The slow going GL1000 build


Information and questions on GL1000 Goldwings (1975-1979)
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El Taco
Posts: 101
Joined: Thu Sep 27, 2012 3:06 pm
Location: Alamogordo, New Mexico
Motorcycle: 1977 GL1000

The slow going GL1000 build

Postby El Taco » Wed Oct 03, 2012 4:17 pm



I know y'all love pictures, so I thought I'd put them all in one place. I've had trouble uploading files recently, but I've just discovered that if I resize them to itty bitty, they go through.

Here's my nifty little shop area. This is what the Wing looked like when I started this mess.



Here's my donor, a 1978 with 22K original miles on it.



Here's the first engine, from the '77, out on the jack. It really is super easy to swap engines in these bikes. I had two pulled in one night.



Here's the donor motor, out and ready to go... right up on the bench.



Its home for about two weeks. I'd polish on it in my spare time. The missus did one of the cam covers and totally put my polishing patience to shame.



Here's the frame all done, or nearly so. I did go back and sand a few places. The finish is Krylon, obviously of super high quality.



Here's my rolling chassis, after I polished the lower legs and the rear wheel. I have little patience for polishing as it is, wheels, doubly so. I can tell you to install your wiring harness before you put the tank in, then make sure you have a brake pedal before the engine is in, or you won't have nearly as much room to work in.



Here's the engine back in the frame. I assure you, it's super easy to get one to this point. It's suspended by only a few bolts here, the hardest part for us was getting it from the bench to the jack pedestal. Should you have a small shop crane, consider the difficulty level to be zero or near to it. Of course, I had the bike on the center stand.



Here's a close up of the polished covers. Many hours went into these reflective finishes, and I consider them far from finished, except for what the missus did. Her work thus far needs no improvement.



At this point, I'm about to be on the road for West Texas. I have a '75 over there that's going to come apart and most of it will come here with me. It's sad, that I have to drive all the way back to Odessa just to make what money I need for a month inside of a week. There is little to no work here, with only an occasional job up the slope at Cloudcroft.


Last edited by El Taco on Wed Oct 03, 2012 4:23 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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scotterichmond
Posts: 613
Joined: Fri May 06, 2011 3:49 pm
Location: Marblemount,wa
Motorcycle: 1975 GL1000
[img]http://images.goldwingdocs.com/scotterichmond_32376/Modestly_restored_1975_GL1000_750/engine_repainted_even_new_embl_3919.jpg[/img]

Re: The slow going GL1000 build

Postby scotterichmond » Wed Oct 03, 2012 4:42 pm

I am really liking your project, and watch with great appreciation for the hard work you are sharing.

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thrasherg
Posts: 1837
Joined: Tue Oct 20, 2009 11:21 am
Location: Plano, TX
Motorcycle: 2004 GL1800, 2005 Honda Shadow 750, 2008 Yamaha R6 with RG500 engine, CRF450X, CRF230, CRF250X, XR200, CR500

Re: The slow going GL1000 build

Postby thrasherg » Wed Oct 03, 2012 7:18 pm

I admire your patience (to sand down the frame and polish anything!!) It will look very sweet when you are done.. Thanks for sharing.

Gary

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wjnfirearms
Posts: 397
Joined: Mon Oct 01, 2012 9:51 pm
Location: Portersville, Pennsylvania
Motorcycle: 1977 GL1000
1980 KZ750 LTD
2007 H-D XL1200C
Contact:

Re: The slow going GL1000 build

Postby wjnfirearms » Thu Oct 04, 2012 7:51 am

Most excellent. I've restored a few cars along with an '80 KZ750 LTD which I'm riding now until the GL1000 is roadworthy, which will be shortly, so I understand the time and work that goes into something like this.

It's nice to have a partner in crime, isn't it. My wife has been an amazing help during my restos. She did the complete upholstery on one of the cars and did it very well along with other stuff.

