2016 Cleveland Motorcycle Show Report


Reports and stories from trips, planning of gatherings, questions about how to get there!
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2016 Cleveland Motorcycle Show Report

Postby WingAdmin » Sun Jan 31, 2016 3:40 pm



I went to the Cleveland Motorcycle Show yesterday. As always, I took a lot of pictures, primarily of bikes that could be considered competitors to the Goldwing.

My overall impression of the show: it was considerably smaller than last year. There were nowhere near as many vendors - probably half as many as last year. Last year there were so many vendors that it took hours to go through all of them. This year I managed to see all of the vendors pretty much in about 90 minutes. There were considerably less "mom and pop" or one-man type vendors. Notably absent were Kuryakin, who had quite a large display last year, Battery Tender, and J&M, all who also had large booths last year.

Show Floor Layout
Show Floor Layout


Last year's show had quite a few vendors with huge booths containing riding gear - jackets, pants, boots and so on. This year there were two, and both of them were quite small. This is not including about five booths this year selling Harley-type black leather gear, all of which were focused on fashion, not protection.

Most of the manufacturers had a much smaller presence this year. Honda's booth was nowhere near as large as last year, and several notable bikes (i.e. the NM-4 Vultus) were completely absent. Some of the Honda bikes shown were last year's models.

The exceptions were BMW, which had quite a good display with a few new bikes, and Harley, which had what seemd like a huge display with variations on every type of Harley available. I would have to say that Harley totally dominated this show, in terms of bikes, gear, fashion, everything - not surprising, being that in Cleveland, easily 75% of the bikes you see on the road are Harleys.

Completely absent from the show this year were:

- Triumph
- Moto Guzzi
- Aprilia
- Polaris

So on with the pictures...click on any picture to see the larger version.

The weather was amazing - it was 56F (13C) and sunny, and as a result there were quite a few motorcycles in the parking lot. This is a first, the weather in Cleveland at the end of January is normally sub-zero, with ice and snow and salt everywhere. We've hardly had any snow at all this year and we've had quite a few extremely, unseasonably warm days, and as a result quite a few people in the area never put their bikes away for the winter.
FJR in parking lot
FJR in parking lot


Can-Am

Can-Am is taking square aim at the Goldwing market with its Spyder RT and RTS models. Lots of gadgets, long-distance riding seats, heated grips and seats, audio systems.
Spyder RT from the side
Spyder RT from the side

Spyder RT from the front
Spyder RT from the front

Sypder RT cockpit
Sypder RT cockpit


Most manufacturers tell you that you should not install a hitch on their bikes. Can-Am offers one as an OEM option, along with a trailer matched to the bike.
Spyder RT with OEM hitch
Spyder RT with OEM hitch


The top-of-the-line RTS model has every option. Heated seats and grips, adjustable suspension, electrically adjustable windshield, reverse, ECO mode (for higher mileage), digital dash, radio with phone integration, GPS navigation, driver seatback, adjustable handlebars. It's also quite long, just a massive machine. Comfort for both driver and passenger is excellent.
Spyder RTS from the side
Spyder RTS from the side

Spyder RTS cockpit
Spyder RTS cockpit

Spyder RTS seatback with armrests
Spyder RTS seatback with armrests


Storage is also quite good, with a trunk in front big enough to hold a helmet, and saddlebags and a trunk in back. It has a total of 41 gallons of storage!
Spyder RTS front trunk open
Spyder RTS front trunk open

Spyder RTS rear storage open
Spyder RTS rear storage open


The saddlebags are reasonably deep, and slightly larger than the saddlebags on a GL1800, not quite as large as the GL1500.
Spyder RTS side bag
Spyder RTS side bag


The trunk is simply massive. It's hard to tell here, but it is extremely deep. It also includes a 12 volt charger port as well as a USB charger port.
Spyder RTS trunk
Spyder RTS trunk


BMW

The bike that caught my eye at the BMW booth was its Concept 101, spinning slowly on a turntable. Obviously BMW is thinking along the same lines that Honda was thinking when it executed the F6B - a touring/cruiser. I have to say, the lines of the BMW concept bike to me look far better than the somewhat porky front end of the F6B. Like the F6B, obviously not a bike a passenger would want to spend any time on at all.
BMW Concept 101 from the side
BMW Concept 101 from the side

