Replacing REAR Brake Pads on a '78 GL1000


Step-by-step tutorials on how to maintain and fix your GL1000
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Mean Wing
Posts: 33
Joined: Mon Aug 31, 2015 9:46 am
Location: Fayetteville, GA
Motorcycle: 1978 Honda GL1000 (K3)
2002 Honda GL1800

Replacing REAR Brake Pads on a '78 GL1000

Postby Mean Wing » Sun Aug 07, 2016 8:09 am



To begin this process, see my Removing REAR Tire & Replacing Brake Pads on a '78 GL1000 post first. This will assist you in getting the rear tire off the bike and out of the way. NOTE: Do not disconnect the hydraulic line!

1. Remove black plastic brake pad inspection cover, on top of the brake assembly. This cover just snaps into place, held in by some tabs.

2. From the right side of the bike, and with the Brake Caliper assembly turned on its side, remove the two (2) side bolts that hold the two halves of the calipers together.


3. Lift off right brake pad caliper assembly (side with bleeder valve). The hole at the top right is how fluid transfers from the hydraulic line half to the bleeder valve half. CAUTION: Both halves contain residual DOT 3 brake fluid. Do not let this fluid leak onto painted surfaces or plastic parts!


4. Note the position and direction of the brake pad assembly and its components, so as not to replace them incorrectly. Slide the entire brake pad assembly (and slider pins) out of the left caliper.


5. Wipe dust and dirt from the caliper (piston) halves. Do not damage the black rubber dust boot (ring)! Check for signs of leakage around the boot. If the rubber boot is cracked or leaking, completely disassemble and inspect the caliper assembly for damage.

6. Using a "C-clamp" and one of the old brake pads, push the pistons completely back into their bores. On the right half, open bleeder valve as necessary. CAUTION: DOT 3 brake fluid will be released through the transfer holes of each half when you begin to apply pressure to the respective pistons! Cover this area with an old rag so the the fluid does not squirt out and onto painted or plastic surfaces.


7. Using #0 steel wool, or fine sand paper, clean the slider pins until they are smooth and shiny, then coat them with high-temp automotive grease. Reassemble the brake pad assembly with the new pads. In my case, I purchased a set of EBC FA32 Organic Brake pads online.


8. Install the brake pad assembly into the left caliper body. Install right caliper assembly and secure with the retaining bolts. Install black plastic pad inspection cover. Install rear wheel and brake caliper assembly onto disc. Flush or bleed rear brake system reservoir. CAUTION: It may take up to 1,000 miles of driving before new brake pads have contoured to ridges in the disc, making them less effective for a time.



unkle buckie
Posts: 11
Joined: Fri Jul 25, 2014 12:36 am
Location: Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
Motorcycle: 1979 GL 1000

Re: Replacing REAR Brake Pads on a '78 GL1000

Postby unkle buckie » Sat Oct 01, 2016 10:53 am

great article, very helpful. just did mine with the rear wheel in place, but if i'd read your other article first to see how easy rear wheel removal was...

User avatar
Mean Wing
Posts: 33
Joined: Mon Aug 31, 2015 9:46 am
Location: Fayetteville, GA
Motorcycle: 1978 Honda GL1000 (K3)
2002 Honda GL1800

Re: Replacing REAR Brake Pads on a '78 GL1000

Postby Mean Wing » Sat Oct 01, 2016 5:19 pm

Unkle Buckie,

Glad it helped! Unlike most members of this site, I need all the assistance I can get (i.e., new to motorcycle maintenance and mechanics). So, as I attempt new tasks, my goal is to pass on what I've learned . . . :D

unkle buckie
Posts: 11
Joined: Fri Jul 25, 2014 12:36 am
Location: Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
Motorcycle: 1979 GL 1000

Re: Replacing REAR Brake Pads on a '78 GL1000

Postby unkle buckie » Sat Oct 01, 2016 9:34 pm

very noble of you mate. good for you. i'm in a similar position, mechanic wise. i've cleaned more bikes than i've worked on, but there was just something about this old gal ('79 gl1000) that made me want to get 'hands on.' been a few bloody knuckles as a consequence, but knowing that i've done it because of the advice (and the time taken to explain,) by the people on this site and others like it, gives me an enormous sensation of personal satisfaction. i feel more competent diagnosing too, because i can check through the wealth of info available. not everyone was born with a spanner in their hands, or had a dad available, so on their collective behalf, cheers !




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