GL 1000 won't start


Information and questions on GL1000 Goldwings (1975-1979)
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Russell Anthes
Posts: 4
Joined: Sun Jul 27, 2014 10:38 pm
Location: Malo, WA
Motorcycle: 1978 GL1000

GL 1000 won't start

Postby Russell Anthes » Sun Jul 27, 2014 11:01 pm



Greetings this is my first post to GW Docs. I've never had any problems with my 1978 GL1000. New gel battery. New electonic ignition. New starter. It was all good yesterday. Today I trailered 160 miles, unloaded and nothing. No idiot lights. I jumped started off my truck and the bike started right up. Voltage meter is low for first time. Fuses under the tank lid are good and I replaced all anyway. Have never been able to find the main fuse mentioned in the manual. Supposed to be by the battery. I'm not good at electricity. Can anyone help with an idea what's causing the problem.



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Placerville
Posts: 423
Joined: Tue Mar 09, 2010 12:58 pm
Location: Placerville, CA
Motorcycle: 1976 Naked Yellow

Re: GL 1000 won't start

Postby Placerville » Mon Jul 28, 2014 1:01 pm

Russell Anthes wrote:Greetings this is my first post to GW Docs. I've never had any problems with my 1978 GL1000. New gel battery. New electonic ignition. New starter. It was all good yesterday. Today I trailered 160 miles, unloaded and nothing. No idiot lights. I jumped started off my truck and the bike started right up. Voltage meter is low for first time. Fuses under the tank lid are good and I replaced all anyway. Have never been able to find the main fuse mentioned in the manual. Supposed to be by the battery. I'm not good at electricity. Can anyone help with an idea what's causing the problem.

If you were able to jump start your bike, your main fuse isn't blown. Your main fuse allows power from the battery to be supplied to the rest of the bike. So, if you jumped the bike at its battery, and it started, then the main fuse isn't blown. Does that make sense to you? Your main fuse is located just to the right of the battery in a small plastic box. It's about 2" long. It's pictured below and it's held in the metal clip in the other photo. Because you've never had that fuse out, I suggest that you locate it and replace it with a new one. It's good practice to change these every so often.

To locate your problem, you must take 'first things first'. Test your battery. Is it fully charged? A fully charged 12 volt battery should measure 12.6 volts. If yours is less than that, you may have a stator problem. Fully charge your battery. Then, take it to an auto parts store that can do a surge test on it. If it passes, you'll know that your battery is functioning properly, will accept a charge and is fully charged. Now you can move on to other possibilities.

Next, check for charging issues. First, thoroughly inspect the 3 pin connector that comes from your stator. Make sure that the pins are clean and show no signs of overheating or corrosion. Next, perform the same inspection on your 8 pin 'stator to rectifier' plug. Pay special attention to the three yellow stator wires that run through this connector. All of the pins must be clean and show no signs of over-heating or corrosion. If you discover that these plugs are burned, you may have discovered the cause of your dead battery. You must either replace the connectors (my choice in order to keep the bike clean and OEM) or, cut them out and hard-wire the wires together (crud but effective). Both of these connectors are located just to the right side of your battery.

However, if you find that the connectors looked good, and your battery was fully charged, then you have a wiring issue. Your next effort would be to check all of your battery connections from the battery to the fuse box. Make sure every connection is clean and tight. Pay special attention to all of your grounds, especially the ground that goes directly from the battery to the engine.

So, by doing the above, you'll be proving that:
1. Your battery is fully charged and can accept and hold a charge.
2. Your stator connectors are allowing voltage to flow to your battery.
3. The wiring from your battery has no faults and is allowing voltage to your bike.

(There's a possibility that your stator is no longer producing voltage but, we can address that in addition postings.)

Do all of the above and then re-post your findings and/or questions.
Attachments
Clip that holds the fuse holder
Clip that holds the fuse holder
Fuse holder.  The dog-bone fuse is inside.
Fuse holder. The dog-bone fuse is inside.
Placerville- 1976 Yellow
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Russell Anthes
Posts: 4
Joined: Sun Jul 27, 2014 10:38 pm
Location: Malo, WA
Motorcycle: 1978 GL1000

Re: GL 1000 won't start

Postby Russell Anthes » Mon Jul 28, 2014 1:54 pm

Greetings Placerville and thanks for taking the time for the very informative information. I’ll save that for future reference. I swapped the battery from my 2003 Nighthawk 750 into the GL and it fired right up. Put the gel in the NH and nada. What I don’t get is why the gel battery reads 100% and 14 amps on the charger and on the voltmeter. Got a lead acid battery for the GL from NAPA and its all good….$140 bucks later. Thanks for the picture of the main fuse, but I still can’t find the main fuse…and my passion is refurbishing vintage Japanese bikes so I’m familiar with most of the components. Previous owner put in an electronic ignition. Could that have eliminated the main fuse? I don’t think so. Any ideas. Thanks again and keep the rubber side down. Russell

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Placerville
Posts: 423
Joined: Tue Mar 09, 2010 12:58 pm
Location: Placerville, CA
Motorcycle: 1976 Naked Yellow

Re: GL 1000 won't start

Postby Placerville » Mon Jul 28, 2014 2:15 pm

Russell Anthes wrote:Greetings Placerville and thanks for taking the time for the very informative information. I’ll save that for future reference. I swapped the battery from my 2003 Nighthawk 750 into the GL and it fired right up. Put the gel in the NH and nada. What I don’t get is why the gel battery reads 100% and 14 amps on the charger and on the voltmeter. Got a lead acid battery for the GL from NAPA and its all good….$140 bucks later. Thanks for the picture of the main fuse, but I still can’t find the main fuse…and my passion is refurbishing vintage Japanese bikes so I’m familiar with most of the components. Previous owner put in an electronic ignition. Could that have eliminated the main fuse? I don’t think so. Any ideas. Thanks again and keep the rubber side down. Russell

Welcome. I guarantee if you took the GL battery in for a surge test it would fail. It's toast. Regarding your fuse holder, it seems that a PO took it out but, probably not in connection with the electronic ignition as there would be no reason to do that. Possibly, it was removed and replaced with a contemporary 'spade' type fuse. Just follow your batteries hot side. You'll find it. A photo of my factory original holder and its correct position is below. Looks like you've got some work to do. ;)
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Placerville- 1976 Yellow
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Russell Anthes
Posts: 4
Joined: Sun Jul 27, 2014 10:38 pm
Location: Malo, WA
Motorcycle: 1978 GL1000

Re: GL 1000 won't start Part Duex

Postby Russell Anthes » Mon Jul 28, 2014 4:17 pm

Greetings again Placerville and thanks for taking the time to help me. You're very patient. I followed your instructions by removing the battery holder and tracing the positive wire. It goes to a part...I don't know what it is. From the attached picture I think you can see I don't have a main fuse on the battery wire or anywhere in between. Also see the diagram from BikeBandit.com. I highlighted the main fuse which is available for sale. Do you agree there's no main fuse on my bike. And what's that strange part. Maybe I don't need a main fuse. Thanks in advance for any assistance you can provide. Russell
Main fuse area on bike
Main fuse area on bike

Main fuse diagram and parts
Main fuse diagram and parts

User avatar
Placerville
Posts: 423
Joined: Tue Mar 09, 2010 12:58 pm
Location: Placerville, CA
Motorcycle: 1976 Naked Yellow

Re: GL 1000 won't start Part Duex

Postby Placerville » Mon Jul 28, 2014 4:48 pm

Russell Anthes wrote:Greetings again Placerville and thanks for taking the time to help me. You're very patient. I followed your instructions by removing the battery holder and tracing the positive wire. It goes to a part...I don't know what it is. From the attached picture I think you can see I don't have a main fuse on the battery wire or anywhere in between. Also see the diagram from BikeBandit.com. I highlighted the main fuse which is available for sale. Do you agree there's no main fuse on my bike. And what's that strange part. Maybe I don't need a main fuse. Thanks in advance for any assistance you can provide. Russell
MainFuse.jpg

mainfuse diagram.jpg


Yes, you certainly need a main fuse. I'm not sure what you mean by, "What's that strange part." In the photo (or fiche), what are you referring to?

From your picture, it appears that your battery lead is wired directly to the stater solenoid and the fuse has been removed. So, you need #14 and several #29's (extras). Also from your photo, I'm not sure if you have a #4 SUB-WIRE ASSY. 'A' still in place. You also need this if you don't have it. It's no longer available from Honda so, you'll have to find one on eBay. I recommend buying parts from http://www.hondabikes.com/fiche_select2.asp?category=Motorcycles&make=Honda&year=1976&fveh=131058 as their prices are always very good.
Last edited by Placerville on Mon Jul 28, 2014 5:20 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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