Battery charger for GL1000 AND electrolysis


Information and questions on GL1000 Goldwings (1975-1979)
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Lastwachter
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Joined: Sun Apr 06, 2014 9:47 pm
Location: Pennsauken, NJ
Motorcycle: 1978 Honda GoldWing
2000 Buell Blast

Battery charger for GL1000 AND electrolysis

Postby Lastwachter » Wed Apr 09, 2014 10:11 am



Hi guys,
So I have a rusted tank and plan to use electrolysis to remove the rust. I am also in the market for a battery charger for the bike. I would love to kill two birds with one stone here. Can someone recommend a "smart" charger that can do both give me the correct voltage and amps for the electrolysis process as well as work as a trickle charger for the bike while parked? Or at least give me all the parameters I should be looking for in a charger?


Thanks for your help guys. It is greatly appreciated.



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Placerville
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Re: Battery charger for GL1000 AND electrolysis

Postby Placerville » Wed Apr 09, 2014 3:03 pm

No to the smart charger. Old style chargers, the type that would fry your battery if you didn't turn it off in time, is what you need. Find one on eBay or at your local swap meet. They don't make them anymore for obvious reasons. You cannot use a 'smart' charger for cleaning your tank. Don't try, it won't work. If you want a smart charger for your battery, buy one and use it for that purpose.

Regarding your tank cleaning. I highly recommend that you forgo electrolysis. There are other methods that are much easier and less fussy. If you have money to spend, use EvapoRust. It's absolutely the finest rust removing product on the market for rust removal. It evaporates rust without any harm to the metal. It can be left in for days at a time without harm and it's reusable. You will need a 5 gallon container plus a couple of qt. containers to fill your tank to the rim. It will cost you in the area of $100.

If you don't want to spend money, you can do an excellent job with Citric acid. It's the next best method and also highly recommended. Go to Amazon.com and buy it for less than $20. It will clean your tank (slowly) and do a terrific job.

A comment from a fellow user:

"So I went ahead and ordered a 5lb bag from amazon for around $18. I filled up an 18gal plastic container with hot water and stirred about 2 cups citric acid. I think that amount to a concentration of of 0.6%. Some suggest 10% concentration which works faster (might etch your steel if left too long) and you end up having to dump the whole bag and I don't have the space to store 18 gallons of acid.

Anyway with my .6% concentration requires more time so what I did was every 8 hours I would take the tank out and rinse it with a pressure washer, inspect it to see the progress and back in the acid bath till all the rust is gone. Took about two days. And below are the results. I was super pleased as I think I only spent $3 on the supplies I used."


Before


After


Your tank can be cleaned while on your bike. (Pressure washing isn't required.) I strongly urge you to remove your sending unit prior to this process and clean it separately. Reinstall it with a new gasket from Honda. No sealant is needed. Rebuild your petcock and run some heavy wire through your main and reserve lines to free any debris. Tip: You can seal your sending unit hole very effectively with an expanding rubber plug available at all auto parts stores.
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Lastwachter
Posts: 123
Joined: Sun Apr 06, 2014 9:47 pm
Location: Pennsauken, NJ
Motorcycle: 1978 Honda GoldWing
2000 Buell Blast

Re: Battery charger for GL1000 AND electrolysis

Postby Lastwachter » Wed Apr 09, 2014 6:31 pm

Thanks Placerville.

I ordered the citric acid and will give that a shot. I was looking at the Evapo Rust and while the stuff looks great. I just can't get behind buying $100 worth of it. I do plan to pick up a gallon for other odds and ends on the bike.

Thanks again for the advice. I'll be sure to post before and after pics!

Lastwachter
Posts: 123
Joined: Sun Apr 06, 2014 9:47 pm
Location: Pennsauken, NJ
Motorcycle: 1978 Honda GoldWing
2000 Buell Blast

Re: Battery charger for GL1000 AND electrolysis

Postby Lastwachter » Wed Apr 16, 2014 4:27 pm

Well I finally decided to go with the Evaporust. Filled the tank and have a few other items taking a dip as well.
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Lastwachter
Posts: 123
Joined: Sun Apr 06, 2014 9:47 pm
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Motorcycle: 1978 Honda GoldWing
2000 Buell Blast

Re: Battery charger for GL1000 AND electrolysis

Postby Lastwachter » Wed Apr 16, 2014 4:29 pm

Question: It says to wash out with water after use and then fill with fuel to prevent flash rusting.

