How to replace your fuel filter


Step-by-step tutorials on how to maintain and fix your GL1500
  • Sponsored Links
User avatar
WingAdmin
Site Admin
Posts: 17050
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 4:16 pm
Location: Strongsville, OH
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1982 GL1100A Aspencade (sold)
1989 PC800 (wife's!)
1998 XV250 Virago (sold)
2007 Aspen Sentry Trailer

How to replace your fuel filter

Postby WingAdmin » Tue May 01, 2012 10:44 am



Changing your fuel filter is a fairly simple task. It is a regular maintenance item, and is a good way to protect your delicate and expensive-to-overhaul carburetors - especially with the constantly-declining quality of gasoline we are forced to use nowadays.

You have a few choices when it comes to fuel filters. OEM Honda replacement fuel filters can be found for $15 from Cyclemax. Until recently, I used Emgo fuel filters, which were a perfect replacement for the Honda filters, and were available for just a few dollars. However, as detailed in this thread about Emgo fuel filter failures, they have had serious quality control problems of late, and some resellers have reported that they have stopped making them. I am replacing the Emgo fuel filter on this bike with an OEM Honda fuel filter.

IMPORTANT: It should be obvious, but working with the fuel system will expose you to fuel and fuel vapors, which are flammable/explosive. There should be no sources of ignition (cigarettes, pilot flames, sparks, etc) anywhere in your work area, and there should be good ventilation at all times.

To get to the area we will be working on, we will first be removing the seat, which you should be familiar with. If you have never performed this procedure before, see How to remove and replace your seat.

1. We will be removing the radio shelter from the bike to access the fuel filter. It's probably possible (but difficult) to get the filter out simply by opening the fuel filler door, but you will end up spilling fuel down the inside of your bike. Start by removing the soft cover from the left fairing pocket, then remove the four screws holding the pocket in place.

Image

2. Lift the pocket out of the fairing. If your pocket has a 12 volt outlet in it, you may need to disconnect it - or just let the pocket hang out the side by the wires.

Image

3. Unlock and remove the hard cover from the right fairing pocket.

Image

4. Remove the four screws holding the right fairing pocket in place.

Image

5. If your GL1500 is an SE, you will have a knob for the foot warmers. You'll need to remove the set screw for this knob, then pull the knob off in order to get the pocket out.

Image

6. Remove the pocket from the fairing.

Image

7. Remove the ignition switch cover by gently pulling up at the bottom as shown until the posts disengage from the rubber grommets. Then release the tabs at the top and remove the cover.

Image

8. Remove the left top inner cover by pulling the tab free at the rightmost edge as shown.

Image

9. Follow by pulling each tab free in sequence until you get to the front tab.

Image

10. This tab locks in place - be careful not to break it. Next, remove the right top inner cover the same way as you removed the left side.

Image

11. Open the fuel filler door and identify the two plastic locking tabs near the front of the opening.

Image

12. Rotate the tabs as shown to unlock the radio shelter.

Image

13. Using a 10mm wrench or socket, remove the two acorn nuts holding the back end of the radio shelter in place.

Image

14. Lift the back end of the radio shelter free of the studs.

Image

15. Release the tabs at the front left and right sides of the radio shelter from the fairing.

Image

16. Lift the radio shelter - you will see the wires that connect the radio to the motorcycle. Carefully turn the radio shelter upside down.

Image

17. Lift the rubber boot to expose the connectors for the radio.

Image

18. Depress the locking tabs on each connector and pull it free from the radio. Pull on the connector, never on the wires! The antenna (round wire) does not have a locking tab, it just pulls free.

Image

19. Remove the radio shelter from the bike. and set it down on a soft surface, such as a carpet.

Image

20. Pull the rubber retaining strap free of the bike to loosen the filter. Put a shop towel underneath the filter to catch any spilled fuel (and there will be some). Using needle nose pliers, squeeze the hose clamps as shown, and slide them down the fuel lines away from the filter.

Image

21. With a gently pulling and twisting motion, pull the fuel lines free of the filter, one at a time. Be prepared for a small amount fuel to spill from the filter and/or the fuel lines when they are removed.

Image

22. Pull the rubber retaining strap from the old fuel filter and place it onto the new filter. Note the arrow on the outside of the filter casing, indicating the correct fuel flow direction. This arrow should point to the front of the bike when the filter is installed.

Image

23. Push the fuel lines onto the new filter, making sure they are pushed on all the way. Using needle nose pliers, move the hose clamps back to their original position. Clean up any spilled fuel. Put a fresh towel under the new filter, and start the motorcycle. Let it run for several minutes, closely examining the fuel lines and new filter for any leakage. If all is well, remove the towel and refasten the rubber retaining strap to its stay.

IMPORTANT: Do not leave fuel-soaked rags sitting around inside your work area, and do not just throw them away! Take them outside and let them dry before disposing of them!

Image

24. You may wish to cut open the old filter to examine its state. With a sharp knife, cut carefully around the base of the filter, and pull it apart.

Image

25. The filter I removed from this bike was an Emgo filter. As has been documented elsewhere, the adhesive mounting the filter media to the filter itself had failed and crumbled, and the filter media was no longer fastened to the filter housing.

Image

26. Return to the motorcycle, and with the shelter inverted, carefully snap each connector back into place. Make sure the antenna connector is securely fastened. Don't forget to connect the ground lead (if equipped).

Image

27. Pull the rubber boot down over the connectors, and make sure it is held in place over the tab in the metal bottom of the radio.

Image

28. Flip the radio shelter right side up and position it in place. Make sure the front tabs go into their slots at the front of the fairing.

Image

29. Lower the radio shelter over the studs.

Image

30. Make sure the locking tabs are still in the inward (unlocked position).

Image

31. Replace and tighten the acorn nuts to hold the shelter in place.

Image

32. Now rotate the locking tabs outward to lock the shelter in place.

Image

33. Insert the front tab of each inner cover into the dashboard.

Image

34. Gradually work around each inner cover starting at the front and working your way around to the inner back, putting each tab into its slot.

Image

35. Replace the ignition cover by inserting the front tabs into their slots, then rotating the back down into place, pushing the posts into their grommets.

Image

36. Replace the right fairing pocket and screw it into place.

Image

37. If equipped, reinstall the foot warmer knob and its set screw.

Image

38. Reinstall the left fairing pocket and screw it into place. Make sure the intercom lead wire is positioned correctly in the pass-through before screwing it into place.

Image



User avatar
Maddogg
Posts: 150
Joined: Sun Aug 25, 2013 6:58 pm
Location: Fresno, ca.
Motorcycle: 1990 GL1500
1994 Suzuki 800 Intruder

Re: How to replace your fuel filter

Postby Maddogg » Thu Sep 12, 2013 9:21 pm

My filter is just inside the fuel door. It is visable on the right hand side. I was just wondering why you were taking everything apart to get to it.

Whit3B3ard
Posts: 2
Joined: Thu Aug 22, 2013 10:07 am
Location: Dayton, Ohio
Motorcycle: 1988 GL1500

Re: How to replace your fuel filter

Postby Whit3B3ard » Wed Oct 09, 2013 2:28 pm

Maddogg wrote:My filter is just inside the fuel door. It is visable on the right hand side. I was just wondering why you were taking everything apart to get to it.

WingAdmin wrote:1. We will be removing the radio shelter from the bike to access the fuel filter. It's probably possible (but difficult) to get the filter out simply by opening the fuel filler door, but you will end up spilling fuel down the inside of your bike.

User avatar
WingAdmin
Site Admin
Posts: 17050
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 4:16 pm
Location: Strongsville, OH
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1982 GL1100A Aspencade (sold)
1989 PC800 (wife's!)
1998 XV250 Virago (sold)
2007 Aspen Sentry Trailer

Re: How to replace your fuel filter

Postby WingAdmin » Sun Jul 20, 2014 9:29 pm

I replaced the fuel filter on my GL1500 today, the one in there had 13,000 miles on it. As I mentioned, it was a Honda OEM filter, and I wanted to have a look at its condition. Once I removed it, I cut it open. The filter media was cemented in place, it definitely was not going anywhere. The cap as well was glued solidly in place.

Honda fuel filter cut open
Honda fuel filter cut open


I cut the media off to examine it for foreign dirt or particles. I found a little bit of dirt, and some tiny (almost microscopic) bits of metal, but nothing to worry about. I'm confident that the Honda OEM filter did its job correctly.

Fuel filter media
Fuel filter media

User avatar
Ol' Man
Posts: 67
Joined: Fri Oct 11, 2013 7:14 pm
Location: Bettendorf, IA
Motorcycle: 1996 GL1500A/MotorTrike Conversion

Re: How to replace your fuel filter

Postby Ol' Man » Sun Sep 21, 2014 10:59 am

First, I am completely at a loss when it comes to my experience with motorcycle maintenance as I have always had it done by the pros. I have a '96 GL1500A that has been triked by Motor Trike. I purchased it last year and have no knowledge of past maintenance schedule other than it had been gone over by the installer prior to my purchase. I had an incident at highway speed where the trike suddenly slowed like it had no power for a quarter mile or so then snapped out of it. I decided to tackle changing the fuel filter following your instructions. When they came to removing the acorn nuts, I had to first remove the seat to gain access. That step wasn't specified in your tutorial unless the trike version is different. Other than that the operation went fairly smooth for a 77 yr old geezer. :D Great job with the instructions.
Today is the oldest you've ever been,
yet the youngest you'll ever be,
so enjoy this day while it lasts.

User avatar
WingAdmin
Site Admin
Posts: 17050
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 4:16 pm
Location: Strongsville, OH
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1982 GL1100A Aspencade (sold)
1989 PC800 (wife's!)
1998 XV250 Virago (sold)
2007 Aspen Sentry Trailer

Re: How to replace your fuel filter

Postby WingAdmin » Mon Sep 22, 2014 10:07 am

Ol' Man wrote:First, I am completely at a loss when it comes to my experience with motorcycle maintenance as I have always had it done by the pros. I have a '96 GL1500A that has been triked by Motor Trike. I purchased it last year and have no knowledge of past maintenance schedule other than it had been gone over by the installer prior to my purchase. I had an incident at highway speed where the trike suddenly slowed like it had no power for a quarter mile or so then snapped out of it. I decided to tackle changing the fuel filter following your instructions. When they came to removing the acorn nuts, I had to first remove the seat to gain access. That step wasn't specified in your tutorial unless the trike version is different. Other than that the operation went fairly smooth for a 77 yr old geezer. :D Great job with the instructions.


Yep, you're 100% correct - I left the seat step out. I added the following:

To get to the area we will be working on, we will first be removing the seat, which you should be familiar with. If you have never performed this procedure before, see How to remove and replace your seat.


Good for you for tackling the job yourself (and succeeding!).

papaM11945
Posts: 12
Joined: Sat Feb 13, 2010 9:43 pm
Location: Eureka, CA
Motorcycle: 1991 Goldwing GL 1500 se

Re: How to replace your fuel filter

Postby papaM11945 » Tue Jan 20, 2015 11:08 pm

I decided to try it the easy way. I mean it was just sitting there begging me to reach in and change it without removing all that "stuff". All you need is (1) patience (2) good needle nose pliers and (3) [and this is the secrete], silicone spray. The spray lets the squeeze clamps slide away from the filter ends. I also removed the seat so I could better maneuver the gas line. Job done.

User avatar
Keef
Posts: 141
Joined: Fri Sep 07, 2012 4:46 pm
Location: sanford nc
Motorcycle: 1997 gl1500 Aspencade

Re: How to replace your fuel filter

Postby Keef » Fri Jan 15, 2016 8:43 am

Question, I was looking at the picture of the gas cap and noticed it was upside down. Does it matter which way it is on there?
There's that little triangle on it that leads me to believe it should be pointing up?
Does any one know for sure?

Thanks

User avatar
WingAdmin
Site Admin
Posts: 17050
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 4:16 pm
Location: Strongsville, OH
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1982 GL1100A Aspencade (sold)
1989 PC800 (wife's!)
1998 XV250 Virago (sold)
2007 Aspen Sentry Trailer

Re: How to replace your fuel filter

Postby WingAdmin » Fri Jan 15, 2016 5:16 pm

Keef wrote:Question, I was looking at the picture of the gas cap and noticed it was upside down. Does it matter which way it is on there?
There's that little triangle on it that leads me to believe it should be pointing up?
Does any one know for sure?

Thanks


No, it makes absolutely no difference.




Return to “GL1500 DIY Articles”




Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests