Non Goldwing - Metal thermostat housing


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redial
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Non Goldwing - Metal thermostat housing

Postby redial » Wed Mar 11, 2015 4:45 am



I am getting desperate. I have a Nissan E20 Urvan that is a Camper-van, 1979 model. I do not think that this model made it to the USA, but is/was used extensively in South Africa and the Middle East as people movers/taxis. Last week I started out on a 500 mile journey, and got just 20 miles, when it stopped, never to go again. I had a ride in a tow truck to bring it home.

The bit that caused the problem is the Thermostat Housing/water outlet for the engine. I have tried wreckers/dismantlers, Nissan parts, United Arab Emirates, South Africa, and a number of other places in Australia. There are none available. They are trying Japan at Nissan, so we will see how that works out.

In the meantime, there is a hole in this housing that is about 1 centimetre long (about less than 0.5 inches). Is there a 'paste' that I can use to paste over the hole, until a new(er) one is sourced? The metal appears to be a cast aluminium, grey in colour.

All positive suggestions welcome.


Len in Kapunda

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themainviking
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Re: Non Goldwing - Metal thermostat housing

Postby themainviking » Wed Mar 11, 2015 7:16 am

Do you have JB Weld in Australia, redial? We use it sometimes over here. It says it can be sanded, drilled, threaded etc. so it should do the trick. Water pressure should not be more than 12-16 pounds, so it should hold. I would try some JB Weld on a cleaned up part, and if necessary, band it with a hose clamp or the like (if it would fit)
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Re: Non Goldwing - Metal thermostat housing

Postby tom84std » Wed Mar 11, 2015 7:42 am

As I was reading his post my first thought was "JB Weld".
It's a little time consuming because it remains runny for so long and has to be watched because of that. I've put it on a piece I could hold in my hands and turned it to keep it from running off the area I wanted it to stay. It's that way for about half an hour. You can warm it some with a heat gun or hair dryer to shorten the set-up time but that just makes it more runny. I've made some impossible repairs with it.

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Re: Non Goldwing - Metal thermostat housing

Postby robb » Wed Mar 11, 2015 8:14 am

I rate Quiksteel at top of the list. Used it on blocks, heads and broken thermostat housings. Simply cut a piece and roll with hand to mix to consistent color and make repair. As a solid it is easily formed to an non flat surface.
http://www.autozone.com/sealants-glues- ... 44797_0_0/

This is great for repair bet much harder to fit if surface is round.
http://www.jbweld.com/product/j-b-weld/

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Re: Non Goldwing - Metal thermostat housing

Postby roadwanderer2 » Wed Mar 11, 2015 9:41 am

your best bet is to use this product from JB weld. its called "J-B Waterweld is an epoxy putty that's designed to plug holes and make permanent repairs in moist-surface or underwater applications. Fully cures in as little as 20 to 30 minutes and is nontoxic. Adheres to most surfaces.


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Re: Non Goldwing - Metal thermostat housing

Postby Old Wing Man » Wed Mar 11, 2015 10:11 am

I second JBWeld. I have used it to repair broken aluminum housing on my nail guns. It is a bit brittle when set but should not be a problem with your T-stat housing. I also fixed 4 cracks in my tractors diesel fuel tank with it about 4 years ago and they are still holding. Just be sure to clean it good so all the anti-freeze residue and any oils or grease is removed. Also roughen up the area so it has something to hold on to . If you remove the housing (recommended) then you can also put a coating on the inside of the housing.

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Re: Non Goldwing - Metal thermostat housing

Postby roadwanderer2 » Wed Mar 11, 2015 10:26 am

Old Wing Man wrote:I second JBWeld. I have used it to repair broken aluminum housing on my nail guns. It is a bit brittle when set but should not be a problem with your T-stat housing. I also fixed 4 cracks in my tractors diesel fuel tank with it about 4 years ago and they are still holding. Just be sure to clean it good so all the anti-freeze residue and any oils or grease is removed. Also roughen up the area so it has something to hold on to . If you remove the housing (recommended) then you can also put a coating on the inside of the housing.


that's a good idea about coating the inside also. it should make for a stronger hold.

stuart.

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Re: Non Goldwing - Metal thermostat housing

Postby Rob H » Wed Mar 11, 2015 10:37 am

Hi Redail

I grew up in SA and can tell you there are still loads on the road there, moving people and causing chaos, so I am surprised that you did not find what you are looking for.
Currently I live in Oman and there are a few about. What engine do you have in yours and could you load a photo of what you need?
Without seeing it as a fix I would plug it with a 10 mm water plug that we use for water galleries in engines. But as I said it's difficult without seeing it.

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Rob

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Re: Non Goldwing - Metal thermostat housing

Postby deanbw » Wed Mar 11, 2015 2:13 pm

Post a picture of it. I know it would cost some to ship but I restore almost anything with wheels, well and things that float. from model "T" to forklifts, tractors, old boats, PWC doesn't matter. If I see it I may be able to resurrect it. I have had to make /repair some pretty far gone parts. I'm not looking for payment, just helping a member

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Re: Non Goldwing - Metal thermostat housing

Postby WingAdmin » Wed Mar 11, 2015 3:11 pm

tom84std wrote:As I was reading his post my first thought was "JB Weld".
It's a little time consuming because it remains runny for so long and has to be watched because of that. I've put it on a piece I could hold in my hands and turned it to keep it from running off the area I wanted it to stay. It's that way for about half an hour. You can warm it some with a heat gun or hair dryer to shorten the set-up time but that just makes it more runny. I've made some impossible repairs with it.


Yup, J-B Weld. They have a newer version out that sets up much faster - around 5-6 minutes or so. You do have to work quickly however, to prevent it from setting up before you're ready. It starts out runny like regular J-B Weld, and stays that way for around 5 minutes, then within a matter of 30 seconds or so it goes stiff. It then cures just as hard as regular J-B Weld.




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