tire change


Technical information and Q&A applicable to all years and models of Goldwings
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bworth_2
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tire change

Postby bworth_2 » Sat Feb 07, 2015 2:46 pm



the internet has good prices on tires for my 2008 Goldwing. however no shops will change the tires for me. how hard is it to change them myself,$200 for the shop to change them, that jus sounds a bit pricey to me.



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dnehasert
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Re: tire change

Postby dnehasert » Sat Feb 07, 2015 3:38 pm

If you remove the wheels from your bike , most shops charge $15-$30 to intall and balance . A small shop is usually cheaper than a Honda dealer . Doug

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mweddy@gmail.com
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Re: tire change

Postby mweddy@gmail.com » Sun Feb 08, 2015 10:03 pm

For less than $100 when on sale, you can get a tire machine from Harbor Freight. I've used mine for motorcycle and automobile tires. (Car tires are easier). I've even used it to install car tires on motorcycle rims. Changing tires is a good skill to have, even if you don't use it often, and it is very satisfying to do your own work. I often work by myself, but having an extra set of hands makes the job a lot easier. Tubes complicate the whole thing, but you shouldn't have to worry about that if you are working only with tubeless tires.

k1w1t1m
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Re: tire change

Postby k1w1t1m » Mon Feb 09, 2015 6:43 pm

Harbor Freight is your friend if you decide to do tire changes yourself. The tools and equipment will pay for themselves in short order especially if you do friends tires too. If that is not for you then take the wheels of the bike and take them in. Most shops charge less than $50 to unmount, mount, and balance a wheels and tire.

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HawkeyeGL1200
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1981 GL1100 Interstate

Re: tire change

Postby HawkeyeGL1200 » Mon Feb 09, 2015 7:15 pm

I do my own tire changes with a couple of tire spoons, a 5-gallon bucket and a little sweat. It's much easier to change them when it is WARM outside than when the tires are cold, but if you've got a heated garage, the work isn't bad.

I've watched some You Tube videos on changing motorcycle tires and picked up some good information... If I recall correctly, you can "lay" an 1800 on the right side crash bar and make quick work of getting the rear tire off.. unlike earlier models which require the axle to be pulled through the wheel.

WingAdmin may have a tire tutorial somewhere here as well...
I am wrong as often as I am right concerning what is wrong with someone else' motorcycle without having seen the machine in person. Guessing with limited information, as to the source of the trouble, is sketchy at best.

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roadwanderer2
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Re: tire change

Postby roadwanderer2 » Mon Feb 09, 2015 7:55 pm

I went to harbor freight last September and bought a "motorcycle tire bead breaker", the part # on it was 98875, it was on sale and cost me only $15 dollars and some change with tax. I have yet to use it and its still in the box........yes, the prices that the dealer wants to r & r the rear wheel on these Goldwings are ridiculous. $187.00 labor to remove the rear wheel and $25.00 to dismount and mount and balance your new tire and put the wheel back on.

if you have an older full dressed wing with a rear bumper/light/trailer hitch, saddlebags like I have and only hand tools to work with, it will take you anywhere up to 2 hours to take everything apart to get the rear wheel off,(ask me how I know this), so you can change the rear tire. I had to do it twice on my '83 aspy since I've owned it, once when I first got it and the 2nd time when I was down in Florida,(in 95* heat outside in the open), and if I decide to take another ride down to Florida in June again this year, I'll have to do it again before I go. this time it will be much easer as I now have an air compressor and air tools, 1/2" drive air gun and a 3/8" and 1/4" air ratchets and all the impact metric sockets I need to do almost any job on my bike.

stuart.

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HawkeyeGL1200
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1981 GL1100 Interstate

Re: tire change

Postby HawkeyeGL1200 » Mon Feb 09, 2015 8:13 pm

My first Goldwing tire change took me over an hour and a half.. last time, 45 minutes from start to finish, but it was a warm day. I need to change both rear tires on my bikes, but it's been pretty cold and I no longer have a heated garage. My ex-wife made me sell the house with the 2200 sq. ft. shop I built ... I guess I should have been a better husband.
I am wrong as often as I am right concerning what is wrong with someone else' motorcycle without having seen the machine in person. Guessing with limited information, as to the source of the trouble, is sketchy at best.

