WD40 and handlebar switches


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tom84std
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WD40 and handlebar switches

Postby tom84std » Thu Aug 09, 2012 11:51 pm



In the early '70's I was 16 years old and working at an old family owned Texaco station in my hometown. I changed water pumps, starters and alternators and performed tune-ups. The gasoline I pumped still had lead in it. That's where I was introduced to WD40. I rode japanise and english motorcycles then, and still do. I was at my big sister's place in colorado recovering from a serious motorcycle crash late May early June of this year. They have a pair of Honda Fourtrax four wheelers. The handlebar switches were stiff and non working on them. Long ago I found that these switches would be maintained well by washing them with WD40, working them back and forth and washing them again with a can of WD40 using the tube attached. I've been doing it to my bikes for over thirty years and I've never had a handlebar switch fail yet. It's a good solvent, mild lubricant. Will not gum up. will not attack most painted surfaces. Cleans electrical contacts, and smells good. I spray it into my 40+ year old English and Japanise handlebar switches about twice a year and have yet to have a failure. Wipe off the excess when finished.



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dingdong
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Re: WD40 and handlebar switches

Postby dingdong » Fri Aug 10, 2012 7:35 am

You're right about most everything except the "will not gum up" part. A sideline of my business is repairing clocks. I have literally made thousands of dollars because of WD40. The first thing many owners do when their clock starts running slow is spray it with the stuff. A week later it stops completely and won't run at all. That's when they bring it to me and I have to clean it out of the mechanism and re-lube. I don't buy it but I love it. WD40 is made for displacing water and it does that well.
Tom

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seabee_
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Re: WD40 and handlebar switches

Postby seabee_ » Fri Aug 10, 2012 8:02 am

I've used wd40 to loosen up the gunk in my switches but I always use contact cleaner after to clean things up. You are right that wd40 will collect the dust and grime, that's why I clean them out after. Works every time.
Paul
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tom84std
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Re: WD40 and handlebar switches

Postby tom84std » Fri Aug 10, 2012 1:06 pm

Ok, I stand corrected, but in the case of switches, I tend to spray then several times per year. The excellent solvent property of WD40 I suppose melts whatever is left behind from the previous application. Anyhow for switches it's proven to be excellent to me. I can't comment on clock movements. For protecting handlebar switches I suppose contact cleaner is good but I haven't found one that can solve with the dried and hardened factory grease the way WD does. Spray it once to wet it. Work the switch to agitate. Spray again to rinse. Blow with compressed air. It rejuvenates the old grease and cleans the buildup. Just my experience over thirty years.




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