BMW Concept 101 from the rear
BMW Concept 101 from the rear

BMW Concept 101 cockpit
BMW Concept 101 cockpit

BMW Concept 101 side closeup
BMW Concept 101 side closeup


The K1600GT is one of the main contenders to the touring bike crown. Meant to eat up the miles, this bike had some teething problems upon its first release, but they appear to now be worked out. I'm not a fan of the "spin the dial and press the button to select" method of working the functions that BMW uses on its bikes: I much prefer simple buttons and dials that I can operate without having to look down at the dash to see what mode I'm in, or what the setting is. I'm also not crazy about the combination turn signal/horn button - I suspect I'd be hitting the horn accidentally far too often.
BMW K1600GT front
BMW K1600GT front

BMW K1600GT rear
BMW K1600GT rear

BMW K1600GT cockpit
BMW K1600GT cockpit


The GTL, the top of the line BMW touring bike, includes the trunk and passenger backrest. Optional arm rests are available for the passenger.
BMW K1600GTL side
BMW K1600GTL side

BMW K1600GTL cockpit
BMW K1600GTL cockpit


Very noticeable is the low seat height - 29.5", which is close to the GL1800's 29.1" seat height. Making the bike much more accessible to a wide variety of rider sizes, it has optional seat heights of 30.7" and 31.9". This bike is easily the prime contender to the GL1800 touring bike crown. With 160 hp, 129 ft-lb of torque, a six-speed transmission, 51 mpg, electric windshield, and modern electronics that make the GL1800 look like a bike from 15 years ago (oh, wait....), even the similar price makes it a serious competitor to Honda's finest.
BMW K1600GTL 29.5" seat
BMW K1600GTL 29.5" seat

BMW K1600GTL showing low seat
BMW K1600GTL showing low seat


The R1200RT is a sport-touring bike, more like the ST1300, but still certainly in the long-distance touring game. I dislike the position of the mirrors, which give you an excellent view of your elbows when you are sitting on the bike.
BMW R1200RT
BMW R1200RT

BMW R1200RT cockpit
BMW R1200RT cockpit


Indian

The Indian Roadmaster confounds me. The massive front fender and styling says "1940's" yet it has the LED lighting, digital dash, fuel injection and premium fuel requirement that tell you it's a brand new bike. At over 930 lbs, it is truly a monster. While it has (small) saddlebags and a trunk, I suspect you won't see a lot of these $30,000 bikes out on the open road. The styling of this bike to me is horrific - definitely not for me.
Indian Roadmaster from the front
Indian Roadmaster from the front

Indian Roadmaster from the rear
Indian Roadmaster from the rear

Indian Roadmaster cockpit
Indian Roadmaster cockpit

Indian Roadmaster saddlebag
Indian Roadmaster saddlebag


Victory

The Victory Cross Country Tour has the Victory look, without the space-ship styling of the Vision. Remarkably comfortable seats and a nice digital dash make the cockpit a nice place to be, although the radio and cruise controls look like aftermarket add-ons.
Victory Cross Country Tour from the side
Victory Cross Country Tour from the side

Victory Cross Country Tour cockpit
Victory Cross Country Tour cockpit

Victory Cross Country Tour from the rear
Victory Cross Country Tour from the rear


The Vision retains its anachronistic styling consisting of space-age body styling along with V-twin chrome from the 1950's. Taking a lesson from Harley Davidson, this example of the bike layers on no less than fifteen factory options, adding $3500 to the base price, and no functionality - they are all for appearance purposes only. Beveled brake arm, chrome tensioner covers, that sort of thing.
Victory Vision Tour from the side
Victory Vision Tour from the side

Victory Vision Tour cockpit
Victory Vision Tour cockpit

Victory Vision Tour from the rear
Victory Vision Tour from the rear


The dash is nicely laid out, with the audio system screen down below, and a gear indicator up above.
Victory Vision Tour dashboard
Victory Vision Tour dashboard


Polaris

I mentioned that Polaris was absent from the show this year, and they were - however this designer version of a Polaris Slingshot did make an appearance, not a factory supported entry.

Someone spent an awful lot of time and money fabricating custom plastic pieces to make this weird vehicle just a bit weirder. Not much you can do to pretty up that GM Ecotec engine, however.
Polaris Slingshot from the front
Polaris Slingshot from the front

Polaris Slingshot cockpit
Polaris Slingshot cockpit

Polaris Slingshot engine
Polaris Slingshot engine


All I can say about the ridiculous camber on this over-compressed suspension is, what were they thinking? I sure wouldn't want to be the one having to corner hard...or pay for the tire replacement after a couple thousand miles.
Polaris Slingshot wheel camber
Polaris Slingshot wheel camber


Yamaha

Yamaha almost seems like it is giving up on anything non-sportbike related. With only a couple examples of FJR's on the floor, and virtually no examples of their Star cruiser-type bikes, one has to wonder what's going on with them.

The Yamaha FJR1300 is very much like Honda's sport-touring ST1300. With saddlebags added almost as an afterthought, this is a fast, heavy bike meant to eat up the miles. It does have an adjustable windshield however - and an almost completely digital dash, save for an analog tachometer.
Yamaha FJR1300 from the side
Yamaha FJR1300 from the side

Yamaha FJR1300 from the front
Yamaha FJR1300 from the front

Yamaha FJR1300 cockpit
Yamaha FJR1300 cockpit


The V-Star 1300 Deluxe, tucked away by itself was receiving no love from the crowd. This is about as close as Yamaha gets to a touring bike, with decent size saddlebags and a radio, but no passenger seat. The digital display on the dash looks like an afterthought.
Yamaha V-Star 1300 Deluxe from the side
Yamaha V-Star 1300 Deluxe from the side

Yamaha V-Star 1300 Deluxe cockpit
Yamaha V-Star 1300 Deluxe cockpit


The most interesting thing on display at the Yamaha booth was a YZF-R1M racing bike (the race-ready version of its YZF-R1) - sliced in half the long way. Look at the tiny little pistons which consist of little more than a crown and some rings!
Yamaha YZF-R1M cutaway
Yamaha YZF-R1M cutaway

Yamaha YZF-R1M cutaway closeup
Yamaha YZF-R1M cutaway closeup


Kawasaki

The Concours 14 ABS looks pretty much unchanged - although it features something I saw on several bikes this year: the complete absence of a key. The key is an RFID fob that stays in your pocket. When you sit on the bike, you twist the ignition switch, and if it detects the key in your pocket, it starts up. Also notable on this bike are bleed nipples for the master cylinders: Instead of cracking the banjo bolt in order to bleed air out of the master cylinder, they provide a bleed nipple to make the process quicker and less messy.
Kawasaki Concours 14 from the side
Kawasaki Concours 14 from the side

Kawasaki Concours 14 with trunk and tank bag
Kawasaki Concours 14 with trunk and tank bag

Kawasaki Concours 14 cockpit
Kawasaki Concours 14 cockpit


The Vulcan is Kawasaki's version of the Harley. Interestingly, it has crash bars similar to the Goldwing, protecting the fairing and saddlebags - I suspect it would just lay at a 45 degree angle like the Goldwing, rather than falling over on its side. The dashboard looks like a 1950's appliance grafted with an digital dash, with a radio shoved in below it as an afterthought. Look at the tiny buttons on that radio, tucked in down in front of the handlebar clamps - how are you ever going to operate that radio? The saddlebags are so small as to be useless for much more than stuffing a jacket in.
Kawasaki Vulcan 1700 Vaquero from the side
Kawasaki Vulcan 1700 Vaquero from the side

Kawasaki Vulcan 1700 Vaquero cockpit
Kawasaki Vulcan 1700 Vaquero cockpit

Kawasaki Vulcan 1700 Vaquero saddlebag
Kawasaki Vulcan 1700 Vaquero saddlebag


Hyosung

What is Hyosung? I had no idea, but apparently they are a Korean motorcycle manufacturer, and I included them for one reason only: their booth was larger, and had more bikes in it than some of the major manufacturers at this show! They had a couple sport-ish looking bikes (including a 250 beginners bike styled like a sportbike) as well as the standard Harley V-twin clone.

Hyosung ST7
Hyosung ST7

Hyosung GTR
Hyosung GTR

Hyosung banner
Hyosung banner


Harley-Davidson

What can I say about Harley - they just dominated this show. Placed right in the center of the room, with more bikes (and more variation of bikes) than any other manufacturer, more reps, more crowds, more accessories, and from what I could see, more sales going on than anyone else.

Harley even had a bike set up so that you could try it out (well, try the engine) without going outside. Last year they had their all-electric LiveWire motorcycle on this device - a bike which was notably absent this year.
Harley-Davidson test ride
Harley-Davidson test ride


The Street Glide Special looks comfortable for one rider - and a limited amount of baggage. I noted the built-in GPS, and a bunch of small buttons on the dash that look rather hard to manipulate while riding.
Harley-Davidson Street Glide Special from the front
Harley-Davidson Street Glide Special from the front

Harley-Davidson Street Glide Special from the rear
Harley-Davidson Street Glide Special from the rear

Harley-Davidson Street Glide Special cockpit
Harley-Davidson Street Glide Special cockpit


The Road Glide Ultra has the classic two-eyed look from the front of the fairing. When out on the road during long-distance trips, I see more of these Harleys also on long-distance trips than any other. Possibly due to the comfortable passenger seat and ample storage space.
Harley-Davidson Road Glide Ultra from the front
Harley-Davidson Road Glide Ultra from the front

Harley-Davidson Road Glide Ultra from the side
Harley-Davidson Road Glide Ultra from the side


Unique among manufacturers, Harley makes its own factory-built trike. This one is quite diminutive, made for smaller riders. Seated on this trike I felt that I overwhelmed it. I would not want to sit on the rear seat of this trike for more than a few minutes, it's a very uncomfortable place to be.
Harley-Davidson Trike
Harley-Davidson Trike


The Electra Glide Ultra Classic Low (seriously, where do they come up with these terrible names???) was a color of purple I actually liked, with three LED headlights and a $26,000 price tag. Accompanied by the standard universal Harley dashboard, it also has the massive "tour-pak" trunk.
Harley-Davidson Electra Glide Ultra Classic Low from the front
Harley-Davidson Electra Glide Ultra Classic Low from the front

Harley-Davidson Electra Glide Ultra Classic Low from the back
Harley-Davidson Electra Glide Ultra Classic Low from the back

Harley-Davidson Electra Glide Ultra Classic Low cockpit
Harley-Davidson Electra Glide Ultra Classic Low cockpit

Harley-Davidson Electra Glide Ultra Classic Low huge trunk
Harley-Davidson Electra Glide Ultra Classic Low huge trunk


Suzuki

The Suzuki Boulevard is yet another Japanese Harley clone, reasonably executed, not particularly exciting.
Suzuki Boulevard from the side
Suzuki Boulevard from the side


The standout feature on the Boulevard was the massive saddlebags.
Suzuki Boulevard saddlebag closed
Suzuki Boulevard saddlebag closed


Except...when you open them up, they're tiny inside! They're all for show!
Suzuki Boulevard saddlebag open - it's tiny!
Suzuki Boulevard saddlebag open - it's tiny!


Many people are considering the Suzuki Burgman, the "maxi-scooter" as an alternative commuting bike - and some even do long-distance touring on them. They are supremely comfortable, with quite a few conveniences. They are also good for shorter people, who can easily stand on the ground while holding up its considerable weight, by hopping down off the seat.
Suzuki Burgman from the front
Suzuki Burgman from the front

Suzuki Burgman from the back
Suzuki Burgman from the back

Suzuki Burgman cockpit
Suzuki Burgman cockpit


The main benefit of course is the huge trunk under the seat, which holds a full-faced helmet and then some. It took me about five minutes to figure out how to open this trunk!
Suzuki Burgman trunk open
Suzuki Burgman trunk open

Suzuki Burgman huge trunk
Suzuki Burgman huge trunk


Honda

As I mentioned previously, I was somewhat disappointed with Honda's display this year - in particular comparing what they brought out the last couple of years. It seemed this year that Honda had nothing new to show, so they just didn't really bother. The only new thing they were pushing was an "Africa Twin" adventure bike. Jumping on the Adventure Bike bandwagon about ten years too late.