So my thought is after emptying the Evaporust and I am happy with the results. I would fill the tank up with warm water. Run that out. Should I then try and dry out the tank before adding gas? Heat gun or blow dryer? Or will it be ok with just adding fuel?

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Placerville
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Re: Battery charger for GL1000 AND electrolysis

Postby Placerville » Wed Apr 16, 2014 7:15 pm

First, you're going to be very happy with the ER results. Good that you went in that direction and you'll have it a long time for re-use.

For your question: When you think the ER has done it's job, drain the tank and inspect. If you want better results, put it back in. You can't leave it in too long, it won't hurt metal. When you're satisfied with the results, fill the tank with tap water (warm or cold, it doesn't matter) and drain it. Do this twice. On the final draining, get out as much water as you can. Question: did you remove the sending unit and plug the hole with an expanding plug? If so, after draining, pull the plug and you'll have excellent access to the tanks interior for removing the last of the water. A tip: You can vacuum out the last of the standing water by using a piece of 1/2" tubing taped and sealed to the end of a shop vac hose. Put it down into the tank and pull out the last of the water.

When you're done, DO NOT dry the tank's interior. If you do, you will immediately run the risk of incurring flash rust. Flash rust is just the kind of fine rust that ruins your carbs. Many people feel the need to dry a tank that's been water rinsed but, it's simply not required. The small amount of moisture left in the tank will not harm your fuel system in any way. Fill the tank with fuel, add Marine Sta-Bil if you want to (it removes moisture) and you're good to go.

Question: Are you going to clean your sending unit separately?
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Lastwachter
Posts: 123
Joined: Sun Apr 06, 2014 9:47 pm
Location: Pennsauken, NJ
Motorcycle: 1978 Honda GoldWing
2000 Buell Blast

Re: Battery charger for GL1000 AND electrolysis

Postby Lastwachter » Wed Apr 16, 2014 9:01 pm

Once again thank you for the detailed and quick response. I did remove the sending until, however I am not quite sure why. (I just did what I was told :) ) why is it not a good idea to just leave it in and have the evaporust clean that as well?

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Placerville
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Re: Battery charger for GL1000 AND electrolysis

Postby Placerville » Wed Apr 16, 2014 10:49 pm

Removing the sending unit is good to do for two reasons: One, with it out of the tank, you have much better access to the tanks interior for inspection and water removal. Two, the sending unit should be cleaned separately because you cannot see the units interior without taking it apart.

On the unit, bend back the little tabs that hold the box closed (Photo #1) and remove the cover. This will allow you to view the interior as it's being cleaned to make sure it's free of debris and rust. Soak the entire unit in ER. While it's open, be sure to not disturb the two wires that run from either side of the winding (Photo #2). They can break easily but, can be repaired. The two wires come from the ends of the winding and terminate at the sealed center post (hot lead). (Note in photo #2, the wire on the left is broken.) When everything is clean and in order, put the cover back on the box.

When reinstalling the sending unit, use a genuine Honda gasket. Also, rebuild your petcock or buy a new one from Honda.

When reinstalling your gasket, ensure that the mating surface of the tank is clean, unpainted and smooth. Apply a light film of grease to the tank, both surfaces of the gasket and the mating surface of the sending unit. This will help them bond. Do not use any sealer like PermaTex. Prior to dropping the locking ring in place, lubricate its bottom and the top of the sending unit so the locking ring will turn easily. Engage the locking tabs and get it hand tight. Then, using a large headed screwdriver and a hammer, tap, tap, tap on each tab to turn the ring until it seats. Don't tap on just one tab, rotate around to each one. The arrows should be lined up when the ring is seated correctly.





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