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roadwanderer2
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Re: tire change

Postby roadwanderer2 » Mon Feb 09, 2015 9:34 pm

damn, that's a shame you had to sell your house with that nice LARGE shop. wish mine was that big. all I have right now is a 20W x14L garage and its not heated or insulated. its been cold here as well and I have to use my BBQ grill as my heater lol. not knowing what happened between you and your wife, I cant say anything as its none of my business, but I do know and I thank GOD I have a very loving and understanding wife. going on 6 years now this coming July and so far we haven't had one single fight, verbal or otherwise. if something isn't right, we sit down and talk it out. communication is the key to a successful marriage at least that's what she "tells" me lol.

if I don't ride down to Florida again this year, im thinking about expanding my garage. maybe push one side out another 6 feet and the front by about 10 feet. that will give me a total of 26'W x 24' L. that should be large enough to work in :). right now my garage is so full, I have just enough room to walk around my bike with about 2 feet to spare on either side.

stuart.

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tom84std
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Re: tire change

Postby tom84std » Mon Feb 09, 2015 10:11 pm

I've been changing my own tires for years. Get a sheet of old carpet, or cardboard or even plywood to protect the assembly on the concrete. Soapy water and a brush or cloth. Get a couple of tire spoons from a motorcycle shop. Replace the valve stem and take a good look at the wheel bearings. If it's a rear wheel, brake or carburetor cleaner and a brush and rags to clean the spline on the flange. New grease there. You can buy a bead breaker but I've always just used a large C-clamp. If you don't already have one, it's probably about the same money as the bead breaker. I already have C-clamps. Once you get the hang of it, it's really easier than you think. The technique of breaking and then refitting the tire is just something you get with a little practice. I'm sure youtube will have lots of videos. To put the tire back on, with practice you almost don't really need the spoons with the right technique and plenty of soapy water.

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redial
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Re: tire change

Postby redial » Tue Feb 10, 2015 2:54 am

From memory, Little Beaver made himself a tyre changer. It seems to be about a couple of years ago that it came up.

Have a look at this - I think that even I could do this!

http://goldwingdocs.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=10&t=14738&start=50
Len in Kapunda

The world is not going to finish today, as it is already tomorrow in Australia and New Zealand, and other islands of foreign nations such as Guam and Samoa.

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roadwanderer2
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Re: tire change

Postby roadwanderer2 » Tue Feb 10, 2015 6:57 am

hey tom84, you have a concrete floor in your garage? wish I did lol.

stuart.

Dogsled
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Re: tire change

Postby Dogsled » Tue Feb 10, 2015 11:53 am

Bworth, I know what you're talking about. I got a great deal at dennis kirk on tires and bike shops both dealer and aftermarket didn't want to mount them or rape you on the price cause you didn't buy from them. I found a kid in a nearby town that does tires cheap. I'm gonna use him this spring. I know HF got a tire changer but I have enough tools to try to store.
"Fight until hell freezes over, then fight on the ice"

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HawkeyeGL1200
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1981 GL1100 Interstate

Re: tire change

Postby HawkeyeGL1200 » Tue Feb 10, 2015 12:36 pm

One thing I didn't remember in my earlier reply is, if your wheel(s) are anything like mine were the first time I took a tire off, you may want to have a wire brush or some scotch-brite pads handy to clean up the aluminum on the inside of the bead and around the wheel. Mine looked like trash until I cleaned them up...

I also used balancing beads for the first time when I put tires on my Goldwing(s) last fall. I can't tell you if they made a difference or not... but the GL1100 had over an ounce of wheel weights on both wheels and I took them off before I mounted the new tires. The beads seem to work. I asked a local truck-tire shop about them before I tried them in my motorcycle wheels, and he swears by them... 19 ounces in a truck tire !!! 2 ounces in a Motorcycle tire. He tells me I can buy them from him, but we didn't discuss price. I got mine off Ebay for a couple of dollars, pre-packaged in two-ounce baggies...

I didn't use any lubricant (soapy water etc.) because I was worried the water may get into the wheel and make the beads "clump" together...
I am wrong as often as I am right concerning what is wrong with someone else' motorcycle without having seen the machine in person. Guessing with limited information, as to the source of the trouble, is sketchy at best.

Dogsled
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Re: tire change

Postby Dogsled » Tue Feb 10, 2015 12:52 pm

I had a jeep a few years back and they were my first experience with aluminum wheels. When I got it I was always adding air, I took it to a guy I knew and he said Aluminum rims require extra care, cleaning and whatever they put around the rim to mount it also seals it. Now if Aluminum car wheels require this, do Wing aluminum rims mounting require the same thing? There was a heavy emphasis on the cleaning.
"Fight until hell freezes over, then fight on the ice"

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WingAdmin
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Re: tire change

Postby WingAdmin » Tue Feb 10, 2015 12:53 pm

HawkeyeGL1200 wrote:I do my own tire changes with a couple of tire spoons, a 5-gallon bucket and a little sweat. It's much easier to change them when it is WARM outside than when the tires are cold, but if you've got a heated garage, the work isn't bad.

I've watched some You Tube videos on changing motorcycle tires and picked up some good information... If I recall correctly, you can "lay" an 1800 on the right side crash bar and make quick work of getting the rear tire off.. unlike earlier models which require the axle to be pulled through the wheel.

WingAdmin may have a tire tutorial somewhere here as well...


Yup, right here: How to remove and remount your tires

That said, I haven't done this in years - I have a friend with a $10,000 pneumatic motorcycle tire changing machine that makes quick work of the job. :)

I also use a wire brush in a drill to clean the crap off the beads on the rims after the old tire is removed. Don't press hard enough to score the aluminum, just enough to clean the stuff off the rim.

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SteveB123
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Re: tire change

Postby SteveB123 » Tue Feb 10, 2015 1:05 pm

[youtube]

[/YouTube]

Brilliant.
Current:82 GL1100 Interstate, 60 Amp Poorboy, MSD coil
Previous: 93 GSX1100F Katana
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WingAdmin
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Re: tire change

Postby WingAdmin » Tue Feb 10, 2015 1:11 pm

Wow, zip ties have rather sharp edges, and the tire bead is rather thin rubber. I don't know that I would do that, for fear of damaging the bead and causing it to leak air.

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MikeB
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Re: tire change

Postby MikeB » Wed Feb 11, 2015 1:41 am

Even if the zip ties didn't have sharp edges that would damage the rubber, I really don't think you will be able to make a tire suitable for the Goldwing to squeeze together like that. Sport bike tires are really pliable compared to what we use on the Wing. With the amount of lube that guy sprayed on the wheel and tire, I wonder if the tire will break loose from the wheel under high torque and good traction.
MikeB
Tacoma, WA, USA

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PastoT
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Re: tire change

Postby PastoT » Thu Feb 12, 2015 5:03 pm

I have to admit I haven't changed a tire but have a dealership that will for $20 a piece if you bring the rims in. Most certainly the dealership charges the majority of the cost for actually removing the wheels and tying up floor space and lift time; its outrageous - thus I ride to the cheapest provider. Much discussion evolved around the zip tie trick on another board; it seems clear that pulling that off with an 1800's stiff radial tire is not likely to happen. I have used a 4x8 heavy C-Clamp to break the bead loos when I had a valve stem fail, you really need to use something to prevent damage to the rim and side wall, since them I've welded some flat 1 1/2" steel strip on the clamps faces to distribute the force and prevent side wall damage I foresaw. As for the balancing beads, I use them and have noted less cupping or feathering on my E-3 radials (but I also run them at 41/44 PSI and get 19-20k miles out of a pair).

I use a method of pulling the tires off the bike that is actually rather easy if you plan ahead and bring the correct tools, blue Locktite, and a few 2x4 scraps about 18 inches long (I think I used 5 pieces) and a cargo strap. First I drop rear preset to 0, and break the rear lug nuts loose a little while the tire is on the ground still. Then put the bike on its center stand and strap the center stand forward to a crash bar. Next I lift and support the front of the bike and support it with the 2x4 scraps stacked under the belly pan or engine. This is easy if you have someone sit in the pillion seat! Remove the front fender and left brake caliper, loosen the axle bolt on the right and release the pinch bolts. Now you can pull the axle and wiggle the front tire and brake rotors out of the calipers. once the front tire is out ease the forks down to ground level and rest them on a scrap 2x4 (just to keep them from being marred up or scratched. Now the rear tire is well up and one can remove its lug nuts and ease the rear tire out the left side saddlebag and muffler (its a bit heavy to replace but not unmanageable).

I walked the tires into the shop having checked first that they had time to change them, and every tech there ran out to see how the heck I'd got both tires off in the parking lot... that was worth it alone! :shock: If you're using balancing beads bring them with you (2oz for each tire) and ask them to empty the bags in before they reset the tire beads and ask they use as little lube as possible (to avoid potential clumping).

