Gas tank Sealing question


Information and questions on GL1000 Goldwings (1975-1979)
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wieman1304
Posts: 7
Joined: Mon Sep 23, 2013 10:15 am
Location: Webster, Texas
Motorcycle: 1979 GL1000 Goldwing

Gas tank Sealing question

Postby wieman1304 » Wed Aug 20, 2014 9:01 am



Good morning all,
I have a 79' GL1000. I'm cleaning the tank out and was wondering if anyone has had any luck in using a sealer like POR-15 or Red Kote without affecting the in-tank screens? Could I put a little at a time in so it doesn't just flood the bottom of the tank?? How long does it stay liquified before it starts to harden?? will I have time to work with it? I want to do this right, but I don't want to plug my screens up and don't want to have to remove them. Any suggestions??? I thought about taking it to a shop, but not sure where to go. Also, do I really NEED to seal my tank?? there are no pinholes. no leaks.. just a fine powder rust in the fuel bowls. this is the second cleaning I've done since i got it 2 months ago. it had sat up for years. I'm in La Marque, Tx.

All suggestions /help will be appreciated..



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Placerville
Posts: 423
Joined: Tue Mar 09, 2010 12:58 pm
Location: Placerville, CA
Motorcycle: 1976 Naked Yellow

Re: Gas tank Sealing question

Postby Placerville » Wed Aug 20, 2014 3:24 pm

You will receive various opinions to this question so, here's mine.

I have a lot of experience with fuel tanks and sending units. I've repaired and restored many of them and, in my opinion, a fuel tank does not need to be coated. Also, if a tank has pin holes or other damage, coating the interior is not a reasonable fix for that problem. Welding or a new tank would be the solution.

First, you need to clean your tank properly. If the tank is out of the bike, the easiest and most effective way is to take it to a trustworthy radiator shop. They'll do the job right. Have them pay close attention to the main and reserve tubes. The interior screens aren't an issue. If they're rusted out, or damaged, it's not a problem. Frankly, if the radiator shop can remove them (due to damage) it's a good idea just to get rid of them. They're purpose is to prevent large objects from restricting the fuel tubes. If your tank is so rusty that it's breeding objects of that size, you have other issues to contend with.

If your tank is still in the frame (or you just what to save some dough and do the job yourself), I recommend that you use either Citric Acid (very inexpensive one-time use) or, my favorite, Evapo-Rust (pricey, but with multiple-use capabilities). Either of these methods will result in a very clean tank. Note: Evapo-Rust displaces rust through a chemical process. Almost every other method of cleaning uses some form of acid which will remove a small portion of your tanks metal. Buy Citric Acid on Amazon for just a few bucks. Evapo-Rust is available from auto parts outlets. You will need 5 gallons plus two quarts to fill your tank to the brim. You will spend over $100 to do this but, you can use the product over and over again.

After your tank is clean, the best way to keep rust away is to keep it full whenever the bike is parked. Also, use Marine Sta-Bil in every tank. It helps prevent rust by displacing moisture and will also provide lubricity to your carb slides.

A word about your sending unit. You must remove your sending unit and clean it separately from the tank. Rather than go into the reasons why here, go here for more information as to why this is a good practice. A tip: if you choose to do the job yourself, you'll need to plug the sending unit opening so you can fill the tank to the brim with cleaning solution. To accomplish this, use a 1 7/8" - 2" expandable rubber plug available at any hardware or automotive store. They work perfectly and can be used repeatedly. Also, rebuild or replace your petcock and clean your fuel cap (in your tank solution). Both are a critical part of your fuel system.

Once your tank is clean, make sure your fuel lines and filter are in perfect condition. Next, pull your fuel pump top and ensure that there's no goo clogging the valves or ports. Once you've done this, you'll need to address the 'fine powder rust' that you say is in your fuel bowels. That 'fine powder' is deadly and is the stuff that kills carbs. Consider a carb rebuild to be in your near future. If you do the job yourself, go Randakk all the way. If you prefer to have someone else do the job, Mike Nixon or Pistol Pete would be my only choices.
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wieman1304
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Joined: Mon Sep 23, 2013 10:15 am
Location: Webster, Texas
Motorcycle: 1979 GL1000 Goldwing

Re: Gas tank Sealing question

Postby wieman1304 » Wed Aug 20, 2014 4:19 pm

Thank you, Thank you, Thank you. I have been debating coating the tank for about a month now. I really didn't see a NEED for it since I have zero leaks. I've already pulled the tank, and using muriatic acid /water mixture to clean it. It never had a Heavy rust or varnish, but the tubes were clogged. I got the clear with a coat hanger and a lot of patience. It did a good job last time, but I was in a hurry and didn't dry it well or something and it flash rusted on me. I didn't really realize it till I was rebuilding my carbs (using Randakk's).. Now I'm taking my time and doing things the right way. I still might take it to the radiator shop though. I'll try to remember the marine sta-bil... Thanks for your honest and quick reply.

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Placerville
Posts: 423
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Location: Placerville, CA
Motorcycle: 1976 Naked Yellow

Re: Gas tank Sealing question

Postby Placerville » Wed Aug 20, 2014 4:49 pm

You're very welcome.

A word about Muriatic Acid as a cleaner. First, it works great. It's very fast and very thorough. I've used it in the past. The draw back to using it is the fumes and its unfortunate ability to remove more of your tanks interior surface than any other cleaning solution. It should be used full strength for best results and should only be left in a (solid) tank for 30 minutes or less.

Once a tank has been cleaned, owners will often rinse the interior with water (and maybe baking soda) and then dry it with a blow dryer. They do this because they read it somewhere. This is a mistake. Force drying newly cleaned raw steel will cause flash rust which is the wost type of rust you can have in your tank. And, if you really want to create some major flash rust, rinse the tank with Acetone (as some suggest) then force dry it. Using baking soda is unnecessary if you rinse the tank properly. And, it often 'clumps' inside the tank seams leaving residue behind.

After cleaning a tank, the best thing to do is to fill it with fuel immediately. If there's a little water left in the tank e.g., a teaspoon or less, don't worry about it. That amount of water in your fuel won't hurt anything. If you can't fill your tank with fuel immediately after cleaning, simply pour in some ATF or, better yet, some MMO, and slosh it around in the tank until the tanks interior is thoroughly coated then, plug your openings. It can sit like that for several weeks with no problems. If you need to leave it like that for a longer period, leave a cup or so of ATF or MMO in the tank and rotate it every few months. If your tank is in the frame and you can't do the 'slosh around' method, use WD-40. Spray the interior liberally using the cans tube directed through both the fuel cap and sending unit openings then seal the openings.
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RBGERSON
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Motorcycle: 98 SE GL 1500
had every year from 75 to 83

Re: Gas tank Sealing question

Postby RBGERSON » Sun Aug 24, 2014 9:13 am

To answer the question I have used por15 several times if you roll the tank carefully it's fairly easy to coat the tank w/o hitting screens. You have to seal the sensor opening I used old inner tube and the locking ring from the sensor. Less is more use as little as possible I did three tanks with one of the small motorcycle kit cans of por15. I put it in with the tank tilted toward the front and right side..put the gas cap back on and roll it to non petcock side and over on to the top to do the top first. Then I roll it back to the non petcock side and then open the sensor hole so I can look into the tank. So now you have done the top, front and one side just the bottom and back end are left. Again slowly rotate the tank so the bottom getting covered and then the back end. Pooling is BAD..if you see any when you are done rotate the tank and spread it around or try to dump it out the sensor hole. Better to have to add a little more than trying to get extra out. The prep fluid por15 provides stop the flash rust and gives you time to coat it.


HAD LOTS OF GOLDWING 75-83
NOW INTO 1500'S..RIDING A 1998 SE

FAIR WINDS,
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