Stainless steel wool for exhaust packing


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DJnRF
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Stainless steel wool for exhaust packing

Postby DJnRF » Mon Aug 11, 2014 3:15 pm



In adding packing to quiet the exhaust system the best steel wool to use is
one of a course Stainless Steel wool. The one that I have found describes it
in the following manner:

"Made from long lasting corrosion resistant stainless steel Alloy 434.
Highly Resistant to Exhaust Acids and High Vibration,
An Excellent Material for Muffler Baffling.
Excellent for noise reduction and heat insulation.
Heat Resistance up to to 1500 Fahrenheit."

I bought a pack of eight pads on eBay for $8.95 and $4.33 shipping.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/310192153355?_t ... EBIDX%3AIT
The company (Lustersheen) has more info on its web site. The
seller's (pawts) shipping was very fast.

I intend to try stuffing a couple of pads up in the tailpipe and
securing them in with a couple of stainless steel screws to quiet
my exhaust some.

In looking for stainless steel pads to use I found a lot about the
different types of stainless steel wool. Most will not take the
heat, moisture, and acids of an exhaust system, and will come
apart soon. This pad is the only one even listed by this company
that is shown for exhaust packing. The others they have are not.

This info should be a help to anyone that wishes to get such
pads for their exhaust system.

Dave.


"Survival is one's own ability to cope with and overcome any adverse or threatening situation, condition, casualty or event." ©Dj 1969

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Re: Stainless steel wool for exhaust packing

Postby WingAdmin » Tue Aug 19, 2014 12:45 pm

Thanks for this, I'm going to move this to the Reference forum.

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Re: Stainless steel wool for exhaust packing

Postby roadwanderer2 » Sun Apr 26, 2015 7:18 am

hey Dave,

this is an interesting concept. my question is how many pads did you use in each muffler, and other than stuffing them up the back ends of the tail pipes, would they be more effective if you put them in front of the baffles, say thru the cross tube or even down the front of the pipes just below the exhaust manifolds where they bolt up to the motor. since i have my exhaust system off the bike's motor i was thinking about doing this before i bolt them back on.

stuart.

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Re: Stainless steel wool for exhaust packing

Postby DJnRF » Sun Apr 26, 2015 10:50 am

roadwanderer2 wrote:hey Dave,

this is an interesting concept. my question is how many pads did you use in each muffler, and other than stuffing them up the back ends of the tail pipes, would they be more effective if you put them in front of the baffles, say thru the cross tube or even down the front of the pipes just below the exhaust manifolds where they bolt up to the motor. since i have my exhaust system off the bike's motor i was thinking about doing this before i bolt them back on.

stuart.



Hi Stu,

Quieting all depends upon how many pads you use, and how quiet you want it to become.
I cut down fairly with just one, but two might work best.

As far as which way would work, I just used the method I found somewhere. Might have
even been in here, or in one of the other three forums on GW's I have looked into. Most
times a person doesn't have their exhaust off the machine when they would like to make
it more quiet. Since you already have it off, I might look into putting them before the
baffles. In that way you would not have to drill a hole for a bolt to insure them staying
in the exhaust.

As I see it, you would have to insure that you have something to 'pack' them against the
baffles, mostly around the outsides. Getting something to do this well is a real trick
whichever way you do it due to the curves in the pipe.

Just make sure that you use the Stainless Steel pads, and not regular steel wool. I
ordered mine online from a place that carried them specifically for motorcycle exhaust.
Off hand I can't remember the site, but I could try to find it in my old files. There are
pads of course, medium and fine, etc. I think I got the course, but can't remember
for sure right now. I believe I have the extras left here, if I can find where I put them.
I will do some checking. If I can find them 'reasonably' quick, I can send some to you.

I have been really busy here. I even had to go through retraining, and retake all the
tests again for my medical license. Boy, much is changed in diagnosis these days.
When I first went through it all to get my license I was trained in diagnostics. That
changed for others after my schooling. It became assessment based treatment only.
They were concentrating on just keeping a person alive to get them to a hospital.
No schooling was aimed at diagnosis, even though such a method could prepare a
hospital to have proper treatments ready before the patient arrived. That time
factor finally proved to be necessary. As such I had to go through all the retraining
even though that was how I was trained many years ago. Of course, I did learn
much of the new ideas, and methods that I have never needed before now. Now,
my license is good until 2019 before I will have to take the next relicense exam.
It has taken me the last eight months to get through this. The college uses all
computerized testing, and grading these days. We always had the paper tests,
and all had to be hand graded. One had to wait one to four weeks to find out if
they passed the tests. Computer grading gives that answer right now.

The real problem is that I not only have trouble in treating a person in the field,
but by the time I would need to take the relicense exam I will have probably
already died. lol At least a doctor can make his 'millions' and retire to a more
even relaxed life than any medic. lol Doctors start out in the field more for
the money, while EMT's get into it more for helping people, and not money.
Isn't that backwards from what it should be??? Oh, well. Such is life.

I have my machine in an unusable state right now also. I have been so busy
with this home, and no heat in the garage that I could not work on it during
the winter. Winter has been all inside the home, and now trying to work on
the drive, yard, car, and motorcycle all at once. I hope to get the car, and
motorcycle going soon. The dang 10 mpg in my truck is horrid, and costing
me over $200 per month to drive. I can't wait to have my wife driving the
car while I ride all the miles I have to do.

Take care,
Dave.
"Survival is one's own ability to cope with and overcome any adverse or threatening situation, condition, casualty or event." ©Dj 1969

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Re: Stainless steel wool for exhaust packing

Postby roadwanderer2 » Sun Apr 26, 2015 3:18 pm

Hey Dave.

im thinking since i already have the mufflers down and apart, if i go from each front header pipe, i can take a wire coat hanger, double it over and bend the end of it flat across, i might be able to stuff 1 steel wool pad down into the left and another pad down the right header pipe and one in each side of the cross tube. that SHOULD be enough to quiet it down without restricting any air flow or back pressure. that should put 2 on each side, one down each of the fronts, and one down each side of the cross tube.

stuart.

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Re: Stainless steel wool for exhaust packing

Postby DJnRF » Sun Apr 26, 2015 5:29 pm

roadwanderer2 wrote:Hey Dave.

im thinking since i already have the mufflers down and apart, if i go from each front header pipe, i can take a wire coat hanger, double it over and bend the end of it flat across, i might be able to stuff 1 steel wool pad down into the left and another pad down the right header pipe and one in each side of the cross tube. that SHOULD be enough to quiet it down without restricting any air flow or back pressure. that should put 2 on each side, one down each of the fronts, and one down each side of the cross tube.

stuart.



Hi Stu,

I don't think the cross tube matters as it is before the baffles also. Both down the pipe onto the
baffles would be better, I think. Also, I am not sure that a coat hanger would be strong enough.
Not even when doubled. If, it is, I would bend the end pushing the pads down into a circle just
a bit smaller than the size of the pad in the pipes. You would be able to pack it against the
baffles better than if straight, or just a 90 degree bend. It would not be good to have the
wire poking through the steel wool, and also remember that there is the exhaust hole in the
middle of the baffles. Baffles are nothing more than a series of 'compartments' made much
like washers in a pipe. The exhaust has to have a large enough 'hole' to pass through. In
the section of baffles (even if they are just flat half-plates welded in and staggered down
the pipe, and/ or also has packing of steel wool type stuff, or fiberglass in each baffle
compartment) to have restricting the flow to cause undue back pressure on the engine.

Baffles in a tanker truck actually are compartments with an oval hole of only 18 or 20 inches
close to the bottom of the tank. Workers and kids sometimes get overcome by lack of O2,
or fumes at times, and we have to go in to rescue them. Quite a scarey thing. I know! I
have had to do that before. I can't even climb through that hole wearing my oxygen tank.
(and gear) I have to take it off, and put it through the hole first, then I can make it through,
and keep pushing it ahead of me as long as I am in the tank. Just plain dark, and scarey.
It is even worse when trying to bring someone out that can't crawl out themselves.

Anyway, you should have some idea of how baffles are made. How many 'compartments' are
in such a tube, tank, pipe, all depends upon the length, and the design by a manufacturer.
(I have twelve in my head alone. Of course, mine all have a restricted flow where nothing
gets through.) Such is life for me. lol

Take care,
Dave.
"Survival is one's own ability to cope with and overcome any adverse or threatening situation, condition, casualty or event." ©Dj 1969

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Re: Stainless steel wool for exhaust packing

Postby roadwanderer2 » Sun Apr 26, 2015 8:28 pm

Hey Dave, after working in the exhaust system field for 20 some odd years, i know what the insides of a muffler looks like. there are many different types of mufflers and different chambers and cross tubes that run thru the insides. some motorcycle mufflers are also different in their designs by the baffles and the fiber packing, that's what gives them their different sounds.

when i mentioned using a coat hanger, i meant doubling it and making the one end into an "L" shape where its nice and rigid so it wont bend or tear thru the steel wool as you push it down into the pipe.

below are pics of what the inside of a common motorcycle muffler looks like, and one from a car or truck. and with this posting, I bid you all a good night. sleep well,

stuart.
Attachments

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DJnRF
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Re: Stainless steel wool for exhaust packing

Postby DJnRF » Sun Apr 26, 2015 10:44 pm

Hi Stu,

Your top image is a type 16 type muffler, and the second one is a type 20.
The type 7 is like the 16 other than the fact that instead of just a glass
type high heat packing it also has a stainless steel mesh wrap packing over
the center tube, and then the glass packing. The stainless steel helps to
prevent blow-outs as well as some sound reduction. The glass packing
(or other heat resistant sound absorption material) is then protected from
blow-outs, and does the majority of sound reduction.

The amount of stainless steel in motorcycle mufflers is one of the
factors that contribute to the high cost of those things. Personally, I
would like to insure that I have three, or more, compartments by the
additional baffles. That makes for more chance of sound absorption
without causing restriction to the exhaust. No baffle is like the old
typical 'GlasPac' mufflers of days gone by. Of course, the 'glass' always
was spent by blow-outs all too soon for my liking. The old Cherry Bomb
models were cheap (only $5 in my days) and sounded neat, but got
loud in short order. For the price, I would hope they are built better
today.

I once made a silencer for a rifle. I put eight baffles in it around the
perf-tube. It worked perfectly with brass screen wire for the packing.
The only problem was that after about a dozen rounds it had to be
taken apart and cleaned of all the trapped powder solids in the wire.
Each baffle caused the gases to accumulate in that 'compartment'
and slowly allow them to escape to flow out with the natural
remaining and flowing gases. The absorption is what silences, but
must release the gas (or exhaust) pressure so that the tube doesn't
get over-pressured.

With engines, just like firearms, the larger the engine (caliber) the
more the exhaust. (gases) Unfortunately, these larger engine
motorcycle mufflers are getting so high priced, a large pipe that
just extends into the air like the pipes on a semi are becoming a
real interest to me. Get the loud sound up, and away from the
ground level. lol

Take care,
Dave.
"Survival is one's own ability to cope with and overcome any adverse or threatening situation, condition, casualty or event." ©Dj 1969

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Re: Stainless steel wool for exhaust packing

Postby FM-USA » Mon Apr 27, 2015 8:22 am

Ya, regular Stainless Steel clogs too quick, tried'm.
Below are from almost any "Dollar Store", really cheap.



I just reshape to fit (NOT to tight) the tailpipe and drilled an angled hole through the tailpipes end and slip a 1/4" x 2 inch long bolt. No nut needed since the pad will hold it in place and keep it from rattling.

I keep a couple baggies handy if I need to change the sound or remove it for that...
RUMBLE




I'll get great laughs from passing HD guys when the pads start to fray (hair) and hang out the tailpipe.
:lol:
.
"OIL CHANGE?" _FM 07-2009
Know its new taste and be loyal, you'll know when to change that oil.
Taste testing as the miles flow, souring as that acid grows.
And don't flirt with dirt or darkened oil, all the faster your engine will spoil.

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DJnRF
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Joined: Fri Oct 04, 2013 8:50 pm
Location: FINALLY! Moved to a new home in Creve Coeur, IL.
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And, many others since I started riding. Started on a Harley in 1956.

Re: Stainless steel wool for exhaust packing

Postby DJnRF » Mon Apr 27, 2015 9:45 am

FM-USA wrote:Ya, regular Stainless Steel clogs too quick, tried'm.
Below are from almost any "Dollar Store", really cheap.

Scouring-Pads .jpg


I just reshape to fit (NOT to tight) the tailpipe and drilled an angled hole through the tailpipes end and slip a 1/4" x 2 inch long bolt. No nut needed since the pad will hold it in place and keep it from rattling.

I keep a couple baggies handy if I need to change the sound or remove it for that...
RUMBLE




I'll get great laughs from passing HD guys when the pads start to fray (hair) and hang out the tailpipe.
:lol:
.



Hi Stu,

The problem is that those cheap ss pads are made with a very poor grade of steel, and will not
do the job as well as pads designed for high heat, and acids. (a purer grade of steel) One man
here used those 'pot scrubbers' for his machine, and they came apart way too soon. He was so
discouraged over the whole idea after going to all the trouble that he hasn't again tried. Get
the pads designed for exhaust heat and acids to gain a lot more longevity. Also, stuffing them
in the tailpipe seems, to me, to be the best way as the exhaust has had more distance in
which to cool somewhat. The 'fire heat' directly from the engine might tend to cause sooner
failure of the pads when placed before the baffles.

Placement before the baffles seems like a more secure place, and idea, but I question the
logic due to the extra heat at that location. Even the baffles and inner, and outer pipes
rust out in time with their thickness, and strength. I believe I would rather them come
apart after the baffle compartments so that I would not take the chance of the material
causing more harm to them from the debris of old pads passing through, or clogging up.

I used long #10 stainless steel sheet metal screws (2 angled) in my pipes to hold the pads
in place. I can take them out easily to add, or replace pads. They also won't rust away
as quickly as the pads might. I haven't had the pads in my machine for long due to the
winter months, but will be able to check how they have lasted by sitting through this
past season as soon as I finish working on my machine. (I hope it is very soon as I
am eager to get back to riding again.)

Take care,
Dave.
"Survival is one's own ability to cope with and overcome any adverse or threatening situation, condition, casualty or event." ©Dj 1969

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DJnRF
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Joined: Fri Oct 04, 2013 8:50 pm
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And, many others since I started riding. Started on a Harley in 1956.

Re: Stainless steel wool for exhaust packing

Postby DJnRF » Mon Apr 27, 2015 9:58 am

Sorry about that FM-USA. Just a habit of conversation with Stuart.

I had forgot to mention that the SS pads used for exhaust are of a very
course weave. They are designed for the heat, and acids of exhaust, and
to also be as nonrestrictive as is possible with the exhaust.

I know the price is more attractive than the pads developed for this
application, but they are made with a very poor grade of steel. They
do work for scrubbing pots, but not so well in motorcycle exhaust as
compared to the proper pads for the application. Also, the convenience
of running right down to the local dollar store seems better, and faster
than waiting for an order by mail, and that very few places carry the
proper pads for this use.

So far I have only about a month on my pads before winter set in on me.
But, the sitting through the winter, and soon again riding will show me
how well they hold up to the rigor I put my machine through running all
the time on emergency run calls. I was running only six miles at most
on high speed runs, but now will be running sixteen miles for each
emergency call. They are all some very high speed runs. I will get a
very good idea this year of how well the pads work. I intend to change
them around August or September to also see what shape they are
at that time.

Take care,
Dave.
"Survival is one's own ability to cope with and overcome any adverse or threatening situation, condition, casualty or event." ©Dj 1969

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Re: Stainless steel wool for exhaust packing

Postby FM-USA » Mon Apr 27, 2015 10:15 am

DAVE:
The quality of pads you are getting/got must be lower. The ones I have, have lasted 1.5 years now and that through 2 winters.
True the really cheap ones don't last since moisture destroys them. It's also probable folks who use these cheap pads let there bikes sit a lot longer between uses which allows the pads to deteriorate.
I can offer a suggestion which I have not tried yet. Paint the pads with high temp paint after forming and fitting.
.
I will say from experience, "IF" that are packed too tight, more soot is generated and clogs up the pads. I've found a slight packing or rolling is all that's needed for a little back pressure. It's that back pressure that muffles the next incoming sound pulse.
I've also considered packing them IN the chamber somewhere but if anything were to go wrong, it's a tear down to fix. Simply stuffing them up the tailpipe is just too easy to ignore.
If you look at the after market pipes (eg: RatTrap) you'll see the adjustable ones are adjusted at the pipes outlet, just like what I'm doing.
OOPS afterthought:
This past winter I notices the Dollar Stores are fazing out of the better cheap pads that I use so I'm buying whenever I see'm.
Long time ago a bud came to my shop after getting his hemi running, wanted a quick tune-up. I did it but told him with no mufflers he WILL get a ticket. He said got no more money. OK, let me look what I have. 10 minutes later I installed a solution. He liked the sound a lot and asked what I did. I got my extra creeper and showed him, he had a good laugh. I gave him a one-of-a-kind custom muffler. I cut 2 STP carb cleaner cans tops off, punched a fair amount of holes in the middle and screwed'm on. The cans were almost a twist tight fit to begin with.

Back pressure cancellation can. Basic baffling but done externally.
(cough-cough hack-hack)
OH, and come to think of it, he popped more holes in them cans for more noise.... kids!

Last edited by FM-USA on Mon Apr 27, 2015 10:48 am, edited 3 times in total.
"OIL CHANGE?" _FM 07-2009
Know its new taste and be loyal, you'll know when to change that oil.
Taste testing as the miles flow, souring as that acid grows.
And don't flirt with dirt or darkened oil, all the faster your engine will spoil.

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DJnRF
Posts: 351
Joined: Fri Oct 04, 2013 8:50 pm
Location: FINALLY! Moved to a new home in Creve Coeur, IL.
Motorcycle: 1981 GL1100i Interstate
And, many others since I started riding. Started on a Harley in 1956.

Re: Stainless steel wool for exhaust packing

Postby DJnRF » Mon Apr 27, 2015 10:42 am

FM-USA wrote:DAVE:
The quality of pads you are getting/got must be lower. The ones I have, have lasted 1.5 years now and that through 2 winters.
True the really cheap ones don't last since moisture destroys them. It's also probable folks who use these cheap pads let there bikes sit a lot longer between uses which allows the pads to deteriorate.
I can offer a suggestion which I have not tried yet. Paint the pads with high temp paint after forming and fitting.
.
I will say from experience, "IF" that are packed too tight, more soot is generated and clogs up the pads. I've found a slight packing or rolling is all that's needed for a little back pressure. It's that back pressure that muffles the next incoming sound pulse.
I've also considered packing them IN the chamber somewhere but if anything were to go wrong, it's a tear down to fix. Simply stuffing them up the tailpipe is just too easy to ignore.
If you look at the after market pipes (eg: RatTrap) you'll see the adjustable ones are adjusted at the pipes outlet, just like what I'm doing.



Hi FM,

I can't say how well mine will hold up as I have only had them in since last fall. And, that
included the winter months sitting while only be started in the garage about once every
other week. (sometimes weekly)

When packing mine I packed them, only around the outer edge .... not in the middle. They
are open fairly well so as to not cause exhaust restriction for an elevated back pressure.
I have not noticed any difference in performance, or even fuel mileage. Just sound.

Yes, I believe such adjustments to existing pipes should be at the outlet. At the least, I
feel it to be much safer that way than in pipes before the baffles.

I wish I still had a shop to experiment with some pipes. I would like to build a set for
my machine with at least three baffles in the tube, the stainless steel mesh around
the tube (I already have a roll of that.), and a good mat packing around that. The
silencers I have made all did much better with more baffles, and did not add any
amount of restriction to the flow of gasses. I haven't seen where the motorcycle
mufflers use any more than one baffle in the tube. The absorption of gasses, and
thereby, noise, does not make a restrictive flow to add back pressure. It merely
allows for the variable gases and flow to have more 'captured' long enough to
suppress the sound. Maybe when I get my garage settled I can get some of the
equipment I need to try this for my machine. I know I am not more able to do
all the testing and research anywhere near as well as the muffler manufacturers,
but I am not into it seeking ways to save money as they must do for business.

Take care,
Dave.
"Survival is one's own ability to cope with and overcome any adverse or threatening situation, condition, casualty or event." ©Dj 1969

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Contact:

Re: Stainless steel wool for exhaust packing

Postby roadwanderer2 » Mon Apr 27, 2015 10:48 am

Hey guys:

after looking inside the back end of the bike's mufflers, i decided to use the very course type of s/s pad. one person has a link to them from a seller on eBay that im going to get them from since there's no where around here to get them. i was thinking about getting some of those "chore boy" pads, but thy might fall apart to quickly. im going to put them inside the tail sections of the pipes because of what Dave said about them getting too hot from the motor's heat and engine exhaust chemicals. i'll use the s/s screws to hold them in.

FM, i like the s/s pads that you have in the pic you posted, the 4 pack ones look to be the better of them all, but im wondering if the pads that restaurants use for cleaning their grills would work.

stuart.

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iRide 24/365 99% SmileMiles
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"You don't buy yourself a
HD to be SATISFIED,...
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HD friends PACIFIED."
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Re: Stainless steel wool for exhaust packing

Postby FM-USA » Mon Apr 27, 2015 10:54 am

roadwanderer2 wrote:Hey guys: after looking inside the back end of the bike's mufflers, i decided to use the very course type of s/s pad.
...
FM, i like the s/s pads that you have in the pic you posted, the 4 pack ones look to be the better of them all, but im wondering if the pads that restaurants use for cleaning their grills would work.
stuart.

My girls daughter worked in a restaurant and she said they got the same pads I got (4 pack in pix).
I did the testing, you got the end results. Save time and find the 4 pack. BUT if you find better, let us know.

Another remembering from the distant past. A bud had the Honda 350 Scrambler and installed the TT pipes. They were up-sweep straight pipes, no baffling and exited at the back seat. He said he can reach around and make'm loud or soft. All it was, was a welded washer to a through bolt and a spring loaded stop and keep the washer from rattling, it didn't. Can't find a pix.
From memory, that washer closed off about 3/4 the total opening.
.
"OIL CHANGE?" _FM 07-2009
Know its new taste and be loyal, you'll know when to change that oil.
Taste testing as the miles flow, souring as that acid grows.
And don't flirt with dirt or darkened oil, all the faster your engine will spoil.

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================
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Re: Stainless steel wool for exhaust packing

Postby FM-USA » Mon Apr 27, 2015 11:18 am

You could experiment before drilling any holes... found this pix.
Protect with cloth and vise grip it to the tailpipe and drill holes in the washer until sasified.

.

.
Finish it off like this... tho it's more chrome to clean.
.

"OIL CHANGE?" _FM 07-2009
Know its new taste and be loyal, you'll know when to change that oil.
Taste testing as the miles flow, souring as that acid grows.
And don't flirt with dirt or darkened oil, all the faster your engine will spoil.

User avatar
DJnRF
Posts: 351
Joined: Fri Oct 04, 2013 8:50 pm
Location: FINALLY! Moved to a new home in Creve Coeur, IL.
Motorcycle: 1981 GL1100i Interstate
And, many others since I started riding. Started on a Harley in 1956.

Re: Stainless steel wool for exhaust packing

Postby DJnRF » Mon Apr 27, 2015 12:16 pm

roadwanderer2 wrote:Hey guys:

after looking inside the back end of the bike's mufflers, i decided to use the very course type of s/s pad. one person has a link to them from a seller on eBay that im going to get them from since there's no where around here to get them. i was thinking about getting some of those "chore boy" pads, but thy might fall apart to quickly. im going to put them inside the tail sections of the pipes because of what Dave said about them getting too hot from the motor's heat and engine exhaust chemicals. i'll use the s/s screws to hold them in.

FM, i like the s/s pads that you have in the pic you posted, the 4 pack ones look to be the better of them all, but im wondering if the pads that restaurants use for cleaning their grills would work.

stuart.



Hi Stu,

The site on eBay is:
http://stores.ebay.com/SteelWool-biz/43 ... 34.c0.m322

With shipping the cost might be just a very slight bit higher than than what I paid. Of course, it is another year later.
The shipping cost could have gone up a bit. I didn't check that here.

The company, Lustersheen (also Lusterwax) makes all kinds of steel, copper, brass, bronze wools, and rolls.
Each type was designed well for the specific applications. The particular wool pad I used (#434) was designed
for the high heat and chemical applications. Here is what the company stated when I contacted them:

"Made from long lasting corrosion resistant stainless steel Alloy 434. Highly Resistant to Exhaust Acids and
High Vibration, An Excellent Material for Muffler Baffling. Excellent for noise reduction and heat insulation.
Heat Resistance up to to 1500 Fahrenheit."

I had looked into this issue a long while before I found enough info that I felt the best to help the problem.
This was my decision and so far it has done as well as I expected. Being a company dedicated to just all
the types of metal 'wools', I believed they were the best choice over all the personal ideas, opinions, and
less expensive means.

Take care,
Dave.
"Survival is one's own ability to cope with and overcome any adverse or threatening situation, condition, casualty or event." ©Dj 1969

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roadwanderer2
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Location: sweetwater, Tennessee
Motorcycle: 83 GL1100A aspencade, previously owned, 1981 honda GL500i silverwing interstate, 1974 yamaha xs400, 1974 Honda cb450 twin cam, 1983 honda vt30, 1982 honda 700 shadow, 1972 cb750four, and my first bike, a brand new 1982 honda CM400e. and a new to me 1986 GL1200 aspencade SEi
Contact:

Re: Stainless steel wool for exhaust packing

Postby roadwanderer2 » Mon Apr 27, 2015 12:33 pm

yes Dave, this is the same seller i have saved on my "seller's list" and i am going to order a pack of their course s/s pads next month. I've already spent my monthly "allotment" on my bike for this month lol.

do you think 2 pads in each tail pipe would be enough to quiet the bike down without any back pressure problems?

stuart.
Last edited by roadwanderer2 on Mon Apr 27, 2015 12:41 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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roadwanderer2
Posts: 4105
Joined: Thu Aug 08, 2013 4:03 am
Location: sweetwater, Tennessee
Motorcycle: 83 GL1100A aspencade, previously owned, 1981 honda GL500i silverwing interstate, 1974 yamaha xs400, 1974 Honda cb450 twin cam, 1983 honda vt30, 1982 honda 700 shadow, 1972 cb750four, and my first bike, a brand new 1982 honda CM400e. and a new to me 1986 GL1200 aspencade SEi
Contact:

Re: Stainless steel wool for exhaust packing

Postby roadwanderer2 » Mon Apr 27, 2015 12:37 pm

FM-USA wrote:You could experiment before drilling any holes... found this pix.
Protect with cloth and vise grip it to the tailpipe and drill holes in the washer until sasified.

.
Image0 (10).jpg

.
Finish it off like this... tho it's more chrome to clean.
.

q.PNG


FM, those look nice. i don't mind cleaning the chrome, i use very fine steel wool for that.

stuart.

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DJnRF
Posts: 351
Joined: Fri Oct 04, 2013 8:50 pm
Location: FINALLY! Moved to a new home in Creve Coeur, IL.
Motorcycle: 1981 GL1100i Interstate
And, many others since I started riding. Started on a Harley in 1956.

Re: Stainless steel wool for exhaust packing

Postby DJnRF » Mon Apr 27, 2015 12:47 pm

roadwanderer2 wrote:yes Dave, this is the same seller i have saved on my "seller's list" and i am going to order a pack of their course s/s pads next month. I've already spent my monthly "allotment" on my bike for this month lol.

stuart.



Hi Stu,

Me too! lol It is a good thing that the checks will be deposited on this Friday for the month of May.

Just be sure to get the #434 pads, and not the #316L pads that are also stainless steel.

I still have a lot I want to do on my machine. I especially want to work on the fairing, add a new
radio system as soon as I select something I can find, mount some new emergency lights, make
some repairs to some bent mounts, and some cracks, and new paint for it. (If I can afford to get
the paint this month.)

A new battery, work on the alternator mounting, a new tire for the rear, and work or replacement
of rear shocks or air stuff that it needs. Of course, oil, and coolant change plus grease and clutch
adjustment. I will also check the brakes, but they seemed to be OK. All-in-all, a good hours work
... plus a few more hours. lol

TC,
Dave.
"Survival is one's own ability to cope with and overcome any adverse or threatening situation, condition, casualty or event." ©Dj 1969

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roadwanderer2
Posts: 4105
Joined: Thu Aug 08, 2013 4:03 am
Location: sweetwater, Tennessee
Motorcycle: 83 GL1100A aspencade, previously owned, 1981 honda GL500i silverwing interstate, 1974 yamaha xs400, 1974 Honda cb450 twin cam, 1983 honda vt30, 1982 honda 700 shadow, 1972 cb750four, and my first bike, a brand new 1982 honda CM400e. and a new to me 1986 GL1200 aspencade SEi
Contact:

Re: Stainless steel wool for exhaust packing

Postby roadwanderer2 » Mon Apr 27, 2015 1:27 pm

Hey Dave:

i have the #434 pads saved on my eBay "watch list" so i remember to get the correct ones. I too have done/doing a lot of major maintenance to my bike as well. replacing the stator, new clutch, checking the valve adjustments, fresh oil and filter, fresh antifreeze, already repainted and restriped the entire bike, and my trailer to match, putting on 2 new tires. all this has to be done before i take another ride down to Florida in June. this time im being smart, im replacing BOTH tires before i go, this way i don't have to worry about needing to change one or both of them when i get down there like i had to do last year. seems that im replacing tires on this bike every year. the rear tire is already worn down. guess im doing a lot of riding. glad i have my new motorcycle lift and tire bead breaker. should make it a lot easer this time around.

you didn't answer my last question...do you think 2 pads in each tail pipe should be enough to quiet the bike down without any back pressure problems?

stuart.

User avatar
DJnRF
Posts: 351
Joined: Fri Oct 04, 2013 8:50 pm
Location: FINALLY! Moved to a new home in Creve Coeur, IL.
Motorcycle: 1981 GL1100i Interstate
And, many others since I started riding. Started on a Harley in 1956.

Re: Stainless steel wool for exhaust packing

Postby DJnRF » Mon Apr 27, 2015 5:11 pm

roadwanderer2 wrote:you didn't answer my last question...do you think 2 pads in each tail pipe should be enough to quiet the bike down without any back pressure problems?

stuart.



Hi Stu,

In an earlier post I had written this:
"Quieting all depends upon how many pads you use, and how quiet you want it to become.
I cut down fairly with just one, but two might work best."

Personally, I would try just one pad first to see how it does for a while. If after some rides
you think you might want more you could add another. I don't think that there would be much
back pressure with one, or two, but I haven't yet tried two. With the size of motorcycle engines
being so small as compared to auto engines, and due to the very short length of the exhaust
system, you can't expect to quiet it as much as you can a car. I would dearly love to have
mine to make no more noise than an electric motorcycle. The only noise you might hear
from one of those is a slight whine when they accelerate. I would love that kind of quiet. lol

TC,
Dave.
"Survival is one's own ability to cope with and overcome any adverse or threatening situation, condition, casualty or event." ©Dj 1969

User avatar
roadwanderer2
Posts: 4105
Joined: Thu Aug 08, 2013 4:03 am
Location: sweetwater, Tennessee
Motorcycle: 83 GL1100A aspencade, previously owned, 1981 honda GL500i silverwing interstate, 1974 yamaha xs400, 1974 Honda cb450 twin cam, 1983 honda vt30, 1982 honda 700 shadow, 1972 cb750four, and my first bike, a brand new 1982 honda CM400e. and a new to me 1986 GL1200 aspencade SEi
Contact:

Re: Stainless steel wool for exhaust packing

Postby roadwanderer2 » Mon Apr 27, 2015 5:26 pm

Hey Dave:

I've heard those electric bikes run on YouTube and they are very quiet. what im looking for is to be able to hear the engine sound more than the exhaust noise, hear my stereo without having to blast it while im running at 60mph and not having to turn it down when i stop at a red light so its not annoying other motorists. do you think 2 pads per pipe would do the trick? i already hear the whining sound from the bikes engine when i go up thru the gears. almost sounds like i have a turbo charger stuffed in it when im going up thru 2nd, 3rd and 4th gears. THAT sound i like. sounds like a Goldwing on steroids especially when i throttle up hard. as old as this bike is, even with a 100K on it, its got a tremendous amount of acceleration. i actually have to hang on tight to the handlebars so i don't get pushed back from the G forces lol.

stuart.

User avatar
DJnRF
Posts: 351
Joined: Fri Oct 04, 2013 8:50 pm
Location: FINALLY! Moved to a new home in Creve Coeur, IL.
Motorcycle: 1981 GL1100i Interstate
And, many others since I started riding. Started on a Harley in 1956.

Re: Stainless steel wool for exhaust packing

Postby DJnRF » Mon Apr 27, 2015 7:11 pm

roadwanderer2 wrote:Hey Dave:

I've heard those electric bikes run on YouTube and they are very quiet. what im looking for is to be able to hear the engine sound more than the exhaust noise, hear my stereo without having to blast it while im running at 60mph and not having to turn it down when i stop at a red light so its not annoying other motorists. do you think 2 pads per pipe would do the trick? i already hear the whining sound from the bikes engine when i go up thru the gears. almost sounds like i have a turbo charger stuffed in it when im going up thru 2nd, 3rd and 4th gears. THAT sound i like. sounds like a Goldwing on steroids especially when i throttle up hard. as old as this bike is, even with a 100K on it, its got a tremendous amount of acceleration. i actually have to hang on tight to the handlebars so i don't get pushed back from the G forces lol.

stuart.



Hi Stu,

As quiet as I believe you are explaining, I think one pad would be fine, and that two wouldn't
add any more quiet to it.

I know what you mean about hearing the radio. I love to have mine on a country station around
here, but no matter how quiet the machine I still have to have loud volume. My hearing loss
demands it for me. Even at an idle it is difficult for me to hear to be able to understand what
is being played on the radio. With any other noise such as wind, road, other vehicles, other
loud exhaust, and even my own machine sounds I have a lot of trouble hearing without a lot
of volume. My wife says that I make sure that everyone around can hear what I am watching
on TV.

The great part for me is that my hearing loss if from gunfire. That means that my hearing
has been damaged on the high side frequencies. My loss begins at 2500 cps (Hz), and goes
up all the way to 8000 cps. But, I hear extremely well below 2500 cps, and better than a
newborn's new system below 300 cps. I can even hear the subaudible tones from about
30 db and up. That has sure been a great benefit when tuning a 2-way radio transmitter as
I could hear the variations well enough to get a radio aligned within tolerance by ear. I do
have a $22k analyzer for the task, but I seldom have to use it just to put a radio on the
proper frequency within the +/- 2,5 khz above or below the primary.

Having my type of hearing loss has an added benefit, too. Women and children's voice
frequencies are normally from 3000 to 4500 cps. My best hearing at 2500 cps is a loudness
of 110 db for me to hear it. And, better yet is that high pitched 'screaming' doesn't help
me to hear any better. It is still too high a frequency for me to hear even though it
might be shouted at 110 db. The way the doctor put it to my wife is; "Your husband is
legally deaf to women and kids." Her reply was, "How convenient." lol

I wish I could find a couple of the old Motorola Power Voice speakers. Those 4 ohm,
amplified speakers were perfect for me to hear with. They were used with some mobile
radios for an officer away from his car, or in noisy area situations. Many fire trucks
also used these. I have a schematic on them, but I would have to make the inside
mounting plate to build the circuit upon, and that would mean I would also need
the older Motorola speaker housings to install it. Most others of the time were not
large enough, or shaped right. Heck, I wish I could find six of them to use in every
vehicle, in the garage, and on certain equipment in the house. That would be a
minimum of six.

I do have one old Motorola speaker in my truck on the all counties area frequencies
so I have a better chance of hearing what I need to hear. I may not have a duty to
respond outside of my 50 sq mile area, but if close to help it is expected on any
police, fire, or medical call. That speaker is not a Power Voice one, but is better
than any other radio speaker I have found. (those old ones are even much more
long lasting, and durable, and inexpensive to repair)

Oh well.
TC,
Dave.
"Survival is one's own ability to cope with and overcome any adverse or threatening situation, condition, casualty or event." ©Dj 1969

User avatar
FM-USA
Posts: 1992
Joined: Wed May 18, 2011 8:40 am
Location: USA-ILL-60085
Motorcycle: .
'91 GL1500-I (Dbl-Darkside)
Acquired:__51K_Jun_??/2007
MADE_IT!_200K_Oct_17/2016
iRide 24/365 99% SmileMiles
================
"You don't buy yourself a
HD to be SATISFIED,...
you buy it to keep your
HD friends PACIFIED."
================
|
ANTAGONISTS need not post.
|
==================

Re: Stainless steel wool for exhaust packing

Postby FM-USA » Mon Apr 27, 2015 7:34 pm

JUST
. . . doodling . . .




"OIL CHANGE?" _FM 07-2009
Know its new taste and be loyal, you'll know when to change that oil.
Taste testing as the miles flow, souring as that acid grows.
And don't flirt with dirt or darkened oil, all the faster your engine will spoil.


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