BulletHD Biker Pro Camera Review


Reviews of Goldwing and motorcycle-related products and services
  • Sponsored Links
User avatar
WingAdmin
Site Admin
Posts: 17046
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 4:16 pm
Location: Strongsville, OH
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1982 GL1100A Aspencade (sold)
1989 PC800 (wife's!)
1998 XV250 Virago (sold)
2007 Aspen Sentry Trailer

BulletHD Biker Pro Camera Review

Postby WingAdmin » Sun Sep 27, 2015 8:26 pm



I have been wanting to put a video camera on my bike for many years. I have made many, many attempts at this. The first was eight years ago, when I literally duct-taped a Sony handheld digital camera to the side of my helmet while riding my GL1100. As you can see, the results were less than spectacular:





Three years ago I tried sticking a tiny "keychain" camera, commonly known as an "808 camera" to the top of my GL1500's windshield vent, pointing through the front of my windshield. While it generated a better video than the Sony digital camera, the video was quite soft and fuzzy, the contrast and dynamic range horrific, and the storage and battery life were extremely limited - about 25 minutes on a full charge before it died and had to be recharged. It also had next to zero low-light sensitivity:





I purchased another small camera whose manufacturer and model I can't even recall anymore. It came with an excellent variety of mounting options, was weatherproof and could be powered from the bike - but the video quality was so horrendous that I put it back in the box and threw it in my pile of old junk.

When the Innov C3 came out, I thought that this was going to be my answer. Unlike other cameras, it was a "bullet" camera - where the camera piece was a small bullet-shaped device, which connected to a DVR (digital video recorder) "brain" with a long wire. The video quality was good, and it looked well suited for motorcycle use. However, reading various camera review sites, I couldn't help but notice the continuous complaints of firmware issues: continual lockups, lost files, dead cameras. Firmware releases would fix one problem and create another. I waited almost a year for this platform to become stable - and that's when the BulletHD Biker Pro camera dropped into my lap.

Let me begin by stating that this camera was provided to me at no charge, for evaluation purposes by the good people at Pier 28. That said, anyone who has read my reviews in the past knows that I have no problem slamming a poor quality product regardless of the source or cost.

After years of researching cameras of these types, I had developed a list of features that I wanted for my bike camera:

- Bullet (remote) camera mounted away from the DVR
- A relatively wide angle lens
- Ability to loop files - i.e. record in say five minute segments, and when the storage card is full, begin erasing and overwriting the oldest files
- Ability to record sound
- Ability to be powered by the bike, but also includes a battery (or even better: a capacitor) to power the camera for smooth, clean shutdowns
- Full HD 1080p (or better) resolution,
- Excellent daytime and nighttime performance
- Waterproof - I ride rain or shine!
- Automatic record start when bike is started, and automatic stop when bike is shut off
- Reliable - no crashes or lost files!
- Ability to take large capacity SD or Micro-SD cards

The Biker Pro camera fit every one of these categories, with the exception of the capacitor. Rechargeable batteries used in cameras tend to not do well in extremely hot environments like those found on bikes, and the battery will die after a while. Capacitors have a much shorter life than batteries, but are less affected by heat. The battery in the Biker Pro camera has an 850mAh capacity - good enough to power the camera for a full hour, so I don't think this will be an issue for this unit.

The Biker Pro camera has all of these features - but it has one huge feature that has really sold me: the ability to connect to a smartphone (iPhone or Android) via WiFi. This allows you to do several important things:

- Access the recorded images from the phone
- Configure the camera from the phone
- View the camera image live from the phone

Configuring the camera from the phone is a huge plus - on all other cameras I have used, to configure the settings on the camera, you have to manually create a cryptic text file containing configuration parameters, then load the text file onto the memory card. Every camera seemed to have different configuration options, and documentation is sparse at best. This feature puts this camera way ahead in the usability aspect.

So let's have a look at the camera.

Image

The camera system as it comes in its box shows the camera on the left, the DVR "brain" on the right (which oddly looks like an alien being) and the HDMI cable.

Image

The camera does not include memory cards, however it uses inexpensive micro-SD cards. I have tried 32 GB and 64 GB cards with no problems. 64 GB at the highest quality setting gets you between 7-8 hours of video before it starts overwriting old files.

Image

The back of the box shows the included accessories.

Image

Going through the contents of the package, I found several adhesive-backed cable holders - intended for holding the camera HDMI cable (what they call the "brain" cable) in place on your bike. I ended up not needing these on my GL1500.

Image

The DVR is about 2 1/2 inches long. Visible on the left side are the USB power and HDMI ports.

Image

On the right side is the cover which lifts to reveal the Micro-SD slot.

Image

Looking at the top, you can see the two operational buttons: a power button and the WiFi actuation button. These are the only two controls on the device.

Image

The camera itself, seen here mounted into its mount is also about 2 1/2 inches in length.

Image

One side of the camera has a friction knob used to adjust the pitch angle of the camera. The camera is mounted to a "turntable" that allows the user to rotate the camera once installed.

Image

The camera is about 2 1/2 inches wide when looking at it from the front.

Image

Looking at the back of the camera, you can see the HDMI port.

Image

The HDMI cable is a rugged, cloth-covered cable that is rather stiff. This is a 3 meter (9 foot) cable - On the GL1500, I could have used about a third of this. Shorter cables are now available.

Image

Also included is a 12 volt to 5 volt USB power supply. It is connected to +12v power in your bike, and supplies the 5 volts required by the DVR.

Image

A USB power cord is also included. The cable includes a ferrite choke, to avoid interference.

Image

The large end of the USB cable has a silicone seal built into it to prevent moisture intrusion.

Image

A fused positive lead and a negative lead are included to wire into your bike.

Image

Two different bases for the DVR are included. The DVR slides and securely clips into both of them. The one on the left has a mounting clamp that is screwed into place once the cables are plugged in. This prevents vibration from allowing the cables to vibrate free of the DVR.

Image

Both bases have high-strength VHB adhesive on the bottom.

Image

Lastly we have some wire ties and two horrible "vampire" type power taps, which are the novice's way of tapping into power on your bike. I would suggest you throw these unreliable power taps in the garbage. They work by piercing the insulation on a wire and pushing against the wires inside, and while they work for a while, they tend to oxidize and lose connection over time.

Image

Some very basic instructions are included. These cover the connection of the unit, but not the operation. For operational instructions, it directs you to the manufacturer's web site.

Image

For initial testing, I hooked the unit up to a spare motorcycle battery.

Image

Plugging the silicone-sealed USB cable into the power supply seals the connection very well.

Image

The memory card cover rotates open, and a card is easily inserted.

Image

The HDMI "brain" cable uses somewhat non-standard ends. The ends, as you can see, are tapered. This provides a tight seal both at the DVR and at the camera as the cable is pressed into place.

Image

Plugged together, the connections look to be quite tight. I have high hopes that the camera end will remain weather-tight even through heavy rain.

Image

Once both the HDMI and the USB cables are plugged into the DVR, they can be locked in place by screwing down the retaining cap.

Image

Powering the device up, the "alien eyes" light up red to indicate it is operational. There is another status LED on the rear of the unit that flashes to indicate various modes.

My initial testing at this point showed that the camera produced video and successfully wrote it to the card. I downloaded the app to my Android (Samsung Note 4) phone, pressed the WiFi button on the DVR, and connected my phone to the WiFi network using the default password (eight zeroes). However, that's as far as I got - the app would never connect to the DVR.

After some frustration, I contacted Pier28. They indicated that updated camera firmware as well as an updated app were available. I downloaded and installed both. In the meantime, I started installing the camera on my GL1500.

Image

I planned to install the DVR in my right fairing pocket. The main problem is that I already have a ton of electronics and wiring in that pocket. I removed the pocket (remove the four screws holding it down, remove the set screw on the foot heater knob, remove the knob, and pull out the pocket) and made room in the wires.

Image

I fed the HDMI cable down the left side of the pocket.

Image

Pushing it down this way, it emerges at the bottom of the fairing, near the radiator cap. I removed the right inner cover in order to show this image (the same cover you remove to access the radiator cap).

Image

Looking up the fairing from below, I pulled the cable downward, between the fairing frame and the fairing. Also visible in this picture is the aftermarket driving light bracket with the "R" on it - your GL1500 would likely not have this bracket in place.

Image

Pulling the cable down farther, it emerges from the fairing bottom opening.

Image

I decided to mount my camera on the bottom of my upper fairing. I would have liked to have had it more centrally located, and farther forward, however had I hit a large bump causing the front suspension to compress would have caused the front wheel fender to impact the camera. Make sure you have clearance between the camera and the front wheel, forks and brake hoses. The location I am showing here is a safe one.

Image

Anytime you attach an item using VHB adhesive, you should first clean the surface being attached to with rubbing alcohol.

Image

This removes dirt, grime and oils that will cause the adhesive to not adhere properly.

Image

I plugged the (rather stiff) cable into the camera to make sure that when I installed it, there would not be pressure or stress on the camera from the cable.

Image

I made sure that I knew exactly where the camera was going - once the VHB adhesive touches the fairing, it's not coming off! I also made sure the camera was pointing exactly where I wanted it.

Image

I peeled back the cover on the VHB adhesive.

Image

I then applied the camera to the fairing and pressed it hard in place for 30 seconds.

Image

Looking down from above, the camera is hardly visible.

Image

Similarly, it does not stand out much when looking from below.

Image

I found that the camera tended to rotate slightly in the mount, due to the stiffness of the cable. This would give you a picture that was off-kilter. After a bit of experimentation, I found that a single layer of electrical tape, taped on the top half of the camera, fixed the problem - the mount was now perfectly tight and the camera did not budge. You just need to make sure the lines on either side of the lens are perfectly horizontal.

Image

I used a wire tie to secure the cable to the fairing frame, to prevent it from moving and chafing. It's always a good idea to inspect newly installed cables such as this after a few hours of riding to make sure they are not chafing unexpectedly.

Image

As I mentioned, the 3-meter (9 foot) long cable was far too long for this application. I coiled it around twice in the pocket cavity and tucked it up underneath the lip of the opening.

Image

Having fused power already available in my pocket area from other electronics I had installed, I crimped a two-pin Hitachi connector on the power supply leads, to make removal for service a quick and simple affair.

Image

Instead of the "vampire tap" connectors, I stripped and soldered my wires for a solid, reliable connection.

Image

I then covered the solder joints with heat-shrink tubing. This is without question the best way to do electrical work on your motorcycle: solder and heat-shrink tubing.

Image

Next I cut a small hole in the front of the right side pocket, for the wires to enter.

Image

The hole seen from inside the pocket.

Image

I then pulled the cables into the pocket, and plugged them into the DVR.

Image

Installing the DVR onto the base and screwing the cable clamp in place makes the connections secure.

With the new firmware installed in the camera and the new app installed on my phone, I powered up the bike. The DVR beeped as it turned on, and I then pressed the WiFi button. Starting the app, it identified the camera's WiFi network and connected almost instantly. This is what I was greeted with:

Image

Along with the live video image of my messy garage, it showed that I had been recording for 45 seconds, that there were just under 64 GB remaining on the memory card, and that this translated to just over 7 hours of recording time. I noticed that the time and date stamp on the video had been set automatically from my phone - a nice touch. This is extremely useful for aiming your camera - you can get instant feedback on where you have the camera pointed, instead of endless trial-and-error other cameras require.

Pressing the red circle button at the bottom of the screen stopped (and restarted) the video. If the video is stopped, you can then access the other options on the screen.

Image

Going into the configuration screen allows you to change many configuration options.

Resolution: You can choose between 1080P at 30 frames per second or 720P at 60 frames per second.

Time lapse is just that - a single frame taken every few seconds (configurable from between 1 per second to 1 per minute). When it is off, it takes realtime video.

Loop Record: When off, the camera stops when the memory card is full. When on, the camera deletes the oldest file when full and continues recording.

Video Time: The camera records into files that contain between 1 minute and 15 minutes each.

G-Sensor Sensitivity: The DVR detects impacts. When it detects an impact, it writes a special "event" video file recording the impact, which will not be erased by loop recording.

Audio record: Turns the microphone built into the DVR on or off.

Date stamp: Enables the appearance of the date stamp on lower left of the video image.

Quality: Fine, Good or Normal. Fine is obviously best, apparently "Good" is better than "Normal." I expect the higher the quality, the faster it uses memory on the card.

Image Size: Size of the image written when still images are taken.

There are other configuration options, all described in the manual.

Image

Somewhat useful is the ability to view and download video and images from the camera on your phone. A list of the files on the DVR will appear, along with a datestamp and size. You can download the file to your phone, or delete it from the camera. I call this "somewhat useful" because the amount of time it takes to download a typical file is massive - a five minute file is usually around 700 MB, which takes several minutes to download. It's much faster to pop the card out of the camera and stick it into an SD card reader attached to your computer.

Image

And lastly, we have the ability to take still images. I have no idea why you would want to do this, but hey, if you want the capability, there it is. The images it takes are of excellent quality.


Right, now on to the part I know you want to see: sample video. I compiled video taken at various times of the day into a short video which you can view here. I would suggest you switch to full-screen when viewing this. Keep in mind that YouTube applies significant compression to videos that contain motion (and that means pretty much the entire picture on these videos). This means what you see here is not anywhere near as clear as the images actually recorded on the video that you will see from the camera. I'd love to post them online for you to view, but at almost a gigabyte apiece, that's just not practical. I did record some still images in these videos to give you a better idea how it looks without YouTube compression getting in the way:





All videos are taken with the camera you saw installed. The night portion of the video is illuminated with my two 35 watt HID headlights as well as two 55-watt halogen driving lights.

If you wish to see longer parts of some of these videos, you can see them here:











Conclusion

Like I said, I have been looking for the "perfect" DVR camera for my motorcycle for a very long time. I am very happy to say that I have finally found it. A combination of very high quality images, excellent light sensitivity and adaptation to rapid light changes, excellent sharpness, solid firmware that does not crash or lose files, and the bonus of a WiFi-enabled smartphone app makes this, in my opinion, the best motorcycle camera on the market today.



