1979 GL1000 won't run


Information and questions on GL1000 Goldwings (1975-1979)
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Uther9110
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Joined: Tue Dec 03, 2013 11:24 pm
Location: Umatilla OR
Motorcycle: 1979 GL1000

1979 GL1000 won't run

Postby Uther9110 » Tue Dec 03, 2013 11:35 pm



Hello all! I have just acquired a 1979 gl1000 that had all it's fluids replaced about a year ago and then sat untouched that year. At first it wouldn't turn over, but after new plugs and some pblaster in the cylinders it ran for an hour or so with lots of white smoke (the pblaster burning up?) in this time i ran some b12 chemtool through the intake to clean it which the bike seemed to love as it ran smoother. However I shut it down for a part run, when I returned I discovered that my right throttle linkage was disconnected (unsure when this came to be) after this was remedied she cranks fine but won't run except when I run chemtool through the intake...... Any advice?



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Placerville
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Re: 1979 GL1000 won't run

Postby Placerville » Wed Dec 04, 2013 12:32 am

Welcome from California and to the GWD.

Yes, I have some advice but, you probably won't like it. First, you can't fix carb problems by treating them with liquids. From your post, I'll assume that you have a GL with several issues to be addressed, including the carbs.

My advice is to pull your carbs and rebuild them. Randakk has an excellent kit and video that will give you everything you need to do the job. If you don't feel comfortable doing it yourself, Pistol Pete and Mike Nixon are two of the best 'go to' guys for this type of work. You'll spend in the neighborhood of $450 to have them rebuilt and, I can assure you, they'll be perfect.

After you take care of the carbs, I strongly urge you to determine if your timing belts are less than 5 years old and have no more than 25K on them. If you can't verify that, replace them. Don't 'look' at them to determine if they're OK, you must go by age and mileage. A broken timing belt can look great (except for the broken ends.) If you break a belt on a GL, the engine's toast.
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Uther9110
Posts: 3
Joined: Tue Dec 03, 2013 11:24 pm
Location: Umatilla OR
Motorcycle: 1979 GL1000

Re: 1979 GL1000 won't run

Postby Uther9110 » Wed Dec 04, 2013 1:45 am

I agree and the timing belts are already flying to me as we speak, also included in my purchase of the bike (trade actually) was a "master carb rebuild kit" from randakk. Alas the video was not included in this, so I will most likely be ordering that next, rebuilding the carbs doesn't bother me, I just worried that some of the bikes behavior could indicate more serious faults that would make carb rebuilding a waste of time. Since I don't particularly relish the idea of tearing it apart and rebuilding the carbs then finding out it was wasted effort. So, does anything in the symptoms indicate to you that something more serious is amiss?

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dingdong
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Motorcycle: 1976 gl1000
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Re: 1979 GL1000 won't run

Postby dingdong » Wed Dec 04, 2013 8:21 am

If the bike runs with the addition of a chemical into the intake that means the carbs aren't functioning properly. My guess is that the bike will run with a carb rebuild.
Tom

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Placerville
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Motorcycle: 1976 Naked Yellow

Re: 1979 GL1000 won't run

Postby Placerville » Wed Dec 04, 2013 11:43 am

Uther9110 wrote:SNIP.... "So, does anything in the symptoms indicate to you that something more serious is amiss?"

There's not enough information in your post at this time to determine if anything else is wrong. Because the engine turns over, it's obvious that it's not seized. That's a good thing. One problem that would be a show stopper is a bad compression reading on one or more cylinders. That's something you should determine right now and I'd strongly recommend that you do this prior to sinking any more money into the bike. Poor compression means, at the least, pulling heads, replacing rings and lapping valves. There is a specific method to obtaining a correct pressure reading. If you need guidance on that, please ask, and someone will assist you with the process. It's simple but, must be done correctly.

Other observations: If, while it was running, all of your lighting was working, that would be a good thing. Aside from the carbs and compression, you're next issue is frame integrity. The frame must be rust free and sound. If it's not, it's now a 'parts bike' unless you willing to do a frame swap. Next, are the water and fuel pumps. Both have weep holes underneath them. If there's evidence of leakage there, you'll be replacing both of them. The fuel pump's easy to replace and not too expensive however, a water pump replacement is truly a beast of a job to perform. On the up side, by the time you're done with it, you'll be well acquainted with your coolant system and will have had the opportunity to replace several critical parts associated with it e.g., radiator cleaning and pressure testing, hoses, thermostat, temp. switches etc. After these items are sorted out, you'll be doing a general inspection of several areas that eventually need attention e.g., head and wheel bearings, ALL of your electrical connections (very important), rear drive shaft coupler inspection and lubrication etc.

If you've never had a vintage GL before, I urge you to go here, and read Randakks material on Tech Tips for New Owners. It will get you focused on several issues about these machines.

I know that all of this seems like a lot to digest but, if you tic off each item from the 'show stoppers' and then proceed down the list to the more manageable issues, it's easier than trying to digest it all at once. Once the big stuff is off the plate, you'll be in a much better position to determine if it's a 'keeper' or not.

Good luck with your project and don't be shy about asking a lot of questions. There are a lot of guys on this site with far more experience than I who will be glad to help you.
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Uther9110
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Re: 1979 GL1000 won't run

Postby Uther9110 » Wed Dec 04, 2013 12:41 pm

Upon closer inspection of the areas listed everything looks good, honestly it looks and feels clean, would there be any symptoms if there was low compression? And yes I'd appreciate help in knowing how to test that

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Placerville
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Re: 1979 GL1000 won't run

Postby Placerville » Wed Dec 04, 2013 1:46 pm

Uther9110 wrote:Upon closer inspection of the areas listed everything looks good, honestly it looks and feels clean, would there be any symptoms if there was low compression? And yes I'd appreciate help in knowing how to test that

The first symptoms of bad rings and valves are excessive smoke at start-up and smoke at operating temp. Whether you have that or not, a test is still in order. By the way, parking your GL on it's side stand for extended lengths of time will result in oil migration into the #2 and #4 cylinders (left side) and, upon starting, will result in some smoke. This event has nothing to do with 'bad rings' but, it's often misconstrued as such. Bottom line, always park your bike on its center stand to avoid smokey start-ups and, worse yet, the dreaded 'left turn with the kick stand down' moment. If you've never done it, it can be a significant emotional event.

Rather than have me give my version of the compression check process, I suggest that you refer to the shop manual for your bike for a step-by-step, factory correct method. If you don't have a shop manual, one can be downloaded for free here. I also suggest that you go here to download a large, full color wiring diagram as well.
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RBGERSON
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Re: 1979 GL1000 won't run

Postby RBGERSON » Fri Dec 13, 2013 5:44 pm

AND!!!!! If not said before...I only scanned not read all of the above..clean your gas tank before running any gas to your newly rebuilt carbs.

Several ways to do this..in and off the bike. Do some searches on muractic acid, electrolysis and POR15..that should bring up some old threads..

or here for a summary

http://www.mopedarmy.com/wiki/Removing_ ... a_gas_tank
HAD LOTS OF GOLDWING 75-83
NOW INTO 1500'S..RIDING A 1998 SE

FAIR WINDS,
RB

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Placerville
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Motorcycle: 1976 Naked Yellow

Re: 1979 GL1000 won't run

Postby Placerville » Fri Dec 13, 2013 7:23 pm

[quote="RBGERSON"]SNIP..."clean your gas tank before running any gas to your newly rebuilt carbs. /quote]

Absolutely. Never, ever start your bike with freshly rebuilt carbs unless you've cleaned your fuel tank, changed your filter and fuel lines.

To clean a tank while still in the bike, I highly recommend Evapo-Rust. I've used every method out there to clean tanks and this one impresses me the most. It removes rust through a chemical process that does not impact the metal tank in any way (as will Muriatic acid). You can leave the solution in the tank for as long as you want with no negative effects to the tank. It is orderless, won't harm your skin and has no fumes. It can be reused several times (until it turns dark) and can then be dumped down the drain. Currently, $65 for a 5 gallon container at Sears. Your tank will take more than the 5 gallon container to fill it to the top so, buy 2 extra quarts.

If you're short on funds, I would recommend Citric Acid as an acceptable alternative to Evapo-Rust. Available on Amazon, 2 lbs. for for only $5. Citric Acid will clean your tank as well as Evapo-Rust however, it will take longer and, because it's an acid, it will have a mild effect on the metal of your tank but, nothing on the order of Muriatic acid.

When cleaning your tank, be sure to remove and clean your sending unit separately. (Be very careful when removing the sending units winding cover and do not break the little wires. Also, rebuild your petcock and run a cleaning wire through both the main and reserve tank lines to ensure that they're spotless as well. Top off the job by cleaning your fuel cap (if needed) using the same method as your tank. The fuel sending unit, petcock and fuel cap gaskets are all still available from Honda.


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