The one thing unique that Honda did was to demonstrate their DCT (dual clutch transmission), used on the NC700X, CTX700, Africa Twin and others. They set up one of their Africa Twins on a dynamometer like Harley, and let riders try shifting (or not) the bike.
Honda's DCT Tryout
Honda's DCT Tryout


The CTX1300 is essentially unchanged, as I could tell. With those mirrors, the bags, the exhaust and fairing hanging out there, I would really feel better if it had a proper crash bar, not just a little stub sticking out in front of the cylinder heads. I still really like the position of the buttons on top of the fairing, making them easily accessible. The optional trunk is of a fair size as well.
Honda CTX1300 from the side
Honda CTX1300 from the side

Honda CTX1300 cockpit
Honda CTX1300 cockpit

Honda CTX1300 trunk
Honda CTX1300 trunk


The F6B looks pretty much the same as last year. It was not getting a lot of attention from people, unfortunately. The main comment I heard about it was "look at all those buttons!"
Honda F6B from the side
Honda F6B from the side

Honda F6B cockpit
Honda F6B cockpit


Surprisingly, it was tough to get a picture of the GL1800 Goldwing. Perhaps it was the snazzy new paint job - and I have to admit, it did look really great. The pictures don't do it justice, in the bright light it was a sparkling silver with a sparkling gold stripe down the length of it. Being that pretty much the only thing Honda has done to the Goldwing for the past few years is add new paint designs, it's nice to see that they're doing a good job of it. When will we see some real improvements on the Goldwing? An electric windshield? An LED headlight? Nobody knows. Honda had only ONE Goldwing at their booth, unlike other manufacturers who had several trim examples of their top-of-the-line bikes.
Honda GL1800 from the rear
Honda GL1800 from the rear

Honda GL1800 from the side
Honda GL1800 from the side

Honda GL1800 cockpit
Honda GL1800 cockpit


The Valkyrie was another bike that was not getting a whole lot of attention from anyone. To me, this iteration of the Valkyrie is rather ugly from the front or the side, with the huge, gaping radiator outlets on the side ruining the lines. It does look quite nice from above however.
Honda Valkyrie from the side
Honda Valkyrie from the side

Honda Valkyrie from above
Honda Valkyrie from above


Why isn't this LED headlight technology on the GL1800?
Honda Valkyrie LED headlight
Honda Valkyrie LED headlight


Hello Honda...? I believe you should be showing your 2016 model year bikes?
Honda Valkyrie - 2015???
Honda Valkyrie - 2015???


The NC700X, which Honda had showed with such pride in years past, with several models showing the different versions available, instead sat alone and forlorn, the only such NC700X there. I did not see a single Honda rep circulating the crowd. Such a shame, as I really like this bike, I think it would make a fantastic commuter bike. It has a huge storage space in the false tank, big enough to fit a full-face helmet.
Honda NC700X from the side
Honda NC700X from the side

Honda NC700X cockpit
Honda NC700X cockpit


The CTX700 also wasn't getting a whole lot of attention. The dual-clutch semi-automatic version of this bike was not shown this year. This is the bike that my wife has really set her sights on.
Honda CTX700 from the side
Honda CTX700 from the side

Honda CTX700 cockpit
Honda CTX700 cockpit


I had to take a picture of the Interceptor. I hold a soft spot in my heart for this bike, being that my first road bike was a 1984 Interceptor. I think the trunk on this bike looks absolutely horrendous. I also sure wouldn't want to have to work on the heads or carbs of this V-4 bike, crammed away inside that massive frame member.
Honda Interceptor from the side
Honda Interceptor from the side


Like the Suzuki Burgman, the Honda Forza would make a great commuter vehicle, and unlike the Burgman, the lines on this maxi-scooter are actually pleasant to look at. With tons of storage and a decent cockpit, this is a fun little runabout/grocery getter.
Honda Forza from the side
Honda Forza from the side

Honda Forza cockpit
Honda Forza cockpit

Honda Forza trunk
Honda Forza trunk


Other Fun Stuff

Of course there were more than just bikes for sale - around the periphery were some interesting exhibits and booths, some of which I captured here.

