SafeTkick Motorcycle Kickstand Pad Support


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SafeTkick Motorcycle Kickstand Pad Support

Postby WingAdmin » Tue Dec 09, 2014 11:32 am



A big problem with riding big, heavy bikes is parking on soft surfaces. You flip down the sidestand, lean the bike over, and watch the sidestand sink into the ground. How far will it sink? What if it rains? Will your bike "take a nap" while you're gone?

There are multiple products available to try to fix this problem. I used to use the metal cover from an electrical octagon box, to shove under the kickstand of my GL1500 Goldwing when I parked. This worked great...until I forgot I had used it, and rode away without picking it up. It was also a pain to use, both in trying to shove it under the kickstand when parking, and retrieve it from under the kickstand when leaving - usually involving several mounts and dismounts.

Next I tried a "foot" on the end of the kickstand - this is a bolt-on piece that simply makes the area of the kickstand foot larger, so it won't sink into the ground. I discarded with this idea almost immediately. It was thick enough to raise the kickstand enough that the bike sat uncomfortably upright: a gust of wind could potentially blow my bike over.

Next I tried a plastic disc with a string attached. This got shoved under the kickstand when parking, and the string was tied to the handlebar, to remind you to retrieve it before leaving. When you do leave, instead of leaning over to try to pick it up, you simply pulled the string after retracting the kickstand. However, it was still difficult to try to shove it under the kickstand when parking, trying to position it just right. Plus I would go through one every few months, because my heavy bike would crack the plastic.

Then I tried this new product - the SafeTkick. Basically a piece of foam with a telescopic antenna attached as a handle, it attempts to solve quite a few issues.

Safetkick extended
Safetkick extended


Extending the handle, you can easily position the device under the kickstand while still seated on the bike. It also makes it simple to retrieve when leaving, again while still seated on the bike.

Safetkick collapsed
Safetkick collapsed


The collapsing handle makes it relatively compact and easy to store, either in a pocket or a cubby on the bike.

Safetkick features
Safetkick features


Another "feature" claimed by the manufacturer is the ability of the little foam reflector at the top of the handle to keep careless cage drivers from bashing their car doors into your bike. I find this claim dubious - it is not my experience that a driver careless enough to bash your bike with their car door is going to care about (or be alerted by) a little red foam knob.

So how does it work? Really well, actually. I was concerned about the thickness of the foam pad, thinking I was going to repeat my experience with the "sidestand foot" that made my bike site too upright. But the foam pad actually compresses with the weight of the bike, distributing the weight over the area of the pad and successfully keeping the sidestand from sinking into the ground. However, after several months of use, I noticed a large crack developing in the top of the foam, in the center next to where the sidestand normally went. I suspect this might have happened when I used it in cold weather, when the foam was quite stiff. Every use after then caused the crack to widen, until the whole foam pad failed entirely and I had to discontinue use of it.

Perhaps it is not designed for the weight of an 800 lb motorcycle? Or perhaps it is a problem with applying large force to the foam when it is very cold (and less compliant)? I don't know the answer. I know it worked quite well before the foam failed.



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Re: SafeTkick Motorcycle Kickstand Pad Support

Postby triwing » Mon Feb 02, 2015 2:36 pm

Just saw your posting, & thought I'd share a variation on your electrical cover support I've used for years, after leaving more than one behind. :roll: If you wear lace up boots with 8 sets of holes, & hooks, an old, or new lace, tied through the hole, & a loop on the other end, for the clutch master cylinder, a mirror stem, etc, is great reminder. Refer to mine as the anchor, ;) haven't left one behind in years. :)

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Re: SafeTkick Motorcycle Kickstand Pad Support

Postby ghostvet » Tue Feb 03, 2015 10:39 am

Seems to me the same thing can be achieved with that electric box cover and a radio antenna. Either salvage one from an old one or go to radio shack and get one. Any expandable stick would work. But it is a solution I never thought of, and that well be the next thing I will make I think.

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Re: SafeTkick Motorcycle Kickstand Pad Support

Postby triwing » Tue Feb 03, 2015 12:25 pm

Hard to forget what's in your way

Deckard7
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Re: SafeTkick Motorcycle Kickstand Pad Support

Postby Deckard7 » Sun Mar 01, 2015 12:19 pm

Ace Hardware, and probably numerous others, sell expandable wand magnets for picking up small parts. One of these and the electrical box cover will run around $5.00 and should do the same thing as the foam pad, but last much longer.
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Ka2azman
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Re: SafeTkick Motorcycle Kickstand Pad Support

Postby Ka2azman » Mon Mar 02, 2015 5:34 am

Looks too large to put into one of the boxes in the front. So once you pick it up, what do you do with it?

I made one with a piece of thin flat steel about 3x4". Drilled a hole in one of the corners, then bent that corner upward about 45 degrees to allow the hole to be in the air. Then took a piece of heavy colorful cordage and placed it through the hole (fluorescent yellow). Made a small permanent loop on the other end large enough so as to allow it to be placed on the clutch lever handle. The cord was long enough to have it loop over the handle bar to prevent slippage even with wind and also making it very visible from sitting position.

Sit on the bike, pick the bike up then using the cord pick up the piece of steel. Rap the cord around the steel plate and put in the unlocked front box.

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Re: SafeTkick Motorcycle Kickstand Pad Support

Postby ghostvet » Mon Mar 02, 2015 9:07 am

Ka2azman wrote:Looks too large to put into one of the boxes in the front. So once you pick it up, what do you do with it?

I made one with a piece of thin flat steel about 3x4". Drilled a hole in one of the corners, then bent that corner upward about 45 degrees to allow the hole to be in the air. Then took a piece of heavy colorful cordage and placed it through the hole (fluorescent yellow). Made a small permanent loop on the other end large enough so as to allow it to be placed on the clutch lever handle. The cord was long enough to have it loop over the handle bar to prevent slippage even with wind and also making it very visible from sitting position.

Sit on the bike, pick the bike up then using the cord pick up the piece of steel. Rap the cord around the steel plate and put in the unlocked front box.


I have a plastic kickstand pad from GEICO (a promotional item from a bike show) with a cord- exactly the same thing, which I too keep in my left fairing pocket. The problem for me is dropping the pad and maneuvering the heavy bike on soft ground to get the pad under the kickstand is not easy. And leaning over with my bike is not always so successful as I would like. :roll: That's why the expandable rod idea is so cool for me.

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Re: SafeTkick Motorcycle Kickstand Pad Support

Postby WingAdmin » Mon Mar 02, 2015 11:51 am

ghostvet wrote:I have a plastic kickstand pad from GEICO (a promotional item from a bike show) with a cord- exactly the same thing, which I too keep in my left fairing pocket. The problem for me is dropping the pad and maneuvering the heavy bike on soft ground to get the pad under the kickstand is not easy. And leaning over with my bike is not always so successful as I would like. :roll: That's why the expandable rod idea is so cool for me.


I had one of those too, but the first time I tried using it on soft grass, the kickstand went right through it - I guess they didn't design it for the weight of a Goldwing! :)

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Re: SafeTkick Motorcycle Kickstand Pad Support

Postby Solina Dave » Mon Mar 02, 2015 7:41 pm

I've used this system for a few years now. It's a telescopic retrieval magnet that's the same size as a BIC ballpoint pen, retracted, and extends to 26", and lifts up to 24 oz. The electrical box cover weighs 3 oz. I bought it at Canadian Tire for about 10 or 12 dollars, and the plate was a buck. I find that if I attach the plate to the magnet, I can place the plate in a good spot under the side stand. Often when retrieving the plate, if I place the magnet closer than about 1" from the edge, the plate will flip into a vertical position simply due to the exaggerated off centre positioning, but there's still all kinds of pulling force from the magnet to hold the plate securely.
When the plate's in use I can either attach the retracted magnet to the ignition switch, or to the handlebar and then simply lay it over the ignition switch. This is my way of having something say, "Hey stupid, pick up the plate!" It's right in the way of the key, so I can even figure that out.
I have an earlier wing, a '78, so no problem. I'm not too familiar with the newer machines and their computer chips and possible stuff in the ignition switch that may be affected by a magnet. That would be something to consider if attaching the magnet to the ignition switch, or one could just use the handlebar method. One other thing that you can do, if you'd like, is to track down a thicker plate. I find that the regular box cover plates tend to get all bent out of shape after a while, but they're cheap, and I just simply replace it when needed.
I attached some photos that will give you a better idea. It's been working well for me, maybe you'll like this idea.

