Tips and Tricks


Information and questions on GL1000 Goldwings (1975-1979)
  • Sponsored Links
WingDaddy
Posts: 2
Joined: Wed May 22, 2013 8:32 pm
Location: Hubbard, OH
Motorcycle: 1978 GL1000 Vetter
1985 GL1200 Apspencade

Tips and Tricks

Postby WingDaddy » Wed May 22, 2013 8:40 pm



Good morning everyone, I am posting this to request any tips and tricks that this community has to offer. This profile has been created for my father, who is not terribly computer savvy, in anticipation of his using it after father's day. His four son's (me being the youngest) have banded together to get him his dream bike, a 78 GL 1000 with a Vetter package. The bike is from a friend of the family (in a round about way) and we know it well cared for until it got shelved after 30 years on the road by the previous owner in favor of a new wing. The two of us boys who still live in town are doing a rebuild for safety and road worthiness and then a good clean and polish. The old girl is nearly spotless and has obviously been loved as evidenced by her condition. I have spent the last three days digging around here and have already learned more about the bike than I need but I know that an old dog who has been tinkering with one of these for years will have that one necessary comment that could be the difference between a faithful bike and bad ride ending in high repair cost. So fire away folks, I am all ears and hoping to make this the best father's day he has had in 35 years of celebrating it.



User avatar
virgilmobile
Posts: 7649
Joined: Sun Sep 19, 2010 5:39 pm
Location: Denham Springs,La.
Motorcycle: 1988 GL1500 I
Previously owned
78 GL1000
81 GL1100
82 GL1100 I
83 GL1100 I
83 GL1100 standard
84 GL 1200 I

Re: Tips and Tricks

Postby virgilmobile » Wed May 22, 2013 9:36 pm

If you want the bike to be a dead reliable machine,I do have a few tips

I will make the assumption that someone will fix it up right.
New timing belts
New tires
Check the water pump
Replace ALL the fluids
Complete brake service
Proper service of the carbs/floats and a good sync.
Upgrade to electronic ignition and a electric fuel pump
Be aware of the effects of running ethanol gas.

User avatar
Placerville
Posts: 423
Joined: Tue Mar 09, 2010 12:58 pm
Location: Placerville, CA
Motorcycle: 1976 Naked Yellow

Re: Tips and Tricks

Postby Placerville » Fri May 24, 2013 7:28 pm

Good advice by Virgil. I'll add a few things as well:

- If the fuel pump is original and hasn't been replaced (ask the PO), it's going to fail shortly. Replace it. A factory replacement is available from Honda and works well. An electric pump is also a good choice. The difference is personal preference i.e., 'originality' over 'greater efficiency' because the electric pump will fill dry carb bowls without cranking the starter.
- Clean and lube the throttle, clutch, speedo and tach. cables. These are often taken for granted and often overlooked. They will cause trouble in time if ignored. You'll be surprised at how responsive your carbs will be with a set of silky smooth cables.
- Clean and lube the center-stand pivot.
- When you bleed the brakes, first remove the reservoir cup and make sure there's no gunk in the master cylinder. It builds up in there. Clean the tiny vent (or spooge) hole. It's a little beast that will make your life miserable.
- Use only non-silicate radiator fluid. Peak is good.
- For your forks, use only ATF TYPE F or actual (more expensive) fork fluid. (ATF that is not TYPE F contains friction modifiers that can hasten the wear of your fork seals).
- If the carbs haven't been removed, cleaned and rebuilt in the last 10 years, consider pulling them in the future (next Fathers Day?) and rebuilding them with a Randakk kit or, send them off to Pistol Pete or Mike Nixon for a first class job. These carbs are the heart and soul of these machines. When operating at peak performance, the bike will run like a switch watch.
- Adjust the valves.
- Use Sta-Bil Marine in every tank of fuel. It preserves fuel, addresses Ethanol issues, removes water and has lubricating properties that help your carb slides.
- As stated above, if you don't have electronic ignition, get it and coils as well. Dyna is a very good brand.
Placerville- 1976 Yellow
Image

WingDaddy
Posts: 2
Joined: Wed May 22, 2013 8:32 pm
Location: Hubbard, OH
Motorcycle: 1978 GL1000 Vetter
1985 GL1200 Apspencade

Re: Tips and Tricks

Postby WingDaddy » Sat May 25, 2013 8:03 pm

Thank you guys, like I said you can never overlook the advice of an experienced owner/rider. The carbs have been rebuilt and synced in the last decade, but that is as good a timeline as I can provide. The forks are getting rebuilt due to a leak, by a professional. If she turns over and runs good then the fuel pump and ignition will be addressed around Christmas just to head off any problems, this is something that I would never have thought of. Is there anything specific I should be looking for on the water pump? It is not leaking and nothing seems out of place there. Full fluid swap is already in work (oil came out still amber). I was originally taught to lube the cables with WD40, then informed to use powdered graphite, and have since been told to use silicone lubricant and have never gotten a good answer as to why one is better than the other. Is there anything about the performance that will be a tip off as to whether or not the valves need adjusted, because that is something that I have never done and would like to avoid the cost if possible at this point. The timing belt will be checked and if she looks good then left in place until winter or spring.

User avatar
Placerville
Posts: 423
Joined: Tue Mar 09, 2010 12:58 pm
Location: Placerville, CA
Motorcycle: 1976 Naked Yellow

Re: Tips and Tricks

Postby Placerville » Sat May 25, 2013 10:03 pm

Under the water pump is a weep hole. If you don't have any fluid leaking from it, you're probably OK. However, the best way to check your pump is to remove the cover at the engine-side of the lower hose. When you do that, you'll be looking directly at the pump impeller. If it's made of brown bakelite, it's the original pump and is near the end of it's life. However, to test it, place your thumb on the tip of the impeller and (firmly) try to wiggle the pump head to the left, right, up or down. If you feel any movement, no matter how slight, the bearing is going out and it needs to be replaced. A little clockwise / counter clockwise movement of the head is OK.' If the pump doesn't exhibit any movement, you can put of an inspection for another 6 months to a year.

Clean your cables with WD-40 until the solution runs clear. Then, plain motor oil is fine. Lube your cables at least once a year. If you want, use an actual 'cable lube'. Both will work. Just make sure they're clean and kept lubed. Don't use powdered graphic or spray silicon lube.

Valves that aren't adjusted properly will show up as general poor performance and fuel mileage. A valve adjustment is easy to do. Give it a try.

You can't visually 'check' a timing belt. Weak belts can often look fine. Belts should be changed every 5 years or 25K miles. If you cannot positively verify that the belts have been changed within this period, they should be changed. The farther you push out this period without changing the belts, the more risk you are taking of a catastrophic engine failure should one of them break.


Placerville- 1976 Yellow
Image


Return to “GL1000 Information & Questions”




Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest