waterless antifreeze


Technical information and Q&A applicable to all years and models of Goldwings
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targhee dick
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waterless antifreeze

Post by targhee dick » Wed May 17, 2017 9:49 pm



Has anyone heard of or used Evans Waterless Antifreeze? It is supposed to bring the temperature up to over three hundred versus one twelve. Just curious.



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ekvh
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Re: waterless antifreeze

Post by ekvh » Thu May 18, 2017 8:03 am

I've read the same. Actual cylinder head temps went up quite a bit. I googled it and the info is from a competitor, but it seems like it's legit. Lots of automotive folks post the same. It has potential for jelling down the road too.

targhee dick
Posts: 33
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Re: waterless antifreeze

Post by targhee dick » Thu May 18, 2017 10:52 am

Thanks EKVH, I was wondering if anyone else used it. I ran into guy who uses it, and he said it works fine. Did not mention about the jelling though. I have too much money invested in my bike, to experiment with something I am not sure of. Thanks for the information.

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MikeB
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Re: waterless antifreeze

Post by MikeB » Thu May 18, 2017 12:07 pm

targhee **** wrote:...I have too much money invested in my bike, to experiment with something I am not sure of. Thanks for the information.
You and me both.
MikeB
Tacoma, WA, USA

harvey01
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Re: waterless antifreeze

Post by harvey01 » Thu May 18, 2017 4:16 pm

MikeB wrote:
targhee **** wrote:...I have too much money invested in my bike, to experiment with something I am not sure of. Thanks for the information.
You and me both.
Me too! Flush Honda Coolant out every few years and replace!
harvey
Ride Safe and Ride Often

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raven41951
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Re: waterless antifreeze

Post by raven41951 » Wed May 31, 2017 1:26 pm

I am not fluent with Evans coolant, but I did google it to investigate it. It appears they have replaced the water content of typical antifreeze with propylene glycol, which makes it "antifreeze" by lowering the freezing temperature of the solution (water/propylene-glycol). It also raises the boiling point.

It stands to reason that replacing more (or 97%) of the water with propylene glycol would make it more efficient. Antifreeze also contains rust inhibitors that need to be there because of the water content. So again, it stands to reason the eliminating the water will eliminate or at lease greatly reduce the amount of corrosion in the cooling system.

There is also reduced system pressure. Why? Because the Evans coolant has a high boiling point and lower freezing point it does not expand and contract like water does. Nor does it vaporize like water does, which is what creates the pressure build up in the existing systems.

So why use it? Ask someone you know who races or has some high performance equipment!

This is not meant to be a scientific analysis by any means, just to get the ball rolling on some actual empirical data collection in the forum to see how this stuff really performs in our wings. I for one am willing to try it.

Old Wing Man
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Re: waterless antifreeze

Post by Old Wing Man » Thu Jun 01, 2017 6:58 am

"It stands to reason that replacing more (or 97%) of the water with propylene glycol would make it more efficient."

Ethylene glycol for sure (haven't looked up the propylene glycol specs)needs water to make it more freeze resistant. IIRC, pure antifreeze will freeze at a much higher temp. than antifreeze/water mixture. As for boiling point, pure might be better but then you wont have the lower freeze protection of a water mixture.

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raven41951
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Re: waterless antifreeze

Post by raven41951 » Thu Jun 01, 2017 7:49 pm

Here is some specs from DOW:
Vapor Pressure And Boiling Point
All liquids form vapors which exert pressure characteristic of the materials. The pressure exerted by these vapors in the presence of the liquid is called the vapor pressure. The vapor pressure increases with temperature, as shown by Figures 6 and 7. The boiling point of a liquid is the temperature at which its vapor pressure is equal to the external pressure on the surface of the liquid. When the liquid is heated in an open vessel, it will boil when its vapor pressure is equal to the atmospheric pressure. The normal boiling point is defined as the temperature at which a liquid boils at 760 mm Hg. (In Figures 6 and 7, bold lines have been drawn across the curves at 760 mm.) The normal boiling points of each of the glycols are the points at which the glycol vapor-pressure curves cross these lines.

Glycols have lower vapor pressures than water and their boiling points are above the boiling point of water. If the external pressure is reduced, glycols will boil at lower temperatures, as shown in the following Figures, where the vapor pressures of glycols are equal to the reduced external pressure.

The following table lists the boiling points of water and glycols when the external pressure is reduced to 50 mm Hg.
Glycols are considered high boiling point liquids because of their low vapor pressure compared to that of water at any given temperature. It is interesting to note that at 68°F (20°C) the vapor pressure of water is more than 100 times as great as that of propylene glycol, the most volatile of the glycols listed. This low volatility of glycols lessens their tendency to evaporate and has led to their use as plasticizers, “permanent” antifreeze agents, solvent vehicles, hygroscopic agents, and ingredients of brake fluids.

Boiling Points at 50mm Hg
Water 100.6°F 38.1°C
Propylene Glycol 240.6°F 115.9°C
Dipropylene Glycol 306.5°F 152.5°C
Tripropylene Glycol 358.9°F 181.6°C

http://msdssearch.dow.com/PublishedLite ... age=GetDoc

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minimac
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Re: waterless antifreeze

Post by minimac » Thu Jun 08, 2017 7:05 am

Has anyone actually tried this yet? I understand it raise the boiling point,thus reducing vapors and gases, but the question I have is does it actually help the bike run cooler? While a higher boiling point may be advantageous, there are other factors affected by temperature to consider, such as gaskets, hoses, oil temperature, engine/ring wear etc. I'm familiar with Redline Waterwetter and have used it very successfully in the past. I never studied its composition, but it did help to run a bit cooler.



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