It must be my magnetic personality..........................Dave
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Re: SafeTkick Motorcycle Kickstand Pad Support

Postby ghostvet » Tue Mar 03, 2015 8:22 am

Solina Dave wrote:I've used this system for a few years now. It's a telescopic retrieval magnet that's the same size as a BIC ballpoint pen, retracted, and extends to 26", and lifts up to 24 oz. The electrical box cover weighs 3 oz. I bought it at Canadian Tire for about 10 or 12 dollars, and the plate was a buck. I find that if I attach the plate to the magnet, I can place the plate in a good spot under the side stand. Often when retrieving the plate, if I place the magnet closer than about 1" from the edge, the plate will flip into a vertical position simply due to the exaggerated off centre positioning, but there's still all kinds of pulling force from the magnet to hold the plate securely.
When the plate's in use I can either attach the retracted magnet to the ignition switch, or to the handlebar and then simply lay it over the ignition switch. This is my way of having something say, "Hey stupid, pick up the plate!" It's right in the way of the key, so I can even figure that out.
I have an earlier wing, a '78, so no problem. I'm not too familiar with the newer machines and their computer chips and possible stuff in the ignition switch that may be affected by a magnet. That would be something to consider if attaching the magnet to the ignition switch, or one could just use the handlebar method. One other thing that you can do, if you'd like, is to track down a thicker plate. I find that the regular box cover plates tend to get all bent out of shape after a while, but they're cheap, and I just simply replace it when needed.
I attached some photos that will give you a better idea. It's been working well for me, maybe you'll like this idea.

It must be my magnetic personality..........................Dave



It does not get much more elegant than that!

Thank you.

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CWJ73
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Re: SafeTkick Motorcycle Kickstand Pad Support

Postby CWJ73 » Mon Mar 09, 2015 4:56 pm

I think I'll be stopping a Canadian Tire on the way home. Thanks for the info on your method.


Solina Dave wrote:I've used this system for a few years now. It's a telescopic retrieval magnet that's the same size as a BIC ballpoint pen, retracted, and extends to 26", and lifts up to 24 oz. The electrical box cover weighs 3 oz. I bought it at Canadian Tire for about 10 or 12 dollars, and the plate was a buck. I find that if I attach the plate to the magnet, I can place the plate in a good spot under the side stand. Often when retrieving the plate, if I place the magnet closer than about 1" from the edge, the plate will flip into a vertical position simply due to the exaggerated off centre positioning, but there's still all kinds of pulling force from the magnet to hold the plate securely.
When the plate's in use I can either attach the retracted magnet to the ignition switch, or to the handlebar and then simply lay it over the ignition switch. This is my way of having something say, "Hey stupid, pick up the plate!" It's right in the way of the key, so I can even figure that out.
I have an earlier wing, a '78, so no problem. I'm not too familiar with the newer machines and their computer chips and possible stuff in the ignition switch that may be affected by a magnet. That would be something to consider if attaching the magnet to the ignition switch, or one could just use the handlebar method. One other thing that you can do, if you'd like, is to track down a thicker plate. I find that the regular box cover plates tend to get all bent out of shape after a while, but they're cheap, and I just simply replace it when needed.
I attached some photos that will give you a better idea. It's been working well for me, maybe you'll like this idea.

It must be my magnetic personality..........................Dave
Craig

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Re: SafeTkick Motorcycle Kickstand Pad Support

Postby Oldbear » Sun Mar 15, 2015 10:46 am

I have a the centre hub-cap from Chrysler 5th Ave. But I will be looking to replace it with some of the ideas mentioned here.


My wife is the greatest - she won't let me sell my bike - I'm less grumpy when I ride...


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