Concours d'elegance restoration of carburetors tip


Information and questions on GL1000 Goldwings (1975-1979)
  • Sponsored Links
User avatar
pistolpete
Posts: 30
Joined: Sat Jan 09, 2010 11:39 am
Location: Knoxville, TN
Motorcycle: GL1000, GL1100

Concours d'elegance restoration of carburetors tip

Postby pistolpete » Fri Nov 14, 2014 10:47 am



The GL1000 is a spectacular piece of early 70's history and should show very well at any Concours 'dElegance event. However some may not be fully aware of the nuances that are required to make an impression of the judges. On my website, http://www.oldwings.com you will find typical concours rules. If you wish to go to the page it is http://www.oldwings.com/concours.html. If you are looking to place your GL1000 in a show where the judges are experts, You will wish to know about what they will look for and in this post we will look at carburetors for correctness.

The original finish of the carb bodies have a distinctive blue/green opalescence patina. This occurs when they are extracted from the molds during the casting phase.
This patina is only found where the casting material is of a specific zinc/aluminum content. When the casting cools it will take on this specific look. The GL1000 carbs will have it as well of other carburetors of that era. A good judge will look for it and grade on its presence. The vacuum caps may have been polished to emulate the OE finish but there will be a deduction for the "look" of the carb bodies themselves.

The pictures below will show the patina and one that has been media blasted. Typically any sort of blasting will dull or completely obliterate the original finish. Removing this original is finish, while looking great, will in time revert to the dull finish as shown in the picture marked blasted.jpg. The original patina finish is non-retrievable thereafter.

Thanks for looking, questions please post them on this thread.

Pistol and Moose
Attachments
blasted.jpg
blasted.jpg
patina.jpg
patina.jpg



User avatar
rudolphwolven
Posts: 57
Joined: Fri Jun 20, 2014 7:05 am
Location: Netherlands - Utrecht
Motorcycle: 1975 GL1000 K1

Re: Concours d'elegance restoration of carburetors tip

Postby rudolphwolven » Fri Nov 14, 2014 11:45 am

Thanks, very interesting to get this specific insight information.......
As I did, most people will not know these rules......
Regards, Ruud
Proud winner of the NGWClub-USA contest Bike of the Year 2016--Image

User avatar
pistolpete
Posts: 30
Joined: Sat Jan 09, 2010 11:39 am
Location: Knoxville, TN
Motorcycle: GL1000, GL1100

Re: Concours d'elegance restoration of carburetors tip

Postby pistolpete » Fri Nov 14, 2014 11:57 am

rudolphwolven wrote:Thanks, very interesting to get this specific insight information.......
As I did, most people will not know these rules......
Regards, Ruud


Yes, we are aware of these standards as they apply to originality of the GL's.
After looking at member rides, I am convinced that there are splendid candidates out there.
The good thing about a Concours event is the judges are schooled on originality and not glitter.
Most non concours shows are won based on less stringent judging criteria and some times it is just what "looks" pretty.

Maybe some time GWdocs can actually have a concours event to help folks who would like to restore or already have a true original unit suitable for showing.
I would be glad to help.

With enough interest on this thread I can post other details for all who would like to have this info.

Pistol and Moose

Old Fogey
Posts: 724
Joined: Fri Oct 30, 2009 2:09 am
Location: Glasgow Scotland
Motorcycle: 1976 GL1000
1979 GL1000
Contact:

Re: Concours d'elegance restoration of carburetors tip

Postby Old Fogey » Tue Nov 18, 2014 7:51 pm

Pete, when I was serving my time back in the 60s as an engineer, with an American company called Veeder-Root that made the mechanical computers for gas pumps (you'll all remember the printed wheels that clicked round, before the advent of LEDs), the frames for said computers were made of this same type of alloy material, that you guys called Zamak and we called Mazak.
Like you say, the bare finish did have that iridescent look to it.

But, if any of you have had autos with trim pieces made from this stuff, you will know what can happen.
The corner sections of my 79 El Camino pick-up bed were typical. Although they were chromed, eventually the zinc component oxidized due to moisture getting through the surface finish and the corners fairly quickly after that more or less disappeared.

This obviously could not be allowed on a fairly expensive unit built into pumps. The solution was to clear chromate the frames, which is almost an anodizing process. This process did little to change the original appearance.

Why am I mentioning this? Well, the 75-79 carbs are now over 30 years old, but you don't see the same white furry oxidization on them that I think you would see if they were simply left in their bare state. The outsides might get grubby, stained and marked but they don't deteriorate in any other way. So it's my belief that the bodies originally had the same chromating process done to them.

Most chromate finishes you see are normally the yellowish or olive drab versions; dangerous to use these as the Cr+6 ions in it are known carcinogens, but the clear version has virtually none of these. However, safer or not, I don't know of any company supplying these chemicals for home use.

Edit: the GL1100 carbs are a much better material, more aluminium and less zinc.
Image Image

'Impossible' is just a level of difficulty! The only stupid question is the one you didn't ask first!

User avatar
pistolpete
Posts: 30
Joined: Sat Jan 09, 2010 11:39 am
Location: Knoxville, TN
Motorcycle: GL1000, GL1100

Re: Concours d'elegance restoration of carburetors tip

Postby pistolpete » Tue Nov 18, 2014 9:02 pm

John
Much like you, we have seen hundreds of GL1000 carb sets. A good number of these still have this original OE finish so your theory is very likely. A far greater number are not simply stained but the entire finish or lack there of no longer exists.
This may be caused by harsh cleaning processes or perhaps media blasting. This type of "cleaning" will render the OE finish unrecoverable.

This said and both of us hoping for the preservation of as many early GL's as possible, maybe both of us together can offer additional insights on ways to do this.




Return to “GL1000 Information & Questions”




Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest