ignition timing...


Information and questions on GL1000 Goldwings (1975-1979)
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unkle buckie
Posts: 22
Joined: Fri Jul 25, 2014 12:36 am
Location: Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
Motorcycle: 1979 GL 1000

ignition timing...

Post by unkle buckie » Sun Jun 18, 2017 6:58 pm



i'm the proud owner of a '79 gl1000 (naked) and i've attempted various redemption procedures on the beast with varying degrees of success. today i attempted ignition timing, having read posts on 'split difference' setting etc and here's how that went...
mistake number 1, when disconnecting the wires, don't unscrew the little nut completely off. luckily i was also replacing the points, as the reassembly of that little set up requires skill, dexterity, and the possession of tiny little fingers
mistake number 2, came after i discovered the left base plate screw wouldn't budge. at all. not with the philips its designed for, or with a flat-head screw driver... so i used a mastercraft 'grabit' akin to an e z out, and now i'm left with a screw that still won't budge, but now has virtually no head on it.
mistake no. 2
mistake no. 2
mistake 1, i can live with. i'll notch it up to experience, but how to resolve mistake 2? drill it out and rethread? try and dremel slots into whats left of the screw head so it can be turned with a flat head screw driver?

i'm sure someone's been here before. any advice would be much appreciated.



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badandy
Posts: 45
Joined: Tue Nov 01, 2016 7:03 pm
Location: Weirton, West Virginia
Motorcycle: 1977 GL1000 Goldwing
1982 GL500I
1983 VT500 Shadow

Re: ignition timing...

Post by badandy » Mon Jun 19, 2017 8:29 am

On these old bikes that have not been wrenched on for a while some of the screws can be difficult to break lose. They are steel threads in aluminum holes. You get a little galvanic corrosion there. I will take a small flat punch and hit the edge of the screw a couple of times to "shock" the threads and break them lose. If you bugger up the screwdriver slot just tap the screwdriver end into the screw to straighten them up. For really stubborn screws a small impact driver does the trick if you can get a straight shot at them after the punch trick.

In your case I would try hitting what is left of the screw with the flat punch and try grabbing it with vise grips or tapping the edge with a small flat chisel to get it out.

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BlueThunder
Posts: 48
Joined: Sat Dec 05, 2009 3:27 pm
Location: Long Island, NY
Motorcycle: 2014 CTX1300 (BlackThunder aka Predator)
1977 GL1000 (Ox)
1980 CB750F (BlueThunder)
1982 CB900F (in pieces)
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Re: ignition timing...

Post by BlueThunder » Mon Jun 19, 2017 9:35 am

badandy wrote:
Mon Jun 19, 2017 8:29 am
On these old bikes that have not been wrenched on for a while some of the screws can be difficult to break lose. They are steel threads in aluminum holes. You get a little galvanic corrosion there. I will take a small flat punch and hit the edge of the screw a couple of times to "shock" the threads and break them lose. If you bugger up the screwdriver slot just tap the screwdriver end into the screw to straighten them up. For really stubborn screws a small impact driver does the trick if you can get a straight shot at them after the punch trick.

In your case I would try hitting what is left of the screw with the flat punch and try grabbing it with vise grips or tapping the edge with a small flat chisel to get it out.
+1. Once you get it out, use an Allen bolt to replace it. While you are at it, replace all the screws with Allen bolts. It also makes it easier to adjust timing.
_____
Brian

2014 Honda CTX1300 (BlackThunder aka Predator)
1977 Honda GL1000 (Ox)
1980 Honda CB750F (BlueThunder)
1982 Honda CB900F (RedThunder)

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Fred Camper
Posts: 1202
Joined: Sun Aug 16, 2009 9:15 pm
Location: Metro Detroit, MI
Motorcycle: 1977 GL1000, 1976 LTD GL1000

Re: ignition timing...

Post by Fred Camper » Mon Jun 19, 2017 2:57 pm

An impact driver with a cross bit is the best method in the future. Heat and allowing it to cool repeatedly often can break the corrosion. Is that direct to the engine block? If not, consider a part replacement as those are less expensive than your time.

unkle buckie
Posts: 22
Joined: Fri Jul 25, 2014 12:36 am
Location: Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
Motorcycle: 1979 GL 1000

Re: ignition timing...

Post by unkle buckie » Tue Jun 20, 2017 12:56 am

as a reply to all of the above, i soaked it in wd40, avoiding contact with the points as much as possible, chipped a groove into the soft metal the following afternoon, used the biggest friggin' screwdriver in the box and hey presto.. out she came. and once the elation died down, allen key reploacement, then down to the nitty gritty of fine tuning the timing. despite everything i've read about split difference adjustment, bottom line is try it and see at what you judge tdc... this whole 2 degree thing is so hit and miss with the limited amount of play in either the base or the sub base plate, its not worth stressing over. check the gap at every stage, end of story. you may lose top or bottom end a tad, but ride it and see, then adjust some more if need be.

still would appreciate a layman version though, purely for clarification/confirmation

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Aussie81Interstate
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Location: Penrith Australia
Motorcycle: 2001 GL1500F6C Valkyrie
1982 CX500 Turbo (restoration project)
1981 GL1100 Interstate (sold)
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Re: ignition timing...

Post by Aussie81Interstate » Tue Jun 20, 2017 3:02 am

Just as a hint - I used to have a Honda 750 four SOHC which also had the same points set up as the early Goldwing.

When adjusting the points to reset them - I used a dwell meter on mine, there are lots of different ways to get set up properly, but one of those is where there is limited movement in the base plate and sub plate is to slightly elongate the adjusting plate screw hole - which will give you further adjustment or play room when trying to get them spot on.

It is one way of getting further adjustments out of an already limited process. This is also impacted by the wear on the points plate on the distributor rotation points, when it waers down it will also affect the timing - need to keep that lubricated well - one drop of oil every 1000 miles does it.



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