When you get the tires back reinstall them rear first then front. Be sure to use Locktite on the front caliper break bolts. I carry a 12 inch torque wrench and a list of my torque values for reference (actually the service manual is on my tablet), This inch-pound torque wrench just slightly exceeds the rear lug nut torque values; simple math allows you to use it for foot pounds and it fits in my tool pouch. I set the 2x4s in my trunk unless I'm on the road with my trailer where I could use them to support the wing in a soft ground campsite. One could argue that laying the bike down on the right side crash bars is easier, and it would be if you only pull the rear tire. The problem is you can't pull the front axle out if you're doing both tires at the same time, and of course you have to lift the bike back up when you're done. :(
Tom, in Mountain Home, Idaho
2002 GL1800 (Illusion Red) Non-ABS, 108k miles
Retired Air Force

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roadwanderer2
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Re: tire change

Postby roadwanderer2 » Thu Feb 12, 2015 5:30 pm

hey Pasto T:

that's a good way to do it if your changing both tires at the same time. I like the idea of the 2 x 4's under the front forks to keep them from getting scratched up when they are on the ground. I tried putting the balancing beads in my front tire, but they wouldn't go in and I wasted the entire pack trying. when its time to replace the front tire, I'll put them in before I seal it up. same goes for the rear tire. I run my tires a little lower air pressure than you do. I keep mine at 36lbs each.

stuart.

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MikeB
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Re: tire change

Postby MikeB » Thu Feb 12, 2015 5:47 pm

Say Stuart, the next time you have the tires changed, have them replace the valve stems to the metal variety that use a securing nut. For a GL1500 or a GL1800 use this type :

Or this type:


Either work just as well. For your GL1100, straight stems are made to fit also. Your Honda dealer probably has them in stock. That is what I had for my ST1100.

The reason I say that is the bore of the after market stem is more open that the OEM stems. The beads fly right through the after market bolt-ons.
The small bore of the OEM rubber stems makes it difficult to get the beads into the tire.

With the aftermarket stems installed, you should never have to worry about losing the beads during an install.
MikeB
Tacoma, WA, USA

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roadwanderer2
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Re: tire change

Postby roadwanderer2 » Thu Feb 12, 2015 5:59 pm

hey MikeB:

ya know, I was thinking about getting these bent valve stems for my bike. not only would they make putting the beads in easer, but checking the tire pressure and putting air in the tires when needed would also be easer. I also like the way they are secured with the hold down nut once they are installed.

stuart.

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Re: tire change

Postby WingAdmin » Thu Feb 12, 2015 10:21 pm

I've put them on several bikes - it's nice knowing you don't have to worry about rubber valve stems cracking and failing on you.

http://cyclemax.com/inc/sdetail/chrome_ ... ems/124629

http://cyclemax.com/inc/sdetail/90_degr ... ems/206622

As for getting the beads in the tire:




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PastoT
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Re: tire change

Postby PastoT » Tue Feb 17, 2015 10:48 pm

Stuart, I To Was Unable To Inject Beads Through The Valve Stems And Have The OEM Rubber Ones Currently. I Had TI Break The Bead And BLow Them In, But It Wasn't Fun. I Will Be Replacing The Valve Stems With The 90 Degree Metal Valves Next Time I Change Tires. I've Found If I Run My E-3 Tire Pressure Low I Get Terrible Cupping On My Front And FeatherImg On The Rear, But True The Ride Is Gentler. ( I Have No Idea Why My Phone Browser Is Capitalizing Every Word! )
Tom, in Mountain Home, Idaho
2002 GL1800 (Illusion Red) Non-ABS, 108k miles
Retired Air Force

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roadwanderer2
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Re: tire change

Postby roadwanderer2 » Wed Feb 18, 2015 8:14 am

hey pastor:

I had the same thing happen when I tried to put those beads in my front tire with the stock rubber valve stems. next tire change, im definitely going to replace the stems with the 90* ones. when I had my tires at max air pressure, I found that I got a harder ride from the bike, so im running them at 36lbs each, and so far I haven't had any cupping or feathering from them and the ride is a little more "cushiony". I've put almost 4,000 miles on the set I have now and so far so good. I have a continental on the front and a firestone on the back. I still have a brand new Avon front tire still in the wrapper I have yet to put on. both tires I got for free so I cant complain about them. don't worry about the cap letters, its ok :D.

stuart.




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