NAPA Auto Moly Paste


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robb
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NAPA Auto Moly Paste

Postby robb » Mon Oct 05, 2015 8:09 pm



Does the Moly Paste sold at NAPA Auto Parts acceptable for our wings. Changing rear wheel and I'm out of Moly 60.

http://www.napaonline.com/Catalog/Catal ... 0018441207

MSDS Sheet
http://s7d9.scene7.com/is/content/Genui ... 3pdf?$PDF$



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mrtwowheel
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Re: NAPA Auto Moly Paste

Postby mrtwowheel » Mon Oct 05, 2015 8:36 pm

This is the conclusion that I have come to regarding what is actually in those tubes of Honda Moly 60 Paste. First there was Honda 45 Moly Paste, that grease (paste) was upgraded to Honda Moly 60 Paste. At the same time that Honda changed theirs, the automotive industry changed their CV joint grease from 45 pound Timken OK Load rated grease to 60 pound Timken OK Load rated grease. See the similarity? 45 and 60 has nothing to do with the percentages of moly in these greases. 45 and 60 comes from the Timken OK Load tests done on these greases. Searching for the percentages of moly contained in these greases has caused some bad info to be plastered all over the internet. CV joint grease is what this stuff IS. The same requirements are needed for both applications, a grease that will stay there under pressure. This stuff will dry out, change color, look like dirt, and still be there doing its job. Check out most of the greases containing moly, most of them are not recommended for CV joints. Any grease "currently" recommended for CV joints is a good replacement for Honda Moly 60 and may very well be the very same grease that is in those Honda tubes. For instance, AutoZone sells a packet of CV joint grease for $1.99.

Scott
Last edited by mrtwowheel on Mon Oct 05, 2015 8:38 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Aussie81Interstate
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Re: NAPA Auto Moly Paste

Postby Aussie81Interstate » Mon Oct 05, 2015 8:38 pm

The moly % is between 60-100 so is fine to use.

:)

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mrtwowheel
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Re: NAPA Auto Moly Paste

Postby mrtwowheel » Mon Oct 05, 2015 9:57 pm

THERE"S MORE TO THE FORMULATION OF THIS GREASE THAN THE PERCENTAGE OF MOLY THAT IT CONTAINS. IT"S CV JOINT GREASE.

Scott

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Aussie81Interstate
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Re: NAPA Auto Moly Paste

Postby Aussie81Interstate » Mon Oct 05, 2015 10:06 pm

Ok fine,

I purchased several containers of this brand of loctite paste, and have used it for my CX bikes - and believe me it is more than adequate for the job.

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MikeB
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Re: NAPA Auto Moly Paste

Postby MikeB » Mon Oct 05, 2015 10:13 pm

I'd say it is very acceptable.
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mrtwowheel
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Re: NAPA Auto Moly Paste

Postby mrtwowheel » Mon Oct 05, 2015 10:15 pm

Aussie81Interstate wrote:Ok fine,

I purchased several containers of this brand of loctite paste, and have used it for my CX bikes - and believe me it is more than adequate for the job.


Isn't that stuff formulated for assembly, soon to be easily dissolved and washed away by engine oil?

Scott

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MikeB
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Re: NAPA Auto Moly Paste

Postby MikeB » Mon Oct 05, 2015 10:29 pm

mrtwowheel wrote:
Isn't that stuff formulated for assembly, soon to be easily dissolved and washed away by engine oil?

Scott


I don't know. Is there any written data on that?
MikeB
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Aussie81Interstate
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Re: NAPA Auto Moly Paste

Postby Aussie81Interstate » Tue Oct 06, 2015 12:36 am

The rear splines do not normally come into contact with engine oil - this is a high pressure grease - if you ever get any on your hands - try and wash it off with detergent - it sticks like glue. I had a CX that did high mileage after the application of this moly paste, and it still had more than 95% of it left when I changed a rear tyre 18,000 km later. I reapplied more moly to the existing when I changed the rear tyre - the splines had not worn at all that I could see. Great product and more than comparable to Honda moly 60.

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Re: NAPA Auto Moly Paste

Postby WingAdmin » Tue Oct 06, 2015 8:34 am

The Moly paste (generally grease with a molybdenum content of 50% or greater) is not used like regular grease. It is normally used in applications such as splined gear interfaces, which do not appear to move relative to one another - but actually do so a very tiny amount (dependent on the tolerances of the splined parts).

Because the tolerances of the spline interfaces means they do move very slightly when loaded and unloaded, leaving the two splined pieces unlubricated will eventually wear the splines down.

However, because there is tremendous pressure between the splines themselves, regular grease cannot be used - it would be squished out, leaving no lubrication behind.

There are two common ways that you can lubricate splines in these circumstances:

- Immerse the splines in gear oil
- Use molybdenum

Because it's impractical to have wheel splines immersed in oil, we use moly. Molybdenum is a metal, so it must be applied with a carrier - this carrier is the grease part of the "paste."

Once the moly paste is applied to the splines and the splines are reassembled, when the splines are put into use, tremendous pressure between the splines squeezes out the carrier grease. However, the moly remains behind, and this is what lubricates the splines. This is also why using regular non-moly (or low-moly) grease does not work: the lubrication is quickly lost, leaving unlubricated splines to quickly wear.

This is not the same as CV grease - most CV grease contains about 5% molybdenum. CV grease is intended to remain in contact with the CV surfaces - the CV boot is used to keep the grease from being flung out. If the CV boot splits, the grease is lost, and the CV joint fails from lack of lubrication.

The high-moly grease required for the spline lubrication on shaft-drive motorcycles is quite a bit more expensive than the regular automotive grease you find at the auto parts store. If it doesn't have at minimum 50% molybdenum, do not use it to lubricate your splines.

The M-77 assembly paste that Honda now sells is 55% - 75% molybdenum, according to its MSDS.

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robb
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Re: NAPA Auto Moly Paste

Postby robb » Tue Oct 06, 2015 9:06 am

Thanks all. I ordered the 8oz can from NAPA. Better safe than broke down 20k later. Got 20k on last motorcycle tire and plan double that with car tire.

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mrtwowheel
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Re: NAPA Auto Moly Paste

Postby mrtwowheel » Tue Oct 06, 2015 11:30 am

When CV joint boots fail the grease does not leave, the joint failure that follows is caused by water and dirt that enters the joint. Same would happen to our final drive flanges and splines if the Orings failed and allowed dirt and water in. There's more to the formulation of this grease than the percentage of moly that it contains.

Scott




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