User avatar
NVSB4
Posts: 1127
Joined: Sat Mar 03, 2012 6:39 pm
Location: Arlington, Texas
Motorcycle: 1996 GL1500SE
1992 GL1500I (sold)
1986 GL1200A (sold)
2002 HD FXDL Low Rider (sold)
1993 Yamaha Virago XV1000 (sold)
Too many others to list

Re: BulletHD Biker Pro Camera Review

Postby NVSB4 » Sun Sep 27, 2015 9:47 pm

I've been toying with the notion of getting a camera, but didn't like having the plastic box sitting out in the open for all to see.
I could just imagine someone feeling that they needed it more than I did the first time I forgot to take it off and put it away.
These bullet cameras do seem to solve that problem by being inconspicuous.

I too would like to have it more centered so that I can see what has happened on the other side of the front.
Watching your videos, however shows all of the front tire bounce that would put an end to the new toy.
The only middle mount that I've seen was behind the windshield and that would have it in the open again.
It's never too late to have a happy childhood!

Image

Image
Red=All bikes Blue=Wings

Chris

User avatar
WingAdmin
Site Admin
Posts: 17046
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 4:16 pm
Location: Strongsville, OH
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1982 GL1100A Aspencade (sold)
1989 PC800 (wife's!)
1998 XV250 Virago (sold)
2007 Aspen Sentry Trailer

Re: BulletHD Biker Pro Camera Review

Postby WingAdmin » Sun Sep 27, 2015 9:56 pm

NVSB4 wrote:I've been toying with the notion of getting a camera, but didn't like having the plastic box sitting out in the open for all to see.
I could just imagine someone feeling that they needed it more than I did the first time I forgot to take it off and put it away.
These bullet cameras do seem to solve that problem by being inconspicuous.

I too would like to have it more centered so that I can see what has happened on the other side of the front.
Watching your videos, however shows all of the front tire bounce that would put an end to the new toy.
The only middle mount that I've seen was behind the windshield and that would have it in the open again.


I honestly did spend quite a bit of time looking for the best place to mount it. I wanted it out of the way, which eliminated crash-bar mounting or top-of-the-fairing mounting. I also wanted it mostly invisible unless you really looked, which eliminated side of the fairing, etc. The position I used was the best compromise, it has wide enough field of view that it gives you a full view (left to right) of where you're going. I wish I could have had it looking down from a higher position, but again, it's compromise. I considered hiding it in the vent below the headlight, but that was more modification than I wanted to get into, and again - it would be fairly visible.

User avatar
spiralout
Posts: 1049
Joined: Sun Feb 17, 2013 6:41 pm
Location: Alabama
Motorcycle: 1975 GL1000 (gone)
1980 GL1100I (with '77 1000 engine)
1996 GL1500 SE

Re: BulletHD Biker Pro Camera Review

Postby spiralout » Sun Sep 27, 2015 10:58 pm

As usual, another well done review, boss. This cam looks really interesting but out of my price range for now.
You said that a 5 minute file was around 700MB. Was that using the highest bit rate with H.264 MOV output?

I can see Dell filing suit against these guys for the similarities to the Alienware logo, too ;)

User avatar
alwims
Posts: 126
Joined: Fri Feb 21, 2014 12:17 pm
Location: Wheatland, Mo, but living in Edinburg, Texas
Motorcycle: 1987 GL1200 Aspencade
2008 GL1800

Re: BulletHD Biker Pro Camera Review

Postby alwims » Mon Sep 28, 2015 7:42 am

I like the Bullet so well I've got 3 of them. 1 for the bike, Pickup and Car. I'm having a few glitches so I'm going to go look for a firmware update. Nothing major just annoying. Like you I have wasted enough money on other cameras I could have bought myself a fine 1911. The video quality is almost as good as a GoPro. I say almost because when you view the 2 videos side by side you can see some very slight clarity differences. The Bullet uses ambient light a whole lot better than the GoPro so night videos are far superior to anything I have tested. All in all, I agree with WingAdmin, these are great cameras. One thing I forgot. If you mount the alien eyes in the wrong place the microphone will pick up a lot of wind noise. I fixed that on the bike by gluing a piece of microphone foam over the mic hole. On the wife's convertible it picks up wind noise when she has the top down.

User avatar
WingAdmin
Site Admin
Posts: 17046
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 4:16 pm
Location: Strongsville, OH
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1982 GL1100A Aspencade (sold)
1989 PC800 (wife's!)
1998 XV250 Virago (sold)
2007 Aspen Sentry Trailer

Re: BulletHD Biker Pro Camera Review

Postby WingAdmin » Mon Sep 28, 2015 9:01 am

spiralout wrote:As usual, another well done review, boss. This cam looks really interesting but out of my price range for now.
You said that a 5 minute file was around 700MB. Was that using the highest bit rate with H.264 MOV output?

I can see Dell filing suit against these guys for the similarities to the Alienware logo, too ;)


That's correct, highest bit rate, and it outputs a H.264 encoded MOV file.

OldSchool_IsCool
Posts: 24
Joined: Mon Nov 15, 2010 10:25 am
Location: Kalamazoo, MI
Motorcycle: '82 GL1100-I
'82 CM250C
'77 CB550 K3
'74 CB750 K4

Re: BulletHD Biker Pro Camera Review

Postby OldSchool_IsCool » Mon Sep 28, 2015 9:35 am

Great review Admin!

I've been looking for an on-bike, permanently installed DVR/Camera(s) "dashcam" system for a few months now. This one hits most of the important "Must Haves" that I've considered.

One item from my wish list that this setup lacks is a second camera for watching my 6 (rear view). I suppose I could install a second unit. But that raises a question, how would a second unit (i.e. a second WiFi access point) behave with the first unit? Would it simply be a matter of shutting down the WiFi on which ever unit is active before starting the WiFi on the 2nd?

You don't by chance have secret knowledge of BikerPRO planning to release a unit with dual-cams and integrated playback, eh?

Some other wishlist items (i.e. nice to haves) would be playback with GPS location, speed, date and time, maybe even some key system status indicators like brake lights, turn signals and engine RPM. I've seen this on some high-end units, but the DVR is the size of a lunch box and is really intended for fleet managers to monitor their driver's. And yes, those boxes ARE black! :lol: But like a said, these are just some features I've seen on other units, not a show stopper if they are missing.

User avatar
alwims
Posts: 126
Joined: Fri Feb 21, 2014 12:17 pm
Location: Wheatland, Mo, but living in Edinburg, Texas
Motorcycle: 1987 GL1200 Aspencade
2008 GL1800

Re: BulletHD Biker Pro Camera Review

Postby alwims » Mon Sep 28, 2015 10:39 am

OldSchool_IsCool wrote:Great review Admin!

One item from my wish list that this setup lacks is a second camera for watching my 6 (rear view). I suppose I could install a second unit. But that raises a question, how would a second unit (i.e. a second WiFi access point) behave with the first unit? Would it simply be a matter of shutting down the WiFi on which ever unit is active before starting the WiFi on the 2nd? Yes

Some other wishlist items (i.e. nice to haves) would be playback with GPS location, speed, date and time, maybe even some key system status indicators like brake lights, turn signals and engine RPM. I've seen this on some high-end units, but the DVR is the size of a lunch box and is really intended for fleet managers to monitor their driver's. And yes, those boxes ARE black! :lol: But like a said, these are just some features I've seen on other units, not a show stopper if they are missing.


I'm certainly not trying to butt in WingAdmin, but I can answer some of this. There is no GPS or system status indicators. It beeps when it comes on and it beeps when it goes off.

As for a second camera, each camera sends out it's own unique wifi signal and IP address so for a second camera you would need to unhook your phone wifi from one to the other.

User avatar
WingAdmin
Site Admin
Posts: 17046
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 4:16 pm
Location: Strongsville, OH
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1982 GL1100A Aspencade (sold)
1989 PC800 (wife's!)
1998 XV250 Virago (sold)
2007 Aspen Sentry Trailer

Re: BulletHD Biker Pro Camera Review

Postby WingAdmin » Mon Sep 28, 2015 10:56 am

OldSchool_IsCool wrote:Great review Admin!

I've been looking for an on-bike, permanently installed DVR/Camera(s) "dashcam" system for a few months now. This one hits most of the important "Must Haves" that I've considered.

One item from my wish list that this setup lacks is a second camera for watching my 6 (rear view). I suppose I could install a second unit. But that raises a question, how would a second unit (i.e. a second WiFi access point) behave with the first unit? Would it simply be a matter of shutting down the WiFi on which ever unit is active before starting the WiFi on the 2nd?

You don't by chance have secret knowledge of BikerPRO planning to release a unit with dual-cams and integrated playback, eh?

Some other wishlist items (i.e. nice to haves) would be playback with GPS location, speed, date and time, maybe even some key system status indicators like brake lights, turn signals and engine RPM. I've seen this on some high-end units, but the DVR is the size of a lunch box and is really intended for fleet managers to monitor their driver's. And yes, those boxes ARE black! :lol: But like a said, these are just some features I've seen on other units, not a show stopper if they are missing.


I also would love a second, rear-facing camera (i.e. lawyer/liability camera). I don't know of a product they have planned for this - I have seen a few different units that do offer this feature, and in every case the implementation is sub-standard: the second camera has poor resolution, or the file written containing both images is a non-standard format, or the image written has the rear camera as a tiny "picture in picture." I think the only realistic method (and I'm sure the one they would love you to use) is to purchase a second camera.

GPS location would be great, and several cameras offer that, but to me that's not a huge requirement. What I *would* love (that would come from GPS implementation) is on-screen speed - although you technically could run into liability issues with this.

I also would love status indicators - just having 3-4 input lines on the unit that put a letter ("B" for brakes, etc.) on the video image when it sees voltage on the appropriate input line. I can say as a former racing team crew member, that this would be HUGE for racing drivers, who want to see at what point they are braking, when they are accelerating, and so on.

As for dual units with WiFi - I doubt it would be an issue. You have to press the button to turn the WiFi on, so you could turn on just one at a time. Alternatively, you can rename the WiFi networks to whatever you want (and change their passwords) so you could technically have both on at the same time. When you start the app, it asks which network you want to connect to, so it would be quite easy to name one network "FrontCam" and one "RearCam" - and just pick the one you wanted when you started the app.

User avatar
NVSB4
Posts: 1127
Joined: Sat Mar 03, 2012 6:39 pm
Location: Arlington, Texas
Motorcycle: 1996 GL1500SE
1992 GL1500I (sold)
1986 GL1200A (sold)
2002 HD FXDL Low Rider (sold)
1993 Yamaha Virago XV1000 (sold)
Too many others to list

Re: BulletHD Biker Pro Camera Review

Postby NVSB4 » Mon Sep 28, 2015 5:53 pm

WingAdmin wrote:What I *would* love (that would come from GPS implementation) is on-screen speed - although you technically could run into liability issues with this.


I run into enough issues with speed when the wife is on the back, much less if it was recorded. :D
It's never too late to have a happy childhood!

Image

Image
Red=All bikes Blue=Wings

Chris

User avatar
FM-USA
Posts: 2005
Joined: Wed May 18, 2011 8:40 am
Location: USA-ILL-60085
Motorcycle: .
'91 GL1500-I (Dbl-Darkside)
Acquired:__51K_Jun_??/2007
MADE_IT!_200K_Oct_17/2016
iRide 24/365 99% SmileMiles
================
"You don't buy yourself a
HD to be SATISFIED,...
you buy it to keep your
HD friends PACIFIED."
================
|
ANTAGONISTS need not post.
|
==================

Re: BulletHD Biker Pro Camera Review

Postby FM-USA » Thu Oct 01, 2015 7:34 am

Fine write up w-pix.

It's a shame this cam can't see license plates clearly, something badly needed for legalities.
I'm still searching for one that sees a persons face. So far just the higher end cams will do that.... if only I had that kind of moolah.

I have a new and really cheap car cam with sound recording now but the quality is pathetic.
No bells or whistles. Can't complain, for $9.00 w-shipping.
"OIL CHANGE?" _FM 07-2009
Know its new taste and be loyal, you'll know when to change that oil.
Taste testing as the miles flow, souring as that acid grows.
And don't flirt with dirt or darkened oil, all the faster your engine will spoil.

User avatar
NVSB4
Posts: 1127
Joined: Sat Mar 03, 2012 6:39 pm
Location: Arlington, Texas
Motorcycle: 1996 GL1500SE
1992 GL1500I (sold)
1986 GL1200A (sold)
2002 HD FXDL Low Rider (sold)
1993 Yamaha Virago XV1000 (sold)
Too many others to list

Re: BulletHD Biker Pro Camera Review

Postby NVSB4 » Thu Oct 01, 2015 9:46 am

FM-USA wrote:It's a shame this cam can't see license plates clearly, something badly needed for legalities.
I'm still searching for one that sees a persons face.


Depending on the situation, if the car was shown in the initial footage, you could get close enough for the camera to capture the plate clearer.
For the person't face, you could always pull up beside them and snap a pic with a hand held while you are showing them that they are #1 in your book. :D
It's never too late to have a happy childhood!

Image

Image
Red=All bikes Blue=Wings

Chris

dheaton
Posts: 26
Joined: Fri Apr 20, 2012 10:54 am
Location: Boulder, Utah
Motorcycle: Goldwing 1800 "04"

Re: BulletHD Biker Pro Camera Review

Postby dheaton » Thu Oct 01, 2015 10:10 am

Nice review. I use the gopro camera and like it but for the reasons you mentioned about it being visible to everyone and I have to take it off (not too big a deal) every time I leave the bike.

My question is are you using this camera for protection of other drivers hitting you or cutting you off? Or are you using it to record scenery? Both? Just curious.

User avatar
WingAdmin
Site Admin
Posts: 17046
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 4:16 pm
Location: Strongsville, OH
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1982 GL1100A Aspencade (sold)
1989 PC800 (wife's!)
1998 XV250 Virago (sold)
2007 Aspen Sentry Trailer

Re: BulletHD Biker Pro Camera Review

Postby WingAdmin » Thu Oct 01, 2015 10:17 am

FM-USA wrote:Fine write up w-pix.

It's a shame this cam can't see license plates clearly, something badly needed for legalities.
I'm still searching for one that sees a persons face. So far just the higher end cams will do that.... if only I had that kind of moolah.

I have a new and really cheap car cam with sound recording now but the quality is pathetic.
No bells or whistles. Can't complain, for $9.00 w-shipping.


On the original footage (not necessarily the footage you see above which has had YouTube compressed applied to it) you could freeze-frame on cars and quite clearly pick out license plates that weren't really far away - but during daytime hours only. As I mentioned at night-time the shutter speed is lengthened enough that fast-moving things become a blur.

User avatar
WingAdmin
Site Admin
Posts: 17046
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 4:16 pm
Location: Strongsville, OH
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1982 GL1100A Aspencade (sold)
1989 PC800 (wife's!)
1998 XV250 Virago (sold)
2007 Aspen Sentry Trailer

Re: BulletHD Biker Pro Camera Review

Postby WingAdmin » Thu Oct 01, 2015 10:19 am

dheaton wrote:Nice review. I use the gopro camera and like it but for the reasons you mentioned about it being visible to everyone and I have to take it off (not too big a deal) every time I leave the bike.

My question is are you using this camera for protection of other drivers hitting you or cutting you off? Or are you using it to record scenery? Both? Just curious.


A little bit of both. It obviously won't catch someone rear-ending you, but the most common car/motorcycle accident, a car failing to yield (i.e. pulling out in front of, or turning left in front of you) it would most definitely record this. I wanted something that would record this kind of bone-headed cage driver action, but also be useful for recording high-quality scenic videos.

dheaton
Posts: 26
Joined: Fri Apr 20, 2012 10:54 am
Location: Boulder, Utah
Motorcycle: Goldwing 1800 "04"

Re: BulletHD Biker Pro Camera Review

Postby dheaton » Thu Oct 01, 2015 10:27 am

Thanks for the quick reply. I use my gopro for recording my trips (scenery) and complement them with some still I take with my REAL camera. Kinda fun. That link in your first post to the camera lists it at $169.95. Is that the same version you have and have you heard anything about an update with 1080P at 60FPS? The price is not bad I just want higher rez. for my videos. Thanks again

sfruechte
Posts: 193
Joined: Tue Mar 09, 2010 12:53 pm
Location: La Crosse, WI
Motorcycle: 1977 GL1000

Re: BulletHD Biker Pro Camera Review

Postby sfruechte » Thu Oct 01, 2015 10:39 am

One hour on a battery? That's not much.

User avatar
NVSB4
Posts: 1127
Joined: Sat Mar 03, 2012 6:39 pm
Location: Arlington, Texas
Motorcycle: 1996 GL1500SE
1992 GL1500I (sold)
1986 GL1200A (sold)
2002 HD FXDL Low Rider (sold)
1993 Yamaha Virago XV1000 (sold)
Too many others to list

Re: BulletHD Biker Pro Camera Review

Postby NVSB4 » Thu Oct 01, 2015 11:01 am

sfruechte wrote:One hour on a battery? That's not much.


The battery is only for a backup. The kit includes a power converter with a power converter as shown in one of the pictures.
It's never too late to have a happy childhood!

Image

Image
Red=All bikes Blue=Wings

Chris

User avatar
WingAdmin
Site Admin
Posts: 17046
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 4:16 pm
Location: Strongsville, OH
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1982 GL1100A Aspencade (sold)
1989 PC800 (wife's!)
1998 XV250 Virago (sold)
2007 Aspen Sentry Trailer

Re: BulletHD Biker Pro Camera Review

Postby WingAdmin » Thu Oct 01, 2015 11:05 am

NVSB4 wrote:
sfruechte wrote:One hour on a battery? That's not much.


The battery is only for a backup. The kit includes a power converter with a power converter as shown in one of the pictures.


Right. The unit WILL run off the battery for an hour, but normally it runs off your bike power, and the only time the battery is being used is for a few seconds after you shut your bike off - during which time it is finishing writing the file to the card and shutting down. Other than that, the only thing the battery is used for is to keep the clock running.

User avatar
WingAdmin
Site Admin
Posts: 17046
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 4:16 pm
Location: Strongsville, OH
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1982 GL1100A Aspencade (sold)
1989 PC800 (wife's!)
1998 XV250 Virago (sold)
2007 Aspen Sentry Trailer

Re: BulletHD Biker Pro Camera Review

Postby WingAdmin » Thu Oct 01, 2015 11:07 am

dheaton wrote:Thanks for the quick reply. I use my gopro for recording my trips (scenery) and complement them with some still I take with my REAL camera. Kinda fun. That link in your first post to the camera lists it at $169.95. Is that the same version you have and have you heard anything about an update with 1080P at 60FPS? The price is not bad I just want higher rez. for my videos. Thanks again


Yes, that's the same version I have. I have not heard of an update to the higher frame rate - that said, the limitation may be hardware vs software - the hardware encoding chip that does the H.264 compression may not be capable of encoding 1080P at 60FPS. I would have to defer to the manufacturer on that.

jandranj
Posts: 1
Joined: Wed Sep 28, 2011 9:46 pm
Location: Ft. Walton Beach, FL
Motorcycle: 1982 gl1100 aspencade

Re: BulletHD Biker Pro Camera Review

Postby jandranj » Thu Oct 01, 2015 5:51 pm

I was wondering if you should have passed the three cars in a no passing zone? And was that a complete stop at the stop signs? Drive safe and live. Sorry but I have been riding motor cycles for 58 years and always try to obay the laws. Only had one mishap when I was young and foolish driving in a belly washer. I love the site and keep up the good work. Jim

User avatar
Pier28
Posts: 30
Joined: Thu Oct 01, 2015 11:41 am
Location: Dayton, Nevada (USA)
Motorcycle: http:/Shop.Pier28.com

Re: BulletHD Biker Pro Camera Review

Postby Pier28 » Thu Oct 01, 2015 7:27 pm

Hey Everyone, I just signed up to the forum here.

I'm quite active on the dashcamtalk forum as you can see here:
https://dashcamtalk.com/forum/members/

Great Review, I wanted to post a few other related links:

Our original product launch thread:
https://dashcamtalk.com/forum/threads/b ... 655.12423/
(lots of other videos here)

Two Goldwing installs (old and new) photos + video
https://dashcamtalk.com/forum/threads/b ... cle.13403/

I'll re-read through everyone's replies to this thread in a bit and reply directly to any unanswered questions.

If anyone has any questions, we are always happy to help!
~Jon
Pier28, Inc.
https://shop.pier28.com/index.php/contacts/
415-938-7437

User avatar
spiralout
Posts: 1049
Joined: Sun Feb 17, 2013 6:41 pm
Location: Alabama
Motorcycle: 1975 GL1000 (gone)
1980 GL1100I (with '77 1000 engine)
1996 GL1500 SE

Re: BulletHD Biker Pro Camera Review

Postby spiralout » Thu Oct 01, 2015 7:31 pm

jandranj wrote:I was wondering if you should have passed the three cars in a no passing zone? And was that a complete stop at the stop signs? Drive safe and live. Sorry but I have been riding motor cycles for 58 years and always try to obay the laws. Only had one mishap when I was young and foolish driving in a belly washer. I love the site and keep up the good work. Jim


Lol, WA's riding got a long time member to make a first post :lol: :lol:
I grew up a few miles down Hwy 98 from Ft Walton/Mary Ester. That's a good town to get deals on used sport bikes, with all the turnaround of personnel at Eglin and Hurlbert bases.

User avatar
FM-USA
Posts: 2005
Joined: Wed May 18, 2011 8:40 am
Location: USA-ILL-60085
Motorcycle: .
'91 GL1500-I (Dbl-Darkside)
Acquired:__51K_Jun_??/2007
MADE_IT!_200K_Oct_17/2016
iRide 24/365 99% SmileMiles
================
"You don't buy yourself a
HD to be SATISFIED,...
you buy it to keep your
HD friends PACIFIED."
================
|
ANTAGONISTS need not post.
|
==================

Re: BulletHD Biker Pro Camera Review

Postby FM-USA » Thu Oct 01, 2015 9:31 pm

I'm not trying to be a spoiler here but why is it all the videos (including the sellers site) not in there original format?
Why let the poorer video format dictate a lower quality cam?

JUST ask'n.

.
"OIL CHANGE?" _FM 07-2009
Know its new taste and be loyal, you'll know when to change that oil.
Taste testing as the miles flow, souring as that acid grows.
And don't flirt with dirt or darkened oil, all the faster your engine will spoil.

User avatar
WingAdmin
Site Admin
Posts: 17046
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 4:16 pm
Location: Strongsville, OH
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1982 GL1100A Aspencade (sold)
1989 PC800 (wife's!)
1998 XV250 Virago (sold)
2007 Aspen Sentry Trailer

Re: BulletHD Biker Pro Camera Review

Postby WingAdmin » Thu Oct 01, 2015 9:57 pm

FM-USA wrote:I'm not trying to be a spoiler here but why is it all the videos (including the sellers site) not in there original format?
Why let the poorer video format dictate a lower quality cam?

JUST ask'n.

.


Because the original format videos are MASSIVE, at over 150 MB per minute of video. For most Internet users it would take several minutes to download each minute of video, so they wouldn't stream in real-time. In addition, hosting huge files like that, which are then downloaded by hundreds or even thousands of users causes huge bandwidth usage on the server, which is expensive. A three-minute video, hosted on my server, and downloaded by 500 people would use up 135 gigabytes of bandwidth!

The only realistic way to do it is to upload it to YouTube, allow YouTube to compress them for streaming playback, and explain this reason.




Return to “Product Reviews”




Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests