semi-synthetic oil


Technical information and Q&A applicable to all years and models of Goldwings
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TwoTone Trike
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semi-synthetic oil

Post by TwoTone Trike » Mon Nov 13, 2017 10:37 am



Would it be alright to use a semi-synthetic as long as it doesn't have friction modifiers in it?



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minimac
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Re: semi-synthetic oil

Post by minimac » Mon Nov 13, 2017 11:04 am

What makes it "semi-synthetic"? It either is or it isn't. A synthetic mixed with dino, is no longer synthetic.

TwoTone Trike
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Re: semi-synthetic oil

Post by TwoTone Trike » Mon Nov 13, 2017 11:56 am

You tell me as I don;t know. I'm just stating what the manufacturer (Lucas) states on the bottle. It also says it is designed for wet clutches. I've had good luck with Lucas in my ole 53 Panhead and would to try it in my 99 Wing. Thanks, Tony

harvey01
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Re: semi-synthetic oil

Post by harvey01 » Mon Nov 13, 2017 12:51 pm

I would be concerned that the weight of the oil meets cycle manufacturer and that the oil meet other certifications it requires such as JAS.

Honda makes or has ade to their specs a semi-synthetic that has worked well in my GL1800 for over 120,000 miles.
harvey
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TwoTone Trike
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Re: semi-synthetic oil

Post by TwoTone Trike » Mon Nov 13, 2017 1:52 pm

It meets jaso ma2. Designed for wet clutches.

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AZgl1800
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Re: semi-synthetic oil

Post by AZgl1800 » Mon Nov 13, 2017 2:27 pm

TwoTone Trike wrote:
Mon Nov 13, 2017 1:52 pm
It meets jaso ma2. Designed for wet clutches.
then you are good to go....

the single most important thing to remember, is to pull the drain plug on regular schedules, not what brand of oil is in the crankcase.
John
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daughter named her Big Bird :lol:
http://www.goldwingfacts.com

TwoTone Trike
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Re: semi-synthetic oil

Post by TwoTone Trike » Mon Nov 13, 2017 6:41 pm

Yes that's what I thought. It's 10w40. Thanks, Tony

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Re: semi-synthetic oil

Post by TwoTone Trike » Mon Nov 13, 2017 7:17 pm

Mini said, What makes it "semi-synthetic"?. It either is or it isn't. A synthetic mixed with dino is no longer synthetic. I came here looking for help and you answered my question with a question. If you had no idea then why did you even chime in? Quite snidely, as a matter of fact. I don't know why I'm surprised. You're from New Yawk.

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themainviking
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Re: semi-synthetic oil

Post by themainviking » Tue Nov 14, 2017 7:48 am

All three are fine for your motorcycle as long as they meet the requirements to begin with. A 10W40 that is JASO MA/MA2 certified will work just fine. If it is Dino oil, I would change it out at 3K, a Semi Synth at 5K, and a full Synth at 7K to 10K depending on the severity of your riding conditions. All three, if used as mentioned, will protect your bike and lubricate appropriately. From what I understand, a semi synthetic is formulated using Dino Base Stock and has synthetic properties added to it during the mixing process. A Dino oil is indeed out of the ground and being fully natural, has different sized molecules throughout its content. This is like different sized balls in a bearing. They actually work against the sheer properties of the oil. A full synthetic is formulated from Esther or Di-esther base stocks which have been synthezised to have identically sized molecules, which do not work against themselves. The sheer properties last much longer.

All of these should be changed at 3 to 5 thousand miles if your motorcycle is operated under severe conditions, such as off road with dust, or stop and go, or a lot of starts and stops. All of these things contribute to the contamination of your engine oil. If none of these is present in your day to day operation, then this does not apply.

I personally use Amsoil 10W30 Metric motorcycle oil for 10K or one year, whichever comes first. I usually end up changing halfway, as the 10K has been reached. When I change in summer months, I go to 10W40 in the same oil, and when I store the bike in the fall, back to 10W30 so I am ready for the cooler temps in the spring. I seldom get more than 20K a year. If you happen to notice that I am in Canada, ignore it for the mileage numbers, as all in this post are meant to be read as miles.

One thing I should mention here is that semi synthetic oil manufacturers have no regulation as to how little or how much synthetic properties there oil have. There could be as little as an eyedropper in a gallon, or even less. If you were to pay significantly more for a semi synthetic than for a dino oil, you may not be getting your moneys worth at all.
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TwoTone Trike
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Re: semi-synthetic oil

Post by TwoTone Trike » Tue Nov 14, 2017 12:53 pm

Thank you Viking for your explanation of a semi-synthetic. I had know idea as to it's chemical make-up. I'll keep all of this in mind. I appreciate you sharing your knowledge. It's people like you that help to educate people like me . Lord knows I can use all the education that I can get. Have a good day. Tony

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Re: semi-synthetic oil

Post by minimac » Tue Nov 14, 2017 3:40 pm

There was nothing snide in my comment. A "semi-synthetic" is still a dino based oil. Adding some of the synthetic properties (friction modifiers) doesn't make it a synthetic, is just a modified dino. As I said, it either is synthetic or it's not. Calling it something else doesn't make it so. Being a wise ass is not a good way to get people to help educate you.

TwoTone Trike
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Re: semi-synthetic oil

Post by TwoTone Trike » Tue Nov 14, 2017 3:56 pm

Sorry mini for taking it that way. Please accept my humble apology. Tony

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cihilb
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Re: semi-synthetic oil

Post by cihilb » Mon Nov 20, 2017 5:40 pm

If you get right down to it, all engine oil is semi-synthetic. They contain additives that enhance the properties of the oil. Whether is friction modifiers or anti-foaming agents, temp stabilizers or anything else that makes the oil lubricate better.



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