helper wheels that I am contemplating buying a pair. If I do, then I will remake my components all from stainless, and add to the glamour of my bike.

Comments on using the helper wheels: I rarely use them when riding, such as at traffic lights etc. I may use them when I first start my ride, just to help balance the bike while I put the kick stand up, and select first gear. From then on, I make sure I’m in low before I pull up anywhere. I will use them again when I want to put the kick stand down. (My right side is my weakest).

But where they come into their own, is moving the bike. Doesn’t matter if I’m sitting on it, or standing beside it, in a gas station, car park, or my garage. Moving all 960 lb. of metal is a breeze. All I need do is push. They are also handy to keep the bike level when checking the oil (I’ve never ever been able to get it on to the centre stand). And I usually leave it on the wheels in the garage, as the bike needs less room when it’s not leaning on the kick stand.

One down side is the snug fit of the footboards in the angle bracket – I can no longer fold the footboards up. Not sure that’s a downside though, as they look much nicer in the down position. I do need to be careful I don’t run a small wheel over my foot while pushing the bike from the side, but you only do that once.
I’m happy to answer any questions you may have, and suggest you ask them here, so others can see the posted reply.

Cheers
Merv Kroll
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linzy II
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Motorcycle: 1987 1200A Goldwing Aspencade

Re: 1200 training wheels

Postby linzy II » Fri Jul 06, 2012 2:53 pm

I have been looking for this form of mechanism, for I also suffer from the Duck disease--(the 29 inch inseam) whereas the tippy toe manuvering becomes some what of a problem even when the air ride is at the lowest level. I'll have to start collecting the stainless together and fire up the heli-arc--Thanx for your input, Linzy II

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mervk
Posts: 85
Joined: Mon Jul 25, 2011 3:51 am
Location: Australia
Motorcycle: 1985 GL1200 LTD
1986 1200 SEI and Trigg Trike kit.
1993 'Black Beauty' 1500 SE and chair.
1993 GL1500 Trike.
+ about 20 bikes from 1914 to current.
Contact:

Re: 1200 training wheels

Postby mervk » Fri Jul 06, 2012 3:45 pm

You'r welcome. If you start the project, let me know, and I can email you a PDF file of the instructions.

Cheers

Merv
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jpwilson3
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Joined: Wed Jan 02, 2013 7:45 pm
Location: Charleston, SC
Motorcycle: 1985 gl1200le

Re: 1200 training wheels

Postby jpwilson3 » Wed Jan 02, 2013 7:54 pm

I have the same problem I have a 23" inseam and this looks easy enough. I will try this mod. Thanks.

John Wilson, III

rogermac
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Motorcycle: 2000 valkeri

Re: 1200 training wheels

Postby rogermac » Thu Jan 03, 2013 4:44 am

merv i live in hervey bay qld am very interested in drop down wheels would it be ok to talk to you about them roger mcdonald email ethelmac@bigpond.com thanks phone no 41248280

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virgilmobile
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Re: 1200 training wheels

Postby virgilmobile » Thu Jan 03, 2013 3:53 pm

Could both extensions be coupled together much like the original centerstand and actuated from a single motor lift???
Or possibly the centerstand its-self retrofitted with this extension.....Just a thought.
Using existing hardware... :geek:

Either way...it's a great idea and a great looking job.
You get my gold star.....for what it's worth.

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eacorbett@yahoo.com
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Re: 1200 training wheels

Postby eacorbett@yahoo.com » Sun Feb 17, 2013 2:01 pm

I think this is an excellent idea and that it could help an enormous amount of people. Something to consider, as it could turn out to be quite beneficial to you, is making a few of these set ups yourself and selling them. As you said they just aren't made for our bikes. Not to many can weld and if so some might not be able to weld well enough to pull this modification off. Myself being one of those people. I have an 85 GL 1200L same as yours. I am fairly young and can still handle the bike fairly well. So not quite in need of this set up as of yet, but I am not getting any younger and live on a road where these would come in very handy to get into and out of my property. I live in the US and international shipping through a well known shipper should not be a huge deal. This can give you something to do in your spare time or maybe even a full time job in itself depending on how many people want this set up. And as you said you can make it out of different materials to make it look nice. I personally would prefer the original steel which can be powder coated or painted here in the states. Having the same bike you are quite aware the there is already an enormous amount of chrome on these bikes. I am one to want to ride it more than clean it more. It is a very nice looking bike when clean, but getting there takes way to much time. Just an idea. I think you have the chance to be able to help others that are not in a position to help themselves. Love the idea, think a better location for the actuators would help as well as they detract form the appearance of the over all bike. Suppose there has to be something you have to give up for the convience though.

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mervk
Posts: 85
Joined: Mon Jul 25, 2011 3:51 am
Location: Australia
Motorcycle: 1985 GL1200 LTD
1986 1200 SEI and Trigg Trike kit.
1993 'Black Beauty' 1500 SE and chair.
1993 GL1500 Trike.
+ about 20 bikes from 1914 to current.
Contact:

Re: 1200 training wheels

Postby mervk » Sat Apr 06, 2013 5:26 am

As the hips deteriorate, so more support is needed, so I have now gone to a Trigg Trike kit, giving support for the bike at all times. The wheels I designed worked well, and allowed me to feel what it was like to ride an unfettered Goldy for a while. Now, the Trigg kit will allow me to continue riding it. So the full set as shown in the installation article is available for sale to anyone who may be able to use them. Asking $500. Email at merv@kroll.id.au.

Cheers

Merv
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Merv Kroll
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eacorbett@yahoo.com
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Re: 1200 training wheels

Postby eacorbett@yahoo.com » Wed Apr 10, 2013 7:20 am

Merv, I absolutely love the 1200L with that trike kit!!! That is AWESOME!! The painted to match fenders / tail piece! The wheels look good with it too! I am assuming that with the factory hard bags still installed that this is a add a trike kit which retains the the bags and the rear wheel?! I have seen similar kits available over here in the states, but are costly. Approximately $4000 US dollars. The good thing is that they are easily installed and removed in about an hours time. The down fall is the price and having to have the kit painted to match and does not come with the same style rear cover that you have on yours. You have a VERY good looking bike there brother! I envy you! :) Wish I had your kit on my 85 GL 1200 L! Keep that Wing looking good! Ride safe, be well and take care brother. And remember to always keep the rubber side facing down!

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eacorbett@yahoo.com
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Re: 1200 training wheels

Postby eacorbett@yahoo.com » Wed Apr 10, 2013 7:35 am

Merv, when you get tired of that 85 Wing and you want to get rid of it you can ship it to me over here in the states, free of charge of course, and I will take excellent care of it! :D :D :D :D

DWKENT
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Re: 1200 training wheels

Postby DWKENT » Sun Apr 21, 2013 11:13 am

Merv, thanks for the information and the inititive to solve a problem. I bought a 1986 Goldwing SE-I last October and realized the bike was way too heavy for me. I had a 1979 Goldwing many years ago and it was a dream. Now I am 67 years old and not quite the man I was 35 years ago. I was thinking of getting a new Honda CTX 700 which is coming out this summer (2014), but it was a chain drive with a parrallel design. The benefits are that it weighs less than 500 lbs and the seat height is 28". I may put off getting the CTX as I like the horizon opposed engine (keeps the center of gravity low) and the shaft drive. I wish honda would make a 600-800 with a boxer engine and shaft drive, a full fairing, speedometer, tach, brakes and clutch. Simple, not heavy and nothing exotic. Hope are are still riding and enjoying your bike. Dave

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mervk
Posts: 85
Joined: Mon Jul 25, 2011 3:51 am
Location: Australia
Motorcycle: 1985 GL1200 LTD
1986 1200 SEI and Trigg Trike kit.
1993 'Black Beauty' 1500 SE and chair.
1993 GL1500 Trike.
+ about 20 bikes from 1914 to current.
Contact:

Re: 1200 training wheels

Postby mervk » Sun Apr 21, 2013 5:35 pm

Hi Dave, yes, I hope to keep riding until I depart this life, it's just about altering my riding style as time goes by. I now have a Trigg kit fitted to the 85 1200, and I truly love it. Had a good run on it yesterday, and I am still smiling! I have a CSC sidecar fitted to my 1500, and it is also a joy to ride. I have just bought a CB750 1979 model, and will use it to keep on two wheels for a while longer. And if I can raise the funds, and convince them to export one, I will work on getting a new 1800 GW with a Tilster tilting trike kit from Mystery Designs in Texas.

I have ridden bikes in one form or another now for 50 years, and it's nice to know that when I go for a haircut today, the biggest decision I will have to make is which bike to enjoy on the visit to the barber.

If you take enough pain killers, and accept three wheels, old age can be great, and can keep getting better. Check out my 1500 at www.kroll.id.au

Cheers

Merv
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Merv Kroll
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mantree
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Joined: Sun Aug 18, 2013 1:18 pm
Location: Fort Collins, Colorado
Motorcycle: 95 vt1100

Re: 1200 training wheels

Postby mantree » Sun Aug 18, 2013 1:35 pm

This is great. Last year i was involved in a bad wreck last year leaving me with a lump of flesh where my right foot use to be making it hard to ride a bike. I'M going to buy a new bike next year and I'd love to build a set might be a wing or might be a shadow I'd love to get a set of your design sketches

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mervk
Posts: 85
Joined: Mon Jul 25, 2011 3:51 am
Location: Australia
Motorcycle: 1985 GL1200 LTD
1986 1200 SEI and Trigg Trike kit.
1993 'Black Beauty' 1500 SE and chair.
1993 GL1500 Trike.
+ about 20 bikes from 1914 to current.
Contact:

Re: 1200 training wheels

Postby mervk » Sun Aug 18, 2013 4:37 pm

Hi Mantree, how's Fort Collins? Visited there twice over the last few years, both times in my 1926 Model T Ford. If you'd like the PDF of how I built them, I need an email address.

Cheers.
Merv Kroll
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mryan60
Posts: 3
Joined: Thu Jun 18, 2015 8:22 pm
Location: Caro, Micgigan
Motorcycle: 1985 GL1200L Limited

Re: 1200 training wheels

Postby mryan60 » Thu Jun 18, 2015 9:08 pm

If you still have these plans, how can I get them?

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mervk
Posts: 85
Joined: Mon Jul 25, 2011 3:51 am
Location: Australia
Motorcycle: 1985 GL1200 LTD
1986 1200 SEI and Trigg Trike kit.
1993 'Black Beauty' 1500 SE and chair.
1993 GL1500 Trike.
+ about 20 bikes from 1914 to current.
Contact:

Re: 1200 training wheels

Postby mervk » Thu Jun 18, 2015 10:34 pm

Email me at merv@kroll.id.au and I'll be happy to email them back to you.

Cheers


Merv Kroll
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