Electricity 101 Part 5: Soldering Techniques


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Electricity 101 Part 5: Soldering Techniques

Postby WingAdmin » Mon Nov 03, 2014 10:50 pm



When talking about soldering, it's far easier to demonstrate the technique I use than to attempt to describe it. So here is my demonstration:






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Re: Electricity 101 Part 5: Soldering Techniques

Postby charliektm400exc » Tue Nov 04, 2014 8:00 pm

Great video. I've been soldering for 40 years, but nobody ever taught me properly so I was self taught, and you've given me some answers to problems I've had. I will be able to do a much better job now.

As for soldering on the road, I just cary a handful of posilocks and I think that's a better option then trying to use a butane flame, but each to his own.

Charlie

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Re: Electricity 101 Part 5: Soldering Techniques

Postby gwbldad » Mon Dec 01, 2014 11:28 am

Great video, great technique.
I have found that letting the newly soldered joint cool before moving it greatly reduces the possibility of mechanical failure, too.

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Re: Electricity 101 Part 5: Soldering Techniques

Postby WingAdmin » Mon Dec 01, 2014 11:46 am

gwbldad wrote:Great video, great technique.
I have found that letting the newly soldered joint cool before moving it greatly reduces the possibility of mechanical failure, too.


Absolutely, I should have mentioned that. Moving a solder joint before it has solidified can cause a cold solder joint, which not only can fail mechanically, but does not seal properly against oxidation, so it can fail electrically as well. A good solder joint will be shiny and smooth. A cold solder joint will be dull and/or rough:


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Re: Electricity 101 Part 5: Soldering Techniques

Postby barnaclebill » Tue Dec 02, 2014 1:14 am

Thanks for that teach-in! Like most people my knowledge of soldering is pretty basic, going back many (many) years! One thing I have found, is that when soldering fine multi-wired cable that when applying the heat the wire frays out. Is this caused by over heating, or just my bad technique?

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Re: Electricity 101 Part 5: Soldering Techniques

Postby WingAdmin » Tue Dec 02, 2014 12:42 pm

barnaclebill wrote:Thanks for that teach-in! Like most people my knowledge of soldering is pretty basic, going back many (many) years! One thing I have found, is that when soldering fine multi-wired cable that when applying the heat the wire frays out. Is this caused by over heating, or just my bad technique?


Heat will cause wire to expand, which can cause stranded wire to fray. That's one of the reasons you want to twist the stranded ends tightly together (both the individual ends, and then the two wires together), to prevent fraying/movement during heating, and to enhance the strength of the wire and of the mechanical bond.

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Re: Electricity 101 Part 5: Soldering Techniques

Postby rachester67 » Tue Dec 02, 2014 3:21 pm

What did we do before Youtube? You find just about everything I think.

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Re: Electricity 101 Part 5: Soldering Techniques

Postby craigtech » Sun Jan 04, 2015 9:03 pm

Well done.
I've found electrical and soldering one of the hardest things to teach apprentices - some of their bad soldering habits are nearly impossible to erase and they find it very hard to do it correctly. (I'm an electronics engineer as well as mechanic, so I guess I have the luxury of that extra training).
As an add on to WindAdmin's video... do not crank up the iron so it is too hot, also do not use a large wattage iron to try to solder. Obviously if the iron is too cold, the solder simply won't melt properly, but if it is too hot you will change the composition of the solder and will end up with a "dry joint". Look at the colour of the solder on the tip of the iron after 2 seconds- if it is golden, it is way too hot.
Normal 60/40 (lead/tin) solder melts at less than 200degC (392F) - a good temperature controlled iron with good recovery characteristics should not have to be set higher than 300C.
The other reason not to bake your solder is the rosin inside your solder - its job is to clean as well as protect and alleviate oxidation of the solder alloy. If your iron is too hot - it stops doing its job and that degrades your solder joint as well... now you know a couple more reasons why soldering is so hard to do right.

Another "timbit" for you blokes doing your own repairs -- When joining wires in cars and bikes, etc, (exactly like WingAdmin just showed you in his video) always cover the wire with good quality heatshrink tube and extend it for at least 20mm each side of your joint. The reason for this is not only the obvious insulation, but also mechanical. Vehicles vibrate and your wire WILL break immediately where your solder finishes... then you'll have to do it all again. This is why you will never find a soldered wire in any vehicle from manufacture without some pretty heavy sleeving on it... and never in a connector.

Cheers from Queensland
Craig




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