Plate "A" & "B",Timing Belt Adjusting


Information and questions on GL1000 Goldwings (1975-1979)
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dmoxley49
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Location: Bells, TN
Motorcycle: 1978 GL1000, 2014 Can Am Spyder, 2016 Slingshot

Plate "A" & "B",Timing Belt Adjusting

Post by dmoxley49 » Wed Dec 06, 2017 5:46 pm



Hi All,

I am in the middle of rebuilding the belt adjusters on a 1978 Goldwing. I have removed the pulley from both plates (ones I bought off of Ebay to try this out). Both adjusters have a backing plate "A" & "B" that will interfere with the new attaching hardware used to assemble the pulley to the mounting plate. My question is, are these "A" & "B" plates needed? They were done away in later years. If they must be used, I am thinking about modifying them (grind them) to not get in the way of the new hardware.

The plates I am talking about that will be removed or modified are attached . . .

Thanks in advance . . . Don
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dingdong
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Re: Plate "A" & "B",Timing Belt Adjusting

Post by dingdong » Thu Dec 07, 2017 3:04 pm

75/77 had brackets but they were straight not L shaped as the 78/79. 1980 on had no brackets. I doubt they are needed. ???
Tom

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dmoxley49
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Joined: Thu Oct 02, 2014 8:41 pm
Location: Bells, TN
Motorcycle: 1978 GL1000, 2014 Can Am Spyder, 2016 Slingshot

Re: Plate "A" & "B",Timing Belt Adjusting

Post by dmoxley49 » Fri Dec 08, 2017 7:47 am

Thanks for the comments. I tend to agree with you since there does not seem to be a clear explanation, that I have found, of why they were used to begin with. I think I have a solution however. I found a correct sized plow bolt and lock nut, that with a little mod to the bolt (minimal grinding underneath the head of the bolt along the shank) will install and fit flush allowing the mounting plate to slide over the adjusting plate with no obstructions. The hardware is a grade 5 bolt and grade 8 lock nut, zinc plated, so it should be strong enough and weatherproof.

I'll post pictures after I get the hardware and start the assembly. Meanwhile, the adjusting plate mystery still lives. The only clear purpose it seems to serve is, a spacer between the block mounting points and the pulley assembly. I doubt it is that simple.

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dmoxley49
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Joined: Thu Oct 02, 2014 8:41 pm
Location: Bells, TN
Motorcycle: 1978 GL1000, 2014 Can Am Spyder, 2016 Slingshot

Re: Plate "A" & "B",Timing Belt Adjusting

Post by dmoxley49 » Fri Dec 15, 2017 7:38 pm

The job is complete. Pictures of the hardware required and completed assembly are included. Something worth noting is, the procedures I have seen to date included bolts/screws that left a raised portion of the bolt/screw head on the back of the mounting plate. That has been dealt with by grinding the bolt head down or in the case of some Goldwing years, did not present a problem. As stated in my original posting, having a protruding bolt head did present a problem.

After some looking around, I found that a Plow Bolt would eliminate the bolt head issue. This works best if you punch out the remainder of the stud left after cutting off the original pulley from the mounting plate. What is left is the countersunk hole that was used to mount the stud/pulley to the OEM mounting plate.

The hardware I ended up with:

42015 Gates Pulley (Amazon)
3/8"-16 x 1" Grade 5 Zinc Finish #3 Flat Head Plow Bolt (Fastenal)
3/8 stainless flat washer (Home Depot)
1/2 stainless flat washer (Home Depot), used as a spacer between the pulley and the mounting plate
Stainless Nut and Lock washer for the plow bolt (had those on hand)

I had intended to use a lock nut, but the one I purchased did not fit properly, so I went with plan B, nut and lock washer.

Beyond that, I used the blue style thread locker, since I want to be able to disassemble this setup if need be. I also sprayed the plate with a rust reformer prior to assembly. I have found that this paint lasts longer and forms a fairly good bond with the metal. There was no rust present on the plate to begin so this was just a feel good moment for me.

Lastly, I found that the tight fit of the bolt head in the countersunk hole in the mounting plate allowed me to tighten and then torque the nut onto the bolt without the bolt head turning. The nut was torqued to 25 foot pounds after putting the plate in a vice to hold it still while torquing.
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