Artist Makoto Endo was demonstrating his talent painting old bikes. He uses an odd technique, dipping chopsticks into black paint, and then flicking the paint onto the canvas.
Makoto Endo painting one his pieces of artwork
Makoto Endo painting one his pieces of artwork

Makoto Endo painting one his pieces of artwork
Makoto Endo painting one his pieces of artwork

Makoto Endo completed artwork
Makoto Endo completed artwork


This powered Big Wheel with drifting sliders on the rear wheels looks like a ton of fun!
Powered Big Wheel
Powered Big Wheel


John Penton was one of the most influential figures in the development of off-road motorcycle racing in America during the 1960s and ‘70s. An AMA Motorcycle Museum Hall of Fame member and National Champion rider, he is now featured (and was signing copies of) a movie based on his life: Penton: The John Penton Story
WWII Vet and dirt-bike pioneer John Penton
WWII Vet and dirt-bike pioneer John Penton

One of John Penton's bikes
One of John Penton's bikes


As there is every year, a collection of members' classic Japanese bikes is shown from the Vintage Japanese Motorcycle Club - primarily Hondas, as the case was this year.
Vintage Japanese bikes
Vintage Japanese bikes


This 1979 Honda CBX with its inline six-cylinder engine was completely (frame-off) restored in 2015.
1979 Honda CBX - Inline six cylinder
1979 Honda CBX - Inline six cylinder


This 1977 Honda GL1000 has never been restored - it is completely original, with only 6,054 miles on the odometer.
1977 GL1000 Goldwing right side
1977 GL1000 Goldwing right side

1977 GL1000 Goldwing left side
1977 GL1000 Goldwing left side

1977 GL1000 Goldwing shiny engine
1977 GL1000 Goldwing shiny engine

1977 GL1000 Goldwing 6054 original miles
1977 GL1000 Goldwing 6054 original miles


And of course, there needs to be something for the kids to do as well.
Kids bike course
Kids bike course


So that's it, that's the 2016 Cleveland Motorcycle Show. I can't say that I was all that impressed, given the scale and quality of previous years' shows. I did get to try on the new Arai helmet that I'll be buying this year. I found very little else that tempted me to spend my dollars, unfortunately. If I had to come up with a show winner, I would have to say it was BMW. Despite the heavily Harley-Davidson influenced vendors, manufacturer displays and attendees, BMW had a very high quality display with lots of different bikes in different configurations. They had a unique virtual-reality setup for you to sit on their bike and "experience" a ride. BMW seemed to really go out for the show, while other manufacturers just plopped some bikes on the floor and called it good.

Oh, and while Ducati did not have any bikes that come close to competing with the Goldwing (so I didn't feature them here), special mention to them for their, ah, high quality booth attendants, and their tiny, tight black dresses. :)



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Re: 2016 Cleveland Motorcycle Show Report

Postby NVSB4 » Sun Jan 31, 2016 6:43 pm

Thanks for the review and the pictures.
The same show was in Dallas last weekend and I didn't get to go, but really wasn't sure that I wanted to anyway.
I'm the same way, usually running through in a little over an hour and reviewing the exhibitor list, wasn't sure that it would be worth the time, money and hassle.
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Re: 2016 Cleveland Motorcycle Show Report

Postby WingAdmin » Sun Jan 31, 2016 7:09 pm

NVSB4 wrote:Thanks for the review and the pictures.
The same show was in Dallas last weekend and I didn't get to go, but really wasn't sure that I wanted to anyway.
I'm the same way, usually running through in a little over an hour and reviewing the exhibitor list, wasn't sure that it would be worth the time, money and hassle.


Oh I was there for many hours - but the vast majority of my time was spent looking at the bikes. The vendors selling products I got through in about 90 minutes or so.

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Re: 2016 Cleveland Motorcycle Show Report

Postby NVSB4 » Sun Jan 31, 2016 7:24 pm

I guess part of my hesitance was that I'm not really in the market for anything right now.
There are a couple of dealers close that sell multiple lines (one of them carries Aprilia, BMW, Honda, Kawasaki, Moto Guzzi, Suzuki & Victory), so I can see the new models when I walk in there.
Just bought a new helmet and not looking to add another t-shirt, dew rag or anything with HD on it (already have lots of those that I don't wear anymore).

I won a gift card to a Honda dealer a couple of months ago at the GWRRA meeting and can't find anything to spend it on when I go into their store.

I guess I'll keep riding and looking until I find something that I "need" and can get past the wife.
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Re: 2016 Cleveland Motorcycle Show Report

Postby lw1993 » Mon Feb 01, 2016 10:29 am

I was at the show also on Saturday. First time to a motorcycle show. I was disappointed at aftermarket vendors. Hardly any. I go to other shows and there are tons of aftermarket and dealers setup selling items. I looked at many bikes and agree with most of your assessment. Was sure a nice day to get out and enjoy seeing whats out there in the market.

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Re: 2016 Cleveland Motorcycle Show Report

Postby FM-USA » Mon Feb 01, 2016 11:56 am

What struck me the most in all those pix was all the bodywork's hard angular lines.
Understandable can't do a lot with smooth panels, except with graphics.

If there's one good thing with those angular lines is (possible) stability at speed.
Any measurable side wind buffeting begets side push or worse lift since I see more undercutting of said angles.

Anyone know whatever happened with 'Concept Guy' on the other site?
I sent him a PM suggestion about the windshield and side panels then he quit posting. ..... :shock:

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Re: 2016 Cleveland Motorcycle Show Report

Postby Paulcf » Mon Feb 01, 2016 6:42 pm

Interesting report about your local motorcycle show. I don't go to the one here, firstly it's in January when it's -30 here and makes no sense at all, as you expressed re time of year. Also, I see less at the show than at the dealership, so why pay $20 to go (and another $10 for parking and a rip off lunch...).

Gotta hand it to Harley, marketing and diversity and not one to rest on their laurels like Honda. Nothing new from Honda...some paint is probably the cheapest thing they can do on the Goldwing. And you made no mention of the ST1300, but then who cares, it too is equally "long in the tooth", a 2003 vs. a 2016, can you tell the difference? Probably not. And I owned one also.

Meanwhile Can-Am has carved out a niche with their Spyders and in a mere 8 years or so have radially advanced them. For about the same price as a Goldwing, I am awfully tempted for all the benefits it offers AND, I can get my wife to drive it once in a while and I can be a passenger for a change! LOL! Plus a LOT more carrying capacity, etc.

Heck Honda Canada doesn't even offer the ST1300 here (new) anymore, I guess it is slowly dying. Yamaha's FJR gets constant improvements in the meantime.

If I stick with a 2 wheeled motorcycle, it will probably be the BMW R1200RT. Standard ABS brakes, equal luggage capacity, better fuel economy, fantastic fairing and that adjustable windshield and modern electronics, bluetooth and more.

At least I can say I owned & rode the mighty Goldwing in its dying golden years. Sure will make an interesting business case to study in University some day soon!
MOBILIS IN MOBILI

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FM-USA
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Re: 2016 Cleveland Motorcycle Show Report

Postby FM-USA » Mon Feb 01, 2016 7:31 pm

On stage tonight, we have here a little
(Drum roll please)
. . . . . . . . .
pahTING!


"OIL CHANGE?" _FM 07-2009
Know its new taste and be loyal, you'll know when to change that oil.
Taste testing as the miles flow, souring as that acid grows.
And don't flirt with dirt or darkened oil, all the faster your engine will spoil.

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landisr
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Re: 2016 Cleveland Motorcycle Show Report

Postby landisr » Mon Feb 01, 2016 8:49 pm

More kudos for the review and pix. Sounds underwhelming overall, indeed. Hopefully it's just an issue with schedule conflicts or ?? But I am also at the point where I still enjoy my rides, and am not in the market for many do-dads. At some point I will have to look at a replacement for my 94A (180k miles and counting), but I'm in no hurry. I'm fairly confident that I will be looking to downsize somewhat, as wrestling with 900-odd pounds of machine is starting to be a bit of concern for me, and I'm not ready for a third (or fourth) wheel for the foreseeable future. I do watch the market for new options, tho. :lol:

Ride Safe.

Ron in AZ
Beam me up, Scotty. There's no intelligent life down here.

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flogger
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Re: 2016 Cleveland Motorcycle Show Report

Postby flogger » Mon Feb 01, 2016 9:42 pm

The Indy Motorcycle Expo is Feb 19, 20, and 21...
1996 GL1500SE GoldWing
1983 GL650i SilverWing
1981 CB750C Custom
1981 CM400 (project)

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NVSB4
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Re: 2016 Cleveland Motorcycle Show Report

Postby NVSB4 » Mon Feb 01, 2016 9:55 pm

Discussing these shows with a vendor (Endeavor Trikes) on another forum that is going to have a booth at the Minneapolis show this weekend.
He agrees that the shows gotten smaller and says that some of the reasons are that it's expensive and disorganized.
He does some reverse trike conversions that are pretty nice.
It's never too late to have a happy childhood!

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Dave Crook
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Re: 2016 Cleveland Motorcycle Show Report

Postby Dave Crook » Mon Feb 01, 2016 10:08 pm

Very good show review, I agree with all your bike and manufacturer assessments. I was going to make the 200+ mile drive from South Point, OH, to attend the show but decided not to because of the winter drive. Glad I didn't after reading your review, sounds like I could see nearly as many bikes at the Iron Pony in Columbus, OH, which is a lot closer and quite a treat in itself!

My favorite new bikes to hate are the Indians, I think they carry the whole retro thing way too far. Maybe if I had owned a 1940's bike I would want another one just like it (those leather bags don't hold up very well in the wet). And please, don't get me started on the weird Victory spaceship....

For me, my Goldwing is the perfect road bike. Sure, I wish Honda would give her a 6th gear, an adjustable wind shield, and some new electronic gizmos but I can get along without all of that just fine. The most important thing to me is reliability and comfort and even with 74,000 (trouble free) miles, my GL1800 serves me just fine and will for years to come.

The only other road bike I have even considered owning is the big BMW but, I always come back to the Goldwing, Guess I'm just to darn practical. :D

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Re: 2016 Cleveland Motorcycle Show Report

Postby jdtetoit » Tue Feb 02, 2016 8:03 am

Went to the show on Sunday, a buddy and I have been making it a regular day out thing past few years plus its both of ours birthday. It is getting a bit repetitious though so its hard to excited about whats new my highlight was discovering the Honda CTX1300 dont know why but it just grabbed my attention like no others. I dont remember ever seeing that at the previous shows.

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FM-USA
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Joined: Wed May 18, 2011 8:40 am
Location: USA-ILL-60085
Motorcycle: .
'91 GL1500-I (Dbl-Darkside)
Acquired:__51K_Jun_??/2007
MADE_IT!_200K_Oct_17/2016
iRide 24/365 99% SmileMiles
================
"You don't buy yourself a
HD to be SATISFIED,...
you buy it to keep your
HD friends PACIFIED."
================
|
ANTAGONISTS need not post.
|
==================

Re: 2016 Cleveland Motorcycle Show Report

Postby FM-USA » Tue Feb 02, 2016 8:28 am

Did Motus have a booth at the 2016 Cleveland Motorcycle Show?
"OIL CHANGE?" _FM 07-2009
Know its new taste and be loyal, you'll know when to change that oil.
Taste testing as the miles flow, souring as that acid grows.
And don't flirt with dirt or darkened oil, all the faster your engine will spoil.

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Re: 2016 Cleveland Motorcycle Show Report

Postby WingAdmin » Tue Feb 02, 2016 8:47 am

Paulcf wrote:Gotta hand it to Harley, marketing and diversity and not one to rest on their laurels like Honda. Nothing new from Honda...some paint is probably the cheapest thing they can do on the Goldwing. And you made no mention of the ST1300, but then who cares, it too is equally "long in the tooth", a 2003 vs. a 2016, can you tell the difference? Probably not. And I owned one also.


Wow, you know, you're right - I never realized this until you mentioned it. I don't know if I just walked past it, or if they didn't have one there - I'd be surprised if I just walked past it, so unless it was tucked away hidden in a corner somewhere, I suspect they did not even have an ST1300 there this year.

Which wouldn't surprise me - Honda really scaled back and focused primarily on its Africa Twin this year - that's the only thing there for which they really had a full display.

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Motorcycle: 2005 GL1800

Re: 2016 Cleveland Motorcycle Show Report

Postby rhfrantz » Tue Feb 02, 2016 10:02 am

Just a few comments. Motus was not there, but it would have been nice to see them. I did see them at Americade a few years ago and the bike puts out an awesome sound. To bad they are so expensive. Reference the Harley Road Glide (Ultra), The riding position is very comfortable with a relaxed position for those with knee problems and the fixed fairing makes for a light steering bike. Power is good enough with the 103ci engine though more is easily (not necessarily cheaply) available. The new Rushmore edition has fixed the buffeting from the old version. I agree that the Indian Chieftain models are not visually appealing but the Scout is interesting as opposed to the Harley Street M/C. The GL1800 has stayed the same for too long and I agree with your comments but wish there was some way to straighten my legs a bit more. Blackburn Trikes had a small display there with a Roadsmith kit and a Motor Trike IRS display. There may be a Trike in my future as the old knees are complaining.




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