Tippy side stand


Technical information and Q&A applicable to all years and models of Goldwings
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RoadDawg
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Tippy side stand

Postby RoadDawg » Thu Mar 13, 2014 8:50 am



As most of you know, the GoldWing stands pretty upright when the kickstand is down. This can be somewhat difficult when the road is uneven or slightly higher on the left side meaning the bike can easily tip to the right. Yes....one could park in a different spot but often this is not possible especially if you pull over to the side of the road and need to put your kickstand down for a moment...the road portion is usually a little higher than the portion off of the road.

With that said, it sure would be nice if Honda developed a kick stand that either allowed the bike to tilt a little further to the left while on the kickstand and also to have it swing a little further forward since it does not take much to push the bike off the kick stand. Harley has a really stable kickstand that tilts the bike further and more forward, but hey...its not a Honda. :shock: Now Honda being Honda really don't seem to listen to the requests of its riders so I am wondering if any of you have come up with a better solution to stabilize the kickstand in these particular instances. I have seen small pads that you can add to the bottom of the kickstand but they only seem to make the kickstand when down, higher meaning it is even more tippy.

Likely a somewhat goofy request, but figured I would ask.

Thanks in advance for your comments.



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Re: Tippy side stand

Postby Dogsled » Thu Mar 13, 2014 9:06 am

if you're that uncomfortable with the stance (mine goes over too far) use a torch and get a spot red hot and let the bike weight on it while holding it until you get the stance a little lower. A little bit goes a long way. You could always bend it back.
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Re: Tippy side stand

Postby WingAdmin » Thu Mar 13, 2014 10:23 am

Dogsled wrote:if you're that uncomfortable with the stance (mine goes over too far) use a torch and get a spot red hot and let the bike weight on it while holding it until you get the stance a little lower. A little bit goes a long way. You could always bend it back.


I lowered my wife's PC800 as she is rather short in stature, and one of the side effects was that the kickstand had the bike sitting up too upright. I thought about heating and bending the kickstand, but I really didn't want to weaken the metal or cause it to become brittle (which can happen from heating). Instead, I took the kickstand off, and used a grinder to take a tiny bit of metal off the kickstand bracket right where the kickstand touched it when fully extended. This allowed the kickstand to be extended about an inch further forward, and was more than enough to have the bike lean more to the left when on the kickstand.

If I ever wanted to reverse it, I could easily lay a bead of weld where I ground the metal away.

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Re: Tippy side stand

Postby Dogsled » Thu Mar 13, 2014 11:33 am

Scott if you let the metal cool slowly, even wrap it, it will be just a strong. Wet rags with cold water can cause brittleness. But even in that case I don't think you're in the weight range or extreme impact situation to have it snap.

With my way you don't have to take anything off and you can see how far you are going over and get it perfect.
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Re: Tippy side stand

Postby Dusty Boots » Thu Mar 13, 2014 1:04 pm

Ken ... are you running a car tire on the rear (some will lower the ride height of the bike, aggravating the condition you describe) or running a regular OEM type tire?
If running a OEM type tire, you might want to switch to a 70 series tire the next time you need a new rear tire, as the increased sidewall height will cause more of an agreeable lean angle. It might throw your speedo out if you have a newer 1800, but I know the earlier 1800s were overly optimistic and the 70 series tire was a cheap cure to correct that

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Re: Tippy side stand

Postby RoadDawg » Thu Mar 13, 2014 3:04 pm

Thank you everyone for the information.... you folks are always so helpful... and no I'm not running a car tire on the back.

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Re: Tippy side stand

Postby themainviking » Fri Mar 14, 2014 8:17 am

As I almost always put a parking plate under the side stand, I run into this situation more often than not. I like the idea of just grinding a tad off the bottom or top, especially at the top, if it allows the side stand to go a bit further forward. Being used to Harley sidestands that notch into place, I find the Honda roll off the side stand application to be a scary proposition. Someone should invent a functioning side stand for the Goldwing that notches and prevents roll off. As I am not an inventor, it won't be me, but if anyone does, or knows of it being done, I would contribute money by buying same. Perhaps not possible due to the side stand switch.
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Re: Tippy side stand

Postby WingAdmin » Fri Mar 14, 2014 9:33 am

themainviking wrote:As I almost always put a parking plate under the side stand, I run into this situation more often than not. I like the idea of just grinding a tad off the bottom or top, especially at the top, if it allows the side stand to go a bit further forward. Being used to Harley sidestands that notch into place, I find the Honda roll off the side stand application to be a scary proposition. Someone should invent a functioning side stand for the Goldwing that notches and prevents roll off. As I am not an inventor, it won't be me, but if anyone does, or knows of it being done, I would contribute money by buying same. Perhaps not possible due to the side stand switch.


Anytime I park my bike and I have the slightest suspicion that it might roll off, I first shift into reverse, then shut the bike off and lean it over on the side stand. With reverse engaged, the rear wheel is not going ANYWHERE, and will keep the bike from rolling forward or backward.

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Re: Tippy side stand

Postby RoadDawg » Fri Mar 14, 2014 9:47 am

WingAdmin wrote:
themainviking wrote:As I almost always put a parking plate under the side stand, I run into this situation more often than not. I like the idea of just grinding a tad off the bottom or top, especially at the top, if it allows the side stand to go a bit further forward. Being used to Harley sidestands that notch into place, I find the Honda roll off the side stand application to be a scary proposition. Someone should invent a functioning side stand for the Goldwing that notches and prevents roll off. As I am not an inventor, it won't be me, but if anyone does, or knows of it being done, I would contribute money by buying same. Perhaps not possible due to the side stand switch.


Anytime I park my bike and I have the slightest suspicion that it might roll off, I first shift into reverse, then shut the bike off and lean it over on the side stand. With reverse engaged, the rear wheel is not going ANYWHERE, and will keep the bike from rolling forward or backward.


Good points...I always do something similar....every time I stop my bike I put it in gear, switch it off, and rock the bike forward a little until the gears fully mesh or the bike will not roll forward any further. I have found if you just put it in gear and not rock it forward there can still be a little movement especially if the bike is facing downhill a little and since the stands on the Wing don't have much tolerance for movement, this can create a problem.

Although we are getting a little off topic here, when you are on a ferry and coming into a landing area, it is advisable that you leave your bike on the kickstand, bike off, in gear, rocked forward and only start it when the ferry is fully docked and stable. I have seen riders in front of me put their bikes upright, start them, put them in neutral as the ferry was landing and when the ferry hit the docking area their bikes rocked forward and tipped over onto bikes beside them. It was not a pleasant sight to witness.

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Re: Tippy side stand

Postby Dogsled » Fri Mar 14, 2014 11:57 am

Dang RoadDawg who woulda ever thought of that. I'm goin to Nova Scotia this year and need to take a ferry...............THANKS
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Re: Tippy side stand

Postby RoadDawg » Fri Mar 14, 2014 12:04 pm

Dogsled wrote:Dang RoadDawg who woulda ever thought of that. I'm goin to Nova Scotia this year and need to take a ferry...............THANKS


Sorry...now really getting off topic, but hey....... :lol: I now always carry some straps to tie down my bike while on a ferry ride over rough water...often the ferry companies will provide them but when I was traversing with the ferry to the Outer Banks this summer I could have used them as they were not provided. Instead, I had to stand by my bike for 2 hours to keep it from tipping over. Check with the ferry companies. Nova Scotia is wonderful by the way.....I was born there...awesome roads...incredible scenery....very welcoming people.

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Re: Tippy side stand

Postby Dogsled » Fri Mar 14, 2014 12:31 pm

I don't think we're off topic......talking about the pros and cons of kickstands. Leaning a kickstand over to a safe angle is all related to where you are parked. Everyone is gonna have their own way of what is the RIGHT WAY, they all work. It just depends on what you are capable of doing.

Heck,i've fallen over while sitting at a red light!!!!!!
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Re: Tippy side stand

Postby themainviking » Fri Mar 14, 2014 2:25 pm

Dogsled wrote:Heck,i've fallen over while sitting at a red light!!!!!!


Now that must be an interesting story - in fact worthy of it's own thread. I also put my bike in gear when faced down hill, as if it is going to roll OFF the sidestand, that is the direction that would do the trick. I worry a lot less when facing up the hill. If I intend to use ferries, I always carry tie downs, as the last time I used a ferry with a motorcycle, the crew offered me these honkin' huge dirty ropes.
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Re: Tippy side stand

Postby Dogsled » Fri Mar 14, 2014 2:57 pm

Hey if I can fall off my bike.......by mistake......... I still need to know how Scott can park his bike in 'REVERSE'...... I mean we came out of the same library and out eyes were both a little weary........ I fell down, I don't know how he found an imaginary gear??????????????? hahahahahahahahahahahahahaha AIN'T MOCYCLES FUN....til one falls on your ankle.......tru dat
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Re: Tippy side stand

Postby MikeB » Fri Mar 14, 2014 11:40 pm

Wingadmin wrote
Anytime I park my bike and I have the slightest suspicion that it might roll off, I first shift into reverse, then shut the bike off and lean it over on the side stand. With reverse engaged, the rear wheel is not going ANYWHERE, and will keep the bike from rolling forward or backward.

Read more: posting.php?mode=reply&f=16&t=20967#ixzz2w0EaymDT

I don't believe it is recommended that you use reverse when leaving the GL1500 parked. At least that is what I have read in a Wing World Tech article some time ago. It is recommended that if you shift into 1st gear to help hold your motorcycle in position while parked. The engine is much better suited to take the load than the starter motor.
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Re: Tippy side stand

Postby lhelber » Sat Mar 15, 2014 6:37 am

Getting back to reverse, the other day I was moving my 1800 around in the garage and it was making a strange noise. I noticed I had left it in reverse. I was able to move it easily enough so I wouldn't want to use it for parking. For both my 1100 and 1800 I just leave it in gear when I stop to prevent it from moving. I used to do that with all of my standard transmission cars too. I am not familiar with the reverse on the 1500 to know how its reverse works.

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Re: Tippy side stand

Postby WingAdmin » Mon Mar 17, 2014 8:22 am

The difference between parking in reverse and parking in first gear when on an incline: In first gear, it is engine compression that is holding the bike in place. Are you 100% sure that whichever cylinder it is that is currently being compressed is in perfect shape, and won't bleed off pressure while you're away from your bike? Leaky rings? Leaky valves? When that pressure bleeds off, the force holding your bike in place goes away too.

Reverse, on the other hand, uses an extreme mechanical advantage to allow the fast spinning starter/reverse motor to turn the rear wheel extremely slowly. Working that in reverse means it is extremely difficult if not impossible to move the bike while it is in reverse.

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Re: Tippy side stand

Postby MikeB » Mon Mar 17, 2014 9:20 am

Sorry Admin but this is one time I must disagree.
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Re: Tippy side stand

Postby Dogsled » Mon Mar 17, 2014 11:34 am

I was under the assumption that reverse was an electrical performance and not mechancial like a piston or valve and compression.....

What exactly happens when you throw that reverse lever and the bike isn't running ? ? ?

GOOD TOPIC on its own.
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Re: Tippy side stand

Postby WingAdmin » Mon Mar 17, 2014 11:45 am

Dogsled wrote:I was under the assumption that reverse was an electrical performance and not mechancial like a piston or valve and compression.....

What exactly happens when you throw that reverse lever and the bike isn't running ? ? ?

GOOD TOPIC on its own.


When the reverse lever is pulled, it disconnects the final output drive from the transmission, and instead connects it to a set of reduction gears. The reduction gears are connected to the starter motor.

These reduction gears, along with the planetary gearset inside the starter itself, mean that the starter has to spin at a very high speed, while the rear wheel turns at a very low speed. There is no realistic way for the wheel to turn the starter motor - the mechanical advantage conferred by the reduction gearsets mean there is just too much leverage for it to overcome.

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Re: Tippy side stand

Postby lhelber » Mon Mar 17, 2014 1:06 pm

I can see your point with the 1500. The reverse lever is connected to a cable so I assume it is a mechanical connection to engage the gears. I this case I can see how the reverse would lockup the rear wheel. On the 1800s the reverse engagement is a switch next to the start button and the meshing of the reverse gears may not be activated with the power off. That may be the reason why I was able to move my bike around with the reverse button turned on.

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Re: Tippy side stand

Postby WingAdmin » Mon Mar 17, 2014 2:26 pm

lhelber wrote:I can see your point with the 1500. The reverse lever is connected to a cable so I assume it is a mechanical connection to engage the gears. I this case I can see how the reverse would lockup the rear wheel. On the 1800s the reverse engagement is a switch next to the start button and the meshing of the reverse gears may not be activated with the power off. That may be the reason why I was able to move my bike around with the reverse button turned on.


Correct, it is a pair of cables connected to the lever on the side that actuate the gears directly.

On the 1800, it still uses a pair of cables, however instead of being actuated by a lever that you pull, it is actuated by an electric motor. The electric motor is controlled by the reverse switch, and will only operate when there is a key in the ignition. For this reason, some GL1800 owners will switch into reverse before shutting the bike off as a theft deterrent. You can't roll the bike around while it is in reverse, and the only way to get it out of reverse is to switch the bike on using the key in the ignition.

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Re: Tippy side stand

Postby RoadDawg » Mon Mar 17, 2014 2:37 pm

Good tip for the theft deterrent for the 1800's...I never knew that.... so I guess if I see some person backing my Wing down the road I will know he or she is stealing it :lol:

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Re: Tippy side stand

Postby NebraskaHick » Tue Mar 18, 2014 7:19 pm

My project bike ('88 1500) is on my car lift right now. Just went out, verified it is in neutral, then pulled the reverse lever. Rear tire won't move either direction.

No, I'm not from Missouri, but close! :D

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Re: Tippy side stand

Postby MikeB » Sat Jan 24, 2015 5:02 pm

WingAdmin wrote:The difference between parking in reverse and parking in first gear when on an incline: In first gear, it is engine compression that is holding the bike in place. Are you 100% sure that whichever cylinder it is that is currently being compressed is in perfect shape, and won't bleed off pressure while you're away from your bike? Leaky rings? Leaky valves? When that pressure bleeds off, the force holding your bike in place goes away too.

Reverse, on the other hand, uses an extreme mechanical advantage to allow the fast spinning starter/reverse motor to turn the rear wheel extremely slowly. Working that in reverse means it is extremely difficult if not impossible to move the bike while it is in reverse.


In the February 2015 Wing World magazine the Senior Technical Editor, Stu Oltman in WORKBENCH once again briefly explains that using Reverse for parking your wing is not a good idea. See page 037, bottom right hand corner of the page.


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