Here's a couple of hints from what I learned over time and through experience for what they are worth. For areas on the bike that you may be painting that might be subject to potential abuse, try either epoxy paint or if you want more hardness, POR-15 or Eastwood Rust Encapsulator. They really stand up well and do amazing things over rusty metal surfaces. This is primarily what both products were designed for, but work equally well over good metal surfaces to give long term protection and a hard, resilient painted surface. For polishing metals or clear plastics, Flitz. Flitz is hard to get anywhere other than their web site, www.flitz.com. They make something called a Flitz Ball which attaches to a drill and polishes the dickens out of anything. It is made of a heavy cloth material and you just throw it in the washer when you are done unlike the Mothers balls which are made of foam and tear easily. I've been able to do amazing polishing using the Ball and saving the elbow grease. This stuff does a remarkable job on clear plastics making them like new, which is important for refinishing windshields. You probably could give the wife a run for her money using this product.

For various restoration supplies and tools, nobody can beat Eastwood (www.eastwood.com). They make things like paints and all kinds of stuff that nobody else makes or sells and are the premier supplier of supplies that auto restorers use. Their quality of everything is second to none. I've used their supplies and was hooked right away. There is a lot they sell that is applicable to MC restoration and upkeep.

I hope something I've learned is of benefit to you and the others here. I know I might have sounded like a commercial, but when I find something that really works, I like to pass it on. I'm never easily impressed by most anything, but these products have proven themselves to me by trial and error and are worth every penny.

Keep up the great work!
Member, Patriot Guard Riders, Blue Knights LEMC, PA VII

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El Taco
Posts: 101
Joined: Thu Sep 27, 2012 3:06 pm
Location: Alamogordo, New Mexico
Motorcycle: 1977 GL1000

Re: The slow going GL1000 build

Postby El Taco » Sat Oct 06, 2012 7:00 pm

Not at all. I was just thinking I could use some Flitz today, being the leader in plastic and acrylic polish. I pulled my old full face helmet out of a cabinet last night and began wondering where I might get some.

I have little experience with paint as far as brands go, but when I shoot it with an HVLP, I run double hardener to produce a tough finish that dries quickly. This one is Krylon, which for four dollars a can, is about the best rattle can finish you can buy locally. I was a little disappointed, as it could have been a lot harder. I've used the satin black on tanks for years, it's the only one that doesn't fade out inside of a year. The desert here is hell on paint.

An interesting product I've used is called rust converter, and could actually be used as the final finish in some instances. Comes in an aresol can, and sprays on after you've removed the loose stuff. A few coats turns the surface black (applies clear) and turns super hard. First application for me was the sickle blades across the front of an antique combine. Left the rusty old shears with a gloss that resembled wrought iron, almost like a hammered finish. Super tough stuff.

As an update, I'm now back in Texas. After looking at my parts bike here, I've determined that I'll be leaving the floor boards and crash bars behind. I'll be using 1100 Interstate pegs instead, the bars are just too hammered, and I have the Interstate case guards, unless I just don't like them on the finished product. It has a tail light bracket that's already drilled for turn signals, which will come off of the '78. I don't know where the ones on the '75 came from but they don't match the ones I have. It has the stepped back handlebar riser with the stylized GW emblem in gold anodizing, that will most certainly be used. I find the tasteful application of GL regalia to be nice. The wiring is still routed in the bars, which are straight and appear to have never been dropped. They will make the trip. The cam covers may polish up better than mine, and if they do, mine will either go to the next project or end up on the market. I'm liable to put lots of polished leftovers on the market after all is said and done.

Do I take the entire engine from the 75? I may very well need the clutch out of it, and the top end could go to hop up the '78 engine some in the future. At this point I'm considering taking what things I need or want, and leaving the rest in good enough condition to tow bar it home on a future trip. In other words, not leaving a bare frame on the ground without wheels or bars. I can't take much, as I'd not like to leave important things exposed to the weather. A week ago, a freak six inch rain came down, I can still see the results of it today.

In Texas, I have to use hot spots to browse, so I'd ought to be off. Thank y'all for the support and approval.

User avatar
wjnfirearms
Posts: 397
Joined: Mon Oct 01, 2012 9:51 pm
Location: Portersville, Pennsylvania
Motorcycle: 1977 GL1000
1980 KZ750 LTD
2007 H-D XL1200C
Contact:

Re: The slow going GL1000 build

Postby wjnfirearms » Sun Oct 07, 2012 8:29 am

With what the Southwest has a rep for doing to paint, this is why anyone doing paint work should consider things like the epoxy paints and others like POR-15 and Eastwood's coating line. We sell spray epoxy paint at Auto Zone and so do many building supply stores. The specialty paints will stand up better to abuse and weather than conventional paints. Krylon has always been a superior paint brand, but it won't stand up to the UV or other weather related things like the specialty coatings will. The best thing is you need no special skills or tools to paint with the specialty stuff. The only major issue with coatings like POR-15 or Eastwood Rust Encapsulator is that you had better make absolutely sure to mask areas that you do not want it to be on and unmask before it dries and wear gloves. Once this coating dries, it's NOT coming off and that includes skin.

I'm real familiar with rust converters. The best ones I've found so far are SEM Rust Seal and Metal Ready from POR-15. The SEM is professional and can be had through automotive body shop suppliers. The Metal Ready is available through any dealer in POR-15 which there are quite a few. I really prefer the Metal Ready for areas of rust damage on chromed things. The Rust Seal is thicker and clings to surfaces very well. SEM also makes something called Rust Mort which is a watery consistency rust converter. It works very well also.

I don't mind spending more for products that really do what they are intended to do. These all do.

Floorboards are in my agenda for my 1000. I found that I really liked them from riding the Harley on the job and my previously owned Shadow that I installed them on. Would you be looking to part with the ones from your donor bike, ET?
Member, Patriot Guard Riders, Blue Knights LEMC, PA VII

User avatar
El Taco
Posts: 101
Joined: Thu Sep 27, 2012 3:06 pm
Location: Alamogordo, New Mexico
Motorcycle: 1977 GL1000

Re: The slow going GL1000 build

Postby El Taco » Tue Oct 09, 2012 8:30 pm

You don't want them, this I can assure you. They're built into the case guards, and it's the guards that kill it. They've been dropped at speed, maybe hit a curb or two, and have generally been mistreated since new, I'm sure. Half the chrome is rusty. Entirely undesireable. You should be able to see them to some extent in the next set of pictures. I might like boards in the future, but these are not the ones.

User avatar
El Taco
Posts: 101
Joined: Thu Sep 27, 2012 3:06 pm
Location: Alamogordo, New Mexico
Motorcycle: 1977 GL1000

Re: The slow going GL1000 build

Postby El Taco » Sat Oct 27, 2012 2:16 pm

I've been lax in my picture posting lately. I've got half of the carb rack done. Kind of hung up on the polishing aspect of the job, but I want it to look awful pretty when it's done. After all of the crusty bikes I've rode over the years, I'd not like this to be one of them.



Made my carb gaskets from cork, which should work just fine until I have to remove them. At that point, I'll have the proper material to reproduce them properly.



Here's where all of my time is going.





Should have the carbs done tonight, but the intakes.... I have no clue. I'm filing off all of the casting marks as I go, and cleaning out all the hard to get to areas takes what seems like forever.

User avatar
El Taco
Posts: 101
Joined: Thu Sep 27, 2012 3:06 pm
Location: Alamogordo, New Mexico
Motorcycle: 1977 GL1000

Re: The slow going GL1000 build

Postby El Taco » Sat Oct 27, 2012 2:19 pm

I forgot to add that the bars are back on with